'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Plato
The school founded by this antique philosopher, became a prototype of modern higher education. Contemporaries named him «the divine teacher»: in his works it...
Aristotle
Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384 – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the Macedonian city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on...
Aristotle - Wikipedia
Plato
Plato (/ˈpleɪtoʊ/; Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "broad"; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BCE) was a philosopher, as well as mathematician, in Classical Greece. He is considered an essential figure in the devel...
Plato - Wikipedia
Clinomachus
Clinomachus (Greek: Κλεινόμαχος; 4th-century BCE), was a Megarian philosopher from Thurii. He is said by Diogenes Laërtius to have been the first who composed treatises on the fundamental principl...
Euclid of Megara
Euclid of Megara (/ˈjuːklɪd/; also Euclides, Eucleides; Greek: Εὐκλείδης; c. 435 – c. 365 BCE) was a Greek Socratic philosopher who founded the Megarian school of philosophy. He was a pupil of Soc...
Euclid of Megara - Wikipedia
Timolaus of Cyzicus
Timolaus of Cyzicus (Greek: Τιμόλαος Κυζικηνός) was one of Plato's students. Cyzicus is an ancient city of Mysia, located in the northwest of Asia Minor.
Chaeron of Pellene
Chaeron (Ancient Greek: Χαίρων) was a wrestler and tyrant from Pellene, ancient Achaea.Chearon won twice at the Isthmian Games and four times at the Ancient Olympic Games, between 356 BC and 344 ...
Phaedo of Elis
Phaedo of Elis (/ˈfiːdoʊ/; also Phaedon; Greek: Φαίδων ὁ Ἠλεῖος, gen.: Φαίδωνος; fl. 4th century BC) was a Greek philosopher. A native of Elis, he was captured in war and sold into slavery. He subsequ...
Diodorus Cronus
Diodorus Cronus (Greek: Διόδωρος Κρόνος; died c. 284 BCE) was a Greek philosopher and dialectician connected to the Megarian school. He was most notable for logic innovations, including his master...
Aristotle's wheel paradox
Aristotle's wheel paradox is a paradox from the Greek work Mechanica traditionally attributed to Aristotle. There are two wheels, one within the other, whose rims take the shape of two circles with di...
Aristotle's wheel paradox - Wikipedia
Phintys
Phintys (or Phyntis, Greek: Φίντυς; 4th or 3rd century BC) was a Pythagorean philosopher. Nothing is known about her life, nor where she came from. She wrote a work on the correct behaviour of wom...
Clearchus of Soli
Clearchus of Soli (Greek: Kλέαρχoς, Klearkhos) was a Greek philosopher of the 4th–3rd century BCE, belonging to Aristotle's Peripatetic school. He was born in Soli in Cyprus.He wrote extensively o...
Clearchus of Soli - Wikipedia
Diogenes of Sinope
Diogenes of Sinope (/daɪˈɒdʒəˌniːz/; Greek: Διογένης ὁ Σινωπεύς, Diogenēs ho Sinōpeus) was a Greek philosopher and one of the founders of Cynic philosophy. Also known as Diogenes the Cynic (Ancien...
Diogenes of Sinope - Wikipedia
Platonic realism
Platonic realism is a philosophical term usually used to refer to the idea of realism regarding the existence of universals or abstract objects after the Greek philosopher Plato (c. 427–c. 347 B...
Aristippus
Aristippus of Cyrene (/ˌærəˈstɪpəs/; Greek: Ἀρίστιππος; c. 435 – c. 356 BCE) was the founder of the Cyrenaic school of Philosophy. He was a pupil of Socrates, but adopted a very different philos...
Aristippus - Wikipedia
Cleinias of Tarentum
Cleinias of Tarentum (Greek: Κλεινίας; fl. 4th-century BCE) was a Pythagorean philosopher, and a contemporary and friend of Plato, as appears from the story (perhaps otherwise worthless) which Diogene...
Euphantus
Euphantus (Greek: Εὔφαντος; fl. c. 320 BCE) of Olynthus was a philosopher of the Megarian school as well as an historian and tragic poet. He was the disciple of Eubulides of Miletus, and the instr...
Aeschines of Sphettus
Aeschines of Sphettus or Aeschines Socraticus (sometimes but now rarely written as Aischines or Æschines; Greek: Αἰσχίνης Σφήττιος; c. 425 BC – c. 350 BC), son of Lysanias, of the deme Sphettus of...
Zhuangzi
Zhuangzi may refer to:
Zhuangzi - Wikipedia
Ichthyas
Ichthyas (Greek: Ἰχθύας; fl. 4th-century BCE), the son of Metallus, was a Greek philosopher and a disciple and successor of Euclid of Megara in the Megarian school. He was a colleague of Thrasymac...
Dicaearchus
Dicaearchus of Messana (/ˌdɪsiˈɑrkəs əv məˈsænə/; Greek: Δικαίαρχος Dikaiarkhos; c. 350 – c. 285 BC), also written Dicearchus or Dicearch (/ˈdɪsiˌɑrk/), was a Greek philosopher, cartographer, geograph...
Yang Zhu
Yang Zhu (simplified Chinese: 杨朱; traditional Chinese: 楊朱; pinyin: Yáng Zhū; Wade–Giles: Yang Chu; 440–360 BC), also known as Yang Zi or Yangzi (Master Yang), was a Chinese philosopher...
Aristoxenus
Aristoxenus of Tarentum (Greek: Ἀριστόξενος; fl. 335 BC) was a Greek Peripatetic philosopher, and a pupil of Aristotle. Most of his writings, which dealt with philosophy, ethics and music, have be...
Aristoxenus - Wikipedia
Dionysius of Chalcedon
Dionysius of Chalcedon (fl. 320 BC) was a Greek philosopher and dialectician connected with the Megarian school. He was a native of Chalcedon on the coast of Bithynia. Dionysius was the person who fi...
Alexamenus of Teos
Alexamenus of Teos (Greek: Τήιος Ἀλεξαμενός) was, according to Aristotle in his dialogue, On Poets, the first person who wrote Socratic dialogues before the time of Plato. An Aristotelian papyrus from...
Arete of Cyrene
Arete of Cyrene (Greek: Ἀρήτη; fl. 5th–4th century BC) was a Cyrenaic philosopher, and the daughter of Aristippus of Cyrene.She learned philosophy from her father, Aristippus, who had himself lear...