The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Plato
The school founded by this antique philosopher, became a prototype of modern higher education. Contemporaries named him «the divine teacher»: in his works it...
The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Laws (dialogue)
The Laws (Greek: Νόμοι; Latin: De Legibus) is Plato's last and longest dialogue. The conversation depicted in the work's twelve books begins with the question of who is given the credit for establish...
Hippias Major
Hippias Major (or What is Beauty? or Greater Hippias (Greek: Ἱππίας μείζων), to distinguish it from the Hippias Minor, which has the same chief character) is one of the dialogues of Plato. It belo...
Euthyphro
Euthyphro (/ˈjuːθɪfroʊ/; Ancient Greek: Εὐθύφρων, Euthuphrōn) is one of Plato's early dialogues, dated to after 399 BC. Taking place during the weeks leading up to Socrates's trial, the dialogue ...
Timaeus (dialogue)
Timaeus (/taɪˈmiːəs/; Greek: Τίμαιος, Timaios, [tǐmaɪ̯os]) is one of Plato's dialogues, mostly in the form of a long monologue given by the titular character, written circa 360 BC. The work puts forwa...
Timaeus (dialogue) - Wikipedia
Crito
Crito (/ˈkraɪtoʊ/ KRY-toh or /ˈkriːtoʊ/ KREE-toh; Ancient Greek: Κρίτων [krítɔːn]) is a dialogue by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato. It is a conversation between Socrates and his wealthy fri...
First Alcibiades
The First Alcibiades or Alcibiades I (Greek: Ἀλκιβιάδης αʹ) is a dialogue featuring Alcibiades in conversation with Socrates. It is ascribed to Plato, although scholars are divided on the questio...
Second Alcibiades
The Second Alcibiades or Alcibiades II (Greek: Ἀλκιβιάδης βʹ) is a dialogue traditionally ascribed to Plato. In it, Socrates attempts to persuade Alcibiades that it is unsafe for him to pray to t...
Statesman (dialogue)
The Statesman (Greek: Πολιτικός, Politikos; Latin: Politicus), also known by its Latin title, Politicus, is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato. The text describes a conversation among Socrates, the...
Euaeon of Lampsacus
Euaeon of Lampsacus (Greek: Εὐαίων Λαμψακηνός) was one of Plato's students.
Euaeon of Lampsacus - Wikipedia
Gorgias (dialogue)
Gorgias (/ˈɡɔrdʒiəs/; Greek: Γοργίας) is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato around 380 BC. In this dialogue, Socrates seeks the true definition of rhetoric, attempting to pinpoint the essence o...
Atlantis
Atlantis (Ancient Greek: Ἀτλαντὶς νῆσος, "island of Atlas") is a fictional island mentioned within an allegory on the hubris of nations in Plato's works Timaeus and Critias, where it represents t...
Atlantis - Wikipedia
5040 (number)
5040 is a factorial (7!), a superior highly composite number, a colossally abundant number, and the number of permutations of 4 items out of 10 choices (10 × 9 × 8 × 7 = 5040).
Plato mentions in h...
Symposium (Plato)
The Symposium (Ancient Greek: Συμπόσιον) is a philosophical text by Plato dated c. 385–370 BC. It concerns itself at one level with the genesis, purpose and nature of love, and (in latter-d...
Symposium (Plato) - Wikipedia
King Xuan of Chu
King Xuan of Chu (Chinese: 楚宣王; pinyin: Chǔ Xuān Wáng, died 340 BC) was from 369 to 340 BC the king of the state of Chu during the Warring States period of ancient China. He was born Xiong Li...
King Xuan of Chu - Wikipedia
Euthydemus (dialogue)
Euthydemus (Greek: Εὐθύδημος, Euthydemos), written circa 384 BCE, is a dialogue by Plato which satirizes what Plato presents as the logical fallacies of the Sophists. In it, Socrates describes to ...
Archytas
Archytas (/ˈɑrkɪtəs/; Greek: Ἀρχύτας; 428–347 BC) was an Ancient Greek philosopher, mathematician, astronomer, statesman, and strategist. He was a scientist of the Pythagorean school and famous fo...
Archytas - Wikipedia
Sisyphus (dialogue)
The Sisyphus (Greek: Σίσυφος) is purported to be one of the dialogues of Plato. The dialogue is extant and was included in the Stephanus edition published in Geneva in 1578. It is now generally ac...
Nicochares
Nicochares (Greek: Νικοχάρης, died ca. 345 BC) was an Athenian poet of the Old Comedy, son of Philonides and contemporary with Aristophanes. The titles of Nicochares' plays, as enumerated by Suid...
Ancient Greek flood myths
Greek mythology describes three floods, the flood of Ogyges, the flood of Deucalion, and the flood of Dardanus. Two of the Greek Ages of Man concluded with a flood: The Ogygian Deluge ended the Silver...
Plato's number
Plato’s number is a number enigmatically referred to by Plato in his dialogue the Republic (8.546b). The text is notoriously difficult to understand and its corresponding translations do not allow an ...
Protagoras (dialogue)
Protagoras (/proʊˈtæɡərəs/; Greek: Πρωταγόρας) is a dialogue by Plato. The traditional subtitle (which may or may not be Plato's) is "or the Sophists". The main argument is between the elderly Protago...
Stephanus pagination
Stephanus pagination is a system of reference and organization used in modern editions and translations of Plato (and less famously, Plutarch) based on the 1578 edition of Plato's complete works publi...
Stephanus pagination - Wikipedia
Pang Juan
Pang Juan (simplified Chinese: 庞涓; traditional Chinese: 龐涓; pinyin: Páng Juān; Wade–Giles: P'ang Chüan; died 342 BC) was an ancient Chinese military general of the Wei state during the...
Platonic epistemology
Plato's epistemology holds that knowledge of Platonic Ideas is innate, so that learning is the development of ideas buried deep in the soul, often under the midwife-like guidance of an interrogator. ...