Émile Durkheim
David Émile Durkheim ([emil dyʁkɛm] [dyʁkajm]; April 15, 1858 – November 15, 1917) was a French sociologist, social psychologist and philosopher. He formally established the academic discipline and —...
Émile Durkheim - Wikipedia
Social fact
In sociology, social facts are the values, cultural norms, and social structures which transcend the individual and are capable of exercising a social constraint. French sociologist Émile Durkheim def...
Suicide (book)
Suicide (French: Le Suicide) was a groundbreaking book in the field of sociology. Written by French sociologist Émile Durkheim and published in 1897 it was ostensibly a case study of suicide, a pu...
Benevolent suicide
Benevolent suicide, also referred to as agathusia (gr. agathos + thusia, ἀγαθὸς + θυσία, noble sacrifice) refers to the self sacrifice of one's own life for sake of the greater good. Such sacrifice m...
Sacred–profane dichotomy
The sacred–profane dichotomy is an idea posited by French sociologist Émile Durkheim, who considered it to be the central characteristic of religion: "religion is a unified system of beliefs and pract...
The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life
The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (French: Les formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse), published by French sociologist Émile Durkheim in 1912, is a book that analyzes religion as a social ...
Altruistic suicide
Altruistic suicide is suicide committed for the benefit of others. Falling on a grenade is one such example. Émile Durkheim notes that tribal people sometimes see it as their duty to commit suicide, a...
Collective consciousness
Collective conscious or collective conscience (French: conscience collective) is the set of shared beliefs, ideas and moral attitudes which operate as a unifying force within society. The term wa...
The Division of Labour in Society
The Division of Labour in Society (French: De la division du travail social) is the doctoral dissertation of French sociologist Émile Durkheim, published in 1893. It was influential in advancing s...
World view
A comprehensive world view (or worldview) is the fundamental cognitive orientation of an individual or society encompassing the entirety of the individual or society's knowledge and point of view. A w...
Systems psychology
Systems psychology is a branch of both theoretical psychology and applied psychology that studies human behaviour and experience in complex systems. It is inspired by systems theory and systems thinki...
Anomie
Anomie (/ˈænəˌmi/) is a "condition in which society provides little moral guidance to individuals". It is the breakdown of social bonds between an individual and the community e.g. if under unruly sce...
Collective effervescence
Collective effervescence (CE) is a sociological concept introduced by Émile Durkheim. According to Durkheim, a community or society may at times come together and simultaneously communicate the same t...
Mechanical and organic solidarity
In sociology, "mechanical solidarity" and "organic solidarity" refer to the concepts of solidarity as developed by Émile Durkheim. They are used in the context of differentiating between mechanical an...
List of world folk-epics
World folk-epics are those epics which are not just literary masterpieces but also an integral part of the weltanschauung of a people. They were originally oral literatures, which were later written d...
Law of three stages
The Law of Three Stages is an idea developed by Auguste Comte in his work The Course in Positive Philosophy. It states that society as a whole, and each particular science, develops through three ment...
The Rules of Sociological Method
The Rules of Sociological Method (French: Les Règles de la Méthode Sociologique) is a book by Émile Durkheim, first published in 1895. It is recognized as being the direct result of Durkheim's own...
The Rules of Sociological Method - Wikipedia
Logical positivism
Logical positivism and logical empiricism, which together formed neopositivism, was a movement in Western philosophy that embraced verificationism, an approach that sought to legitimize philosophical ...
Tulpa
Tulpa (Tibetan: སྤྲུལ་པ, Wylie: sprul-pa; Sanskrit: निर्मित nirmita and निर्माण nirmāṇa; "to build" or "to construct") also translated as "magical emanation", "conjured thing" and "phan...
Social identity theory
A social identity is the portion of an individual's self-concept derived from perceived membership in a relevant social group. As originally formulated by Henri Tajfel and John Turner in the 1970s and...
Social identity theory - Wikipedia
Superorganism
A superorganism is an organism consisting of many organisms. The term is used most often to describe a social unit of eusocial animals, where division of labour is highly specialised and where individ...
Superorganism - Wikipedia
Social representations
A social representation is a stock of values, ideas, metaphors, beliefs, and practices that are shared among the members of groups and communities. Social representation theory is a body of theory wit...
Constructive empiricism
In philosophy, constructive empiricism is a form of empiricism. Bas van Fraassen is nearly solely responsible for the initial development of constructive empiricism; its historically most important pr...
L'Année Sociologique
L'Année Sociologique is a sociology journal founded in 1898 by Émile Durkheim, who also served as its editor. It was published annually until 1925, and returned to publication as Annales Sociologiques...
Sociological positivism
Positivism is the philosophy of science that information derived from logical and mathematical treatments and reports of sensory experience is the exclusive source of all authoritative knowledge, and ...
Sociological positivism - Wikipedia
Positivism dispute
Positivismusstreit is the German word for the positivism dispute, and refers to a well-known political-philosophical dispute between the critical rationalists (Karl Popper, Hans Albert) and the Frankf...
Positivism dispute - Wikipedia
Collective unconscious
Collective unconscious is a term of analytical psychology, coined by Carl Jung. It is proposed to be a part of the unconscious mind, expressed in humanity and all life forms with nervous systems, and ...
Collective unconscious - Wikipedia
Auguste Comte
Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier Comte (19 January 1798 – 5 September 1857), better known as Auguste Comte ([oɡyst kɔ̃t]), was a French philosopher. He was a founder of the discipline of sociolog...
Auguste Comte - Wikipedia
Social organism
In sociology, the social organism is an ideological concept in which a society or social structure is viewed as a “living organism.” From this perspective, typically, the relation of social features,...