Conserving Dürer’s Triumphal Arch
Dürer, born #onthisday in 1471, produced one of the largest prints ever – the Triumphal Arch for the Holy Roman Emperor. Altogether it’s nearly 3 meters tall and consists of 36 sheets of paper.
British Museum. One of the best collections anywhere in the World. London, England
The British Museum is a museum in London dedicated to human history and culture. Other British Museums on my Channel Natural History Museum; http://youtu.be/...
Visiting the British Museum, London
A photo tour of the British Museum in London, focusing on the Europe 1800 - 1900 Collection,
Herman Moll
Herman Moll (1654? – September 22, 1732), was a cartographer, engraver, and publisher.
Moll's exact place of origin is unknown, although his birth year is generally accepted to be the year 1...
Herman Moll - Wikipedia
History of fire safety legislation in the United Kingdom
The history of fire safety legislation in the United Kingdom formally covers the period from the formation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801 but is founded in the history of ...
Liberty of the Mint
The Mint was a district in Southwark, south London, England, on the west side of Borough High Street, around where Marshalsea Road is now located, so named because a mint authorised by King Henry VIII...
James Dodsley
James Dodsley (1724–1797) was an English bookseller.
Dodsley was born near Mansfield in Nottinghamshire in 1724. He was probably employed in the shop of his prosperous brother, Robert, by whom he ...
James Dodsley - Wikipedia
Edmund Curll
Edmund Curll (c. 1675 – 11 December 1747) was an English bookseller and publisher. His name has become synonymous, through the attacks on him by Alexander Pope, with unscrupulous publication and publ...
Edmund Curll - Wikipedia
Sarah Coysh
Sarah Coysh (c. 1742 – 1801) was the heiress to the estates of the Coysh, Allen, and James families. Her marriage to John Rolls (1735 – 1801) illustrates one of the methods by which the re...
Sarah Coysh - Wikipedia
History of Harringay (1750–1880)
This significant period in Harringay's history witnessed the transition from a purely pastoral society and set the stage for the upheavals of the late 19th century.
Over the 130 years covered by t...
History of Harringay (1750–1880) - Wikipedia
The Gymnastic Society
The Gymnastic Society was an eighteenth-century London sports club for the pursuit of football and wrestling. It is arguably the first football club.
The club was established in London by gentlem...
Robert Dodsley
Robert Dodsley (13 February 1704 – 23 September 1764) was an English bookseller, poet, playwright, and miscellaneous writer.
Dodsley was born near Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, where his father was ...
Robert Dodsley - Wikipedia
First Exhibition (1756)
London's first ever exhibition of living artists took place during 1760, and was organised and hosted by the Royal Society of Arts. There were 130 pictures by 69 painters in the exhibition, including ...
John Wilkes
John Wilkes (17 October 1725 – 26 December 1797) was an English radical, journalist, and politician.He was first elected Member of Parliament in 1757. In the Middlesex election dispute, he fought for ...
John Wilkes - Wikipedia
Ireland Shakespeare forgeries
The Ireland Shakespeare forgeries were a cause célèbre in 1790s London, when author and engraver Samuel Ireland announced the discovery of a treasure-trove of Shakespearean manuscripts by his son Will...
Commission for Building Fifty New Churches
The Commission for Building Fifty New Churches (in London and the surroundings) was an organisation set up by Act of Parliament in England in 1710, the New Churches in London and Westminster Act 1710,...
British Museum
The British Museum is a museum dedicated to human history and culture, located in the Bloomsbury area of London.Its permanent collection, numbering some 8 million works, is among the largest and most ...
British Museum - Wikipedia
The North Briton
The North Briton was a radical newspaper published in 18th century London. The North Briton also served as the pseudonym of the newspaper's author, used in advertisements, letters to other publication...
Handel at Cannons
George Frideric Handel was the house composer at Cannons from August 1717 until February 1719. The Chandos Anthems and other important works by Handel were conceived, written or first performed at Can...
Handel at Cannons - Wikipedia
Samuel Richardson
Samuel Richardson (19 August 1689 – 4 July 1761) was an 18th-century English writer and printer. He is best known for his three epistolary novels: Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded (1740), Clarissa: Or the ...
Samuel Richardson - Wikipedia
Hoxne Hoard
1°11′E / 52.333°N 1.183°E / 52.333; 1.183The Hoxne Hoard (/ˈhɒksən/ HOK-sən) is the largest hoard of late Roman silver and gold discovered in Britain, and the largest collecti...
Hoxne Hoard - Wikipedia
18th-century London
The 18th century was a period of rapid growth for London, reflecting an increasing national population, the early stirrings of the Industrial Revolution, and London's role at the centre of the evolvi...
18th-century London - Wikipedia
Hawkubites
The Hawkubites were a gang that terrorized the city of London from 1711 to 1714, during the reign of Queen Anne. It is claimed that the Hawkubites beat up women, children, watchmen, and old men in th...
Alexander Donaldson (bookseller)
Alexander Donaldson (bap. 1727 – 11 March 1794) was a Scottish bookseller, publisher, and printer. Donaldson was the founding publisher of the weekly newspaper, the Edinburgh Advertiser. He was also ...
Alexander Donaldson (bookseller) - Wikipedia
Factories Act 1961
The Factories Act 1961 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. At the time of its passage, the Act consolidated much legislation on workplace health, safety and welfare in Great Britain. Th...
Mohocks
The Mohocks were allegedly a gang of violent, well-born criminals that terrorized London in the early 18th century, attacking men and women alike. Taking their name from the Mohawk Indians, they were ...
Worshipful Company of Loriners
The Worshipful Company of Loriners is one of the ancient Livery Companies of the City of London. The organisation was originally a trade association for makers of metal parts for bridles, harnesses, s...
British Museum Act 1767
The British Museum Act 1767 (7 Geo 3 c 18) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain.The whole Act was repealed by section 13(5) of, and Schedule 4 to, the British Museum Act 1963.
Keith's Chapel
Keith's Chapel also known as Mr Keith's Chapel and the May Fair Chapel, was a private chapel in Curzon Street, Mayfair, London, operated by the 18th century Church of England clergyman Alexander Keith...