Abrahamic conceptions of God
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are sometimes called Abrahamic religions because they all accept the tradition that God revealed himself to the patriarch Abraham. The theological traditions of all A...
Abrahamic conceptions of God - Wikipedia
Split of early Christianity and Judaism
The split of early Christianity and Judaism took place during the first centuries of the Common Era. It is commonly attributed to a number of events, including the rejection and crucifixion of Jesus (...
Split of early Christianity and Judaism - Wikipedia
Hellenistic philosophy and Christianity
Hellenistic philosophy and Christianity refers to the complex interaction between Hellenistic philosophy and early Christianity during the first to fourth centuries.The conflict between the two modes ...
Origins of Christianity
Early Christianity and Early Rabbinical Judaism were significantly influenced by Hellenistic religion and Hellenistic philosophy. Christianity in particular inherited many features of Greco-Roman pag...
Origins of Christianity - Wikipedia
Medieval Christian views on Muhammad
During the Early Middle Ages, the Christian world largely viewed Islam as a Christological heresy and Muhammad as a false prophet. By the Late Middle Ages, Islam was more typically grouped with heathe...
Medieval Christian views on Muhammad - Wikipedia
God in Judaism
The conception of God in Judaism is strictly monotheistic. God is an absolute one, indivisible and incomparable being who is the ultimate cause of all existence. Jewish tradition teaches that the true...
God in Judaism - Wikipedia
God in Christianity
God in Christianity is the eternal being who created and preserves the world. Christians believe God to be both transcendent (wholly independent of, and removed from, the material universe) and immane...
God in Christianity - Wikipedia
God in Islam
In Islamic theology, God (Arabic: الله‎ Allāh) is the all-powerful and all-knowing creator, sustainer, ordainer and judge of the universe. Islam emphasizes that God is strictly singular (taw...
God in the Bahá'í Faith
The Bahá'í view of God is essentially monotheistic. God is the imperishable, uncreated being who is the source of all existence. He is described as "a personal God, unknowable, inaccessible, the sourc...
God in the Bahá'í Faith - Wikipedia
Son of man
"Son of man" is a phrase used in the Hebrew Bible, various apocalyptic works of the inter-testamental period, and the Greek New Testament. In the indefinite form ("son of man", "one like a son of man"...
Son of man - Wikipedia
Pharisees
The Pharisees (/ˈfærəˌsiːz/) were at various times a political party, a social movement, and a school of thought in the Holy Land during the Second Temple period, beginning under the Hasmonean dynast...
Pharisees - Wikipedia
New Wine into Old Wineskins
New Wine into Old Wineskins is, according to the New Testament, one of a pair of parables told by Jesus. It is found at Matthew 9:14-17, Mark 2:21-22 and Luke 5:33-39. A version of the parable also ap...
New Wine into Old Wineskins - Wikipedia
Ruha d-Qudsha
In Aramaic, Ruha d-Qudsha (רוחא דקודשא in square script; ܪܘܚܐ ܕܩܘܕܫܐ in Syriac script, Rûḥâ ḏ-Qûḏšâ in Latin script) means "the spirit of holiness" (corresponding to Hebrew: רוח הקודש‎, Rûăḥ ha-...
Fasid
Fasid (Arabic: فاسد‎) is an Islamic religious concept meaning corruption.In this context, it refers to corruption created by humans, as an embodiment of the 'Left Hand of Allah' (wrath) in r...
Arianism
Arianism is the nontrinitarian, heterodoxical teaching, first attributed to Arius (c. AD 250–336), a Christian presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt, concerning the relationship of God the Father to the Son ...
Arianism - Wikipedia
Epistle of Barnabas
The Epistle of Barnabas (Greek: Επιστολή Βαρνάβα, Hebrew: איגרת בארנבס‎) is a Greek epistle containing twenty-one chapters, preserved complete in the 4th century Codex Sinaiticus where it ap...
At Tawwab
At Tawwaab is one of the Names of Allah. It is part of the 99 Names of God, by which Muslims regard God and which are traditionally maintained as described in the Qur'ān, and Sunnah, amongst other pl...
Jesus in the Talmud
The Talmud contains passages that some scholars have concluded are references to Christian traditions about Jesus. The history of textual transmission of these passages is complex and scholars are not...
Jesus in the Talmud - Wikipedia
Binitarianism
Binitarianism is a Christian theology of two persons, personas, or two aspects in one substance/Divinity (or God). Classically, binitarianism is understood as a form of monotheism — that is, that God...
Kun (Islamic term)
Kun (كن) is an Arabic word for the act of manifesting, existing or being. In the Qur'an, Allah commands the universe to be ("kun!" !كن), and it is (fayakūn فيكون)."Kun fayakūn" has its reference ...
Rabb
Rabb (Arabic: رب‎, Turkish: Rab is an Arabic word meaning Lord, Sustainer, Cherisher, Master, Nourisher. In Islam, Ar-Rabb is often used to address Allah, although Ar-Rabb is not one of ...
Historical background of New Testament
Most scholars who study the Historical Jesus and Early Christianity believe that the Canonical Gospels and life of Jesus must be viewed as firmly placed within his historical and cultural context, ra...
Historical background of New Testament - Wikipedia
Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit, or Holy Ghost, is a term found in English translations of the Bible, but understood differently among the Abrahamic religions.
The Hebrew language phrase ruach ha-kodesh (Hebrew: רוח ...
Holy Spirit - Wikipedia
YHWH
The tetragrammaton (from Greek τετραγράμματον, meaning "(consisting of) four letters") is the Hebrew theonym יהוה, commonly transliterated into Latin letters as YHWH. It is one of the names of the nat...
YHWH - Wikipedia
James the Just
James (Hebrew: יעקב Ya'akov; Greek Ἰάκωβος Iákōbos, also could be anglicized as Jacob), who died in martyrdom in 62 or 69 AD, was an important figure of the Apostolic Age. His usual epithets are James...
Marcion of Sinope
Marcion of Sinope (/ˈmɑrʃən, -ʃiən, -siən/; Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important leader in early Christianity. His theology rejected the deity described in the Hebrew Scriptu...
Marcion of Sinope - Wikipedia
Divine countenance
The divine countenance is the face of God.
In pagan religions, the face of God might be viewed in a literal sense - the face of an idol in a temple. In prayers and blessings, the concept was more...
Divine countenance - Wikipedia
Birkat haMinim
The Birkat ha-Minim (Hebrew ברכת המינים "Blessing on the heretics") is a Jewish prayer of blessing on heretics in general, and sometimes Christians, though in this context "blessing" may also be a eu...
Al Fattah
Al Fattah is one of the Names of Allah. It is part of the 99 Names by which Muslims regard God, and which are traditionally maintained as described in the Qur'ān and Sunnah, amongst other places..
Sanhedrin trial of Jesus
The Sanhedrin trial of Jesus refers to the trial of Jesus before the Sanhedrin (a Jewish judicial body) following his arrest in Jerusalem and prior to his dispensation by Pontius Pilate. It is an even...
Sanhedrin trial of Jesus - Wikipedia