Akkadian Empire
44°6′E / 33.100°N 44.100°E / 33.100; 44.100 The Akkadian Empire /əˈkeɪdiən/ was an ancient Semitic empire centered in the city of Akkad /ˈækæd/ and its surrounding reg...
Akkadian Empire - Wikipedia
Sumerian language
Sumerian (𒅴𒂠 EME.G̃IR15 "native tongue") is the language of ancient Sumer, which was spoken in southern Mesopotamia (modern Iraq). During the 3rd millennium BC, a very intimate cultural symbiosis de...
Sumerian language - Wikipedia
Akkadian language
Akkadian (akkadû, 𒅎𒀝𒂵𒌈 ak.kADû) is an extinct east Semitic language (part of the greater Afroasiatic language family) that was spoken in ancient Mesopotamia. The earliest attested Semitic languag...
Akkadian language - Wikipedia
Marad
44°47′00″E / 32.09278°N 44.78333°E / 32.09278; 44.78333 (Marad)Marad (Sumerian: Marda, modern Tell Wannat es-Sadum or Tell as-Sadoum, Iraq) was an ancient Sumerian ci...
Marad - Wikipedia
Igigi (Akkadian King)
Igigi (fl. 2257 BCE) was a king of the Akkadian Empire. His rule began in 2257 BCE, and he fought for power in Akkad after the death of Shar-Kali-Sharri.
Sumerian cuneiform
Cuneiform script is one of the earliest known systems of writing, distinguished by its wedge-shaped marks on clay tablets, made by means of a blunt reed for a stylus. The name cuneiform itself simply ...
Sumerian cuneiform - Wikipedia
Azupiranu
Azupiranu was a town in ancient Mesopotamia. The exact location is unknown. In a Neo-Assyrian text purporting to be the autobiography of Sargon of Akkad, Azupiranu is named as Sargon's birthplace and ...
TI (cuneiform)
Cuneiform TI or TÌL (Borger 2003 nr. ; U+122FE 𒋾) has the main meaning of "life" when used ideographically. The written sign developed from the drawing of an arrow, since the words meani...
TI (cuneiform) - Wikipedia
Tell Brak
Tell Brak, ancient Nagar, is a tell, or settlement mound, in the Upper Khabur area in Al-Hasakah Governorate, northeastern Syria. The site was occupied between the sixth and second millennia BC. At 40...
Tell Brak - Wikipedia
Ilulu
Ilulu or Elulu, according to the Sumerian king list, was one of four rivals vying to be king of the Akkadian Empire, during a three year period after the death of Shar-kali-sharri.While there is virtu...
Tell Leilan
Tell Leilan is an archaeological site situated near the Wadi Jarrah in the Khabur River basin in Al-Hasakah Governorate, northeastern Syria, a region formerly a part of ancient Assyria. The site has b...
Tell Leilan - Wikipedia
Nuzi
44°15′18″E / 35.3699722222222°N 44.2549166666667°E / 35.3699722222222; 44.2549166666667 (Nuzi (Gasur, Yorghan Tepe))Nuzi (or Nuzu; Akkadian Gasur; modern Yorghan Tepe,...
La'ibum
Laʻibum was an Akkadian man. He is mentioned once in the Sumerian Sargon legend as the father of Sargon of Akkad. No details about his life or historicity are known, although the Sumerian king list st...
Imi
Imi was a king of the Akkadian Empire from 2257 to (unknown) BC. He fought for the power in Akkad after the death of Shar-Kali-Sharri.
Imi - Wikipedia
Conquests of Sargon of Akkad
Sargon of Akkad was the first ruler to carve out an empire by conquest. Establishing a power base in his own city at Akkad, he then conquered the powerful city of Uruk, seizing hegemony over all the o...
Nanum (king)
Nanum or Nanium was a king of the Akkadian Empire who ascended the throne in 2257 BC. After the death of the previous ruler of Akkad, Shar-Kali-Sharri, he jockeyed for power with three other rival ki...
Tashlultum
Tashlultum (fl. ca. late 24th-early 23rd centuries BCE) was a wife of King Sargon of Akkad. Her name is known to archaeology only from a single shard of an alabaster vase or bowl with an inscrip...
Sippar
44°15′08″E / 33.058829°N 44.252153°E / 33.058829; 44.252153 (Sippar)Sippar (Sumerian: Zimbir) was an ancient Near Eastern city on the east bank of the Euphrates river,...
Sippar - Wikipedia
4.2 kiloyear event
The 4.2 kiloyear BP aridification event was one of the most severe climatic events of the Holocene period in terms of impact on cultural upheaval. Starting in ≈2200 BC, it probably lasted the ent...
4.2 kiloyear event - Wikipedia