Æsir
In Old Norse, ǫ́ss (or áss, ás, plural æsir; feminine ásynja, plural ásynjur) is the term denoting a member of the principal pantheon in the indigenous Germanic religion known as Norse religion. This ...
Æsir - Wikipedia
Æsir-Vanir War
In Norse mythology, the Æsir–Vanir War was a conflict between two groups of deities that ultimately resulted in the unification of the Æsir and the Vanir into a single pantheon. The war is an importan...
Æsir-Vanir War - Wikipedia
List of Germanic deities and heroes
In Germanic paganism, the indigenous religion of the ancient Germanic peoples that inhabited Germanic Europe, there were a number of different gods and goddesses. Germanic deities are attested from nu...
Ansuz rune
Ansuz is the conventional name given to the a-rune of the Elder Futhark, ᚨ.The name is based on Common Germanic *ansuz "a god, one of the main deities in Germanic paganism". The Younger Futhark corr...
Ansuz rune - Wikipedia
Asleikr
Oslac may refer to:people called Oslac:
Ásatrú
Germanic neopaganism, also known as Heathenry or Heathenism, Ásatrú (English: Esetroth or Ostroth), Forn Siðr, and also Odinism and Theodism, is the contemporary revival of historical Germanic paganis...
Ásatrú - Wikipedia
Thor
In Norse mythology, Thor (/θɔr/; from Old Norse Þórr) is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing, healing a...
Thor - Wikipedia
Wōden
In Germanic mythology, Odin (from Old Norse Óðinn) is a widely attested god. In Old Norse sources, where most surviving information about the god stems, Odin is associated with healing, death, royalty...
Wōden - Wikipedia
Ítreksjóð
In Norse mythology, Ítreksjóð (Old Norse) is a son of Odin and a god. Ítreksjóð is attested in chapter 75 of the Prose Edda book Skáldskaparmál, where he is listed as among the Æsir and as one of Odin...
Tanngrisnir and Tanngnjóstr
Tanngrisnir (Old Norse "teeth-barer, snarler") and Tanngnjóstr (Old Norse "teeth grinder") are the goats who pull the god Thor's chariot in Norse mythology. They are attested in the Poetic Edda, comp...
Tanngrisnir and Tanngnjóstr - Wikipedia
Sága and Sökkvabekkr
In Norse mythology, Sága ([saːɣa], possibly meaning "seeress") is a goddess associated with the wisdom Sökkvabekkr ([sɔkːwabekːr]; "sunken bank", "sunken bench", or "treasure bank"). At Sökkvabekkr, S...
Sága and Sökkvabekkr - Wikipedia
Seiðr
Seiðr (sometimes anglicized as seidhr, seidh, seidr, seithr or seith) is an Old Norse term for a type of sorcery which was practised in Norse society during the Late Scandinavian Iron Age. Connected w...
Seiðr - Wikipedia
List of names of Thor
The Germanic god Thor (Old Norse: Þórr) is referred to by many names in Old Norse poetry and literature. Some of the names come from the Prose Edda list Nafnaþulur, and are not attested elsewhere, whi...
Sjöfn
In Norse mythology, Sjöfn is a goddess associated with love. Sjöfn is attested in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; and in three kennings employed in skaldic poetry. Sch...
Hnoss
In Norse mythology, Hnoss (Old Norse "treasure") is the daughter of Freyja and Óðr, and sister of Gersemi.
Hnoss - Wikipedia
Odin
In Germanic mythology, Odin (from Old Norse Óðinn) is a widely attested god. In Old Norse sources, where most surviving information about the god stems, Odin is associated with healing, death, royalty...
Odin - Wikipedia
Hœnir
In Norse mythology, Hœnir is one of the Æsir. He is mentioned as the one who helped Odin to create humans.
In Ynglinga saga, along with Mímir, he went to the Vanir as a hostage to seal a truce aft...
Hœnir - Wikipedia
Sons of Odin
Various gods and men appear as Sons of Odin or Sons of Wodan/Wotan or Sons of Woden in old Old Norse and Old High German and Old English texts.
Four gods, Thor, Baldr, Viðarr and Váli, are explici...
Váli
In Norse mythology, Váli is a son of the god Odin and the giantess Rindr. Váli has numerous brothers including Baldr and Thor. He was birthed for the sole purpose of killing Höðr as revenge for Höðr's...
Váli - Wikipedia
Forseti
Forseti (Old Norse "the presiding one," actually "president" in Modern Icelandic and Faroese) is an Æsir god of justice and reconciliation in Norse mythology. He is generally identified with Fosite, a...
Forseti - Wikipedia
Sigyn
In Norse mythology, Sigyn (Old Norse "victorious girl-friend") is a goddess and is the wife of Loki. Sigyn is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources...
Sigyn - Wikipedia
Bragi Boddason
In his Edda Snorri Sturluson quotes many stanzas attributed to Bragi Boddason the old (Bragi Boddason inn gamli), a Norwegian court poet who served several Swedish kings, Ragnar Lodbrok, Östen Beli an...
Bragi Boddason - Wikipedia
Hlín
In Norse mythology, Hlín (Old Norse "protectress") is a goddess associated with the goddess Frigg. Hlín appears in a poem in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sour...
Hlín - Wikipedia
Þriði
In Norse mythology, Þriði ("Third"), anglicized as Thridi, is either one of the many names of Odin given in Grimnismal or the name of one of the three characters (along with Hárr and Jafnhárr) questi...
Neopaganism in the United Kingdom
The Neo-pagan movement in the United Kingdom is primarily represented by Wicca and Witchcraft religions, Druidry, and Heathenry. According to the 2011 UK Census, there are roughly 53,172 people who id...
Neopaganism in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia
Lóðurr
Lóðurr is a god in Norse mythology. In the Poetic Edda poem Völuspá he is assigned a role in animating the first humans, but apart from that he is hardly ever mentioned, and remains obscure. Scholars ...
Lóðurr - Wikipedia
Skjöldr
Skjöldr (Latinized as Skioldus, sometimes Anglicized as Skjold or Skiold) was among the first legendary Danish kings. He is mentioned in the Prose Edda, in Ynglinga saga, in Chronicon Lethrense, in Sv...
Skjöldr - Wikipedia
List of names of Odin
Odin (Old Norse Óðinn), the chief god of Norse mythology, was referred to by more than 200 names in the skaldic and Eddic traditions.
Bilskirnir
Bilskirnir (Old Norse "lightning-crack") is the hall of the god Thor in Norse mythology. Here he lives with his wife Sif and their children. According to Grímnismál, the hall is the greatest of buildi...
Gersemi
In Norse mythology, Gersemi (Old Norse "treasure") is the daughter of Freyja and Óðr, and sister of Hnoss.