Ambiguity
Ambiguity is an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolved according to a rule or process consisting of a finite numb...
Ambiguity - Wikipedia
Homonym
In linguistics, a homonym is, in the strict sense, one of a group of words that share the same spelling and pronunciation but have different meanings. Thus homonyms are simultaneously homographs (wo...
Word-sense disambiguation
In computational linguistics, word-sense disambiguation (WSD) is an open problem of natural language processing and ontology. WSD is identifying which sense of a word (i.e. meaning) is used in a sente...
Weasel word
A weasel word (also, anonymous authority) is an informal term for words and phrases aimed at creating an impression that a specific and/or meaningful statement has been made, when only a vague or ambi...
Weasel word - Wikipedia
Lexicography
Lexicography is divided into two separate but equally important groups:A person devoted to lexicography is called a lexicographer.General lexicography focuses on the design, compilation, use and evalu...
Puns
The pun, also called paronomasia, is a form of word play that suggests two or more meanings, by exploiting multiple meanings of words, or of similar-sounding words, for an intended humorous or rhetori...
Vagueness
In analytic philosophy and linguistics, a concept may be considered vague if its extension is deemed lacking in clarity, if there is uncertainty about which objects belong to the concept or which exhi...
Syntactic ambiguity
Syntactic ambiguity, also called amphiboly or amphibology, is a situation where a sentence may be interpreted in more than one way due to ambiguous sentence structure.Syntactic ambiguity arises not fr...
Capitonym
A capitonym is a word that changes its meaning (and sometimes pronunciation) when it is capitalized; the capitalization usually applies due to one form being a proper noun or eponym. It is a portmante...
Lexical substitution
Lexical substitution is the task of identifying a substitute for a word in the context of a clause. For instance, given the following text: "After the match, replace any remaining fluid deficit to preve...
Dangling else
The dangling else is a problem in computer programming in which an optional else clause in an if–then(–else) statement results in nested conditionals being ambiguous. Formally, the reference context-f...
No true Scotsman
No true Scotsman is an informal fallacy, an ad hoc attempt to retain an unreasoned assertion. When faced with a counterexample to a universal claim ("no Scotsman would do such a thing"), rather than d...
Fallacy of division
A fallacy of division occurs when one reasons logically that something true for the whole must also be true of all or some of its parts. An example:The converse of this fallacy is called fallacy of c...
Equivocation
Equivocation ("to call by the same name") is classified as an informal logical fallacy. It is the misleading use of a term with more than one meaning or sense (by glossing over which meaning is intend...
Heterography and homography
In linguistics, heterography is a property of a written language, such that it lacks a 1-to-1 correspondence between the written symbols and the sounds of the spoken language. Its opposite is homograp...
Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana
"Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana" is a humorous saying that is used in linguistics as an example of a garden path sentence or syntactic ambiguity, and in word play as an example of...
Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana - Wikipedia
Lesk algorithm
The Lesk algorithm is a classical algorithm for word sense disambiguation introduced by Michael E. Lesk in 1986.
The Lesk algorithm is based on the assumption that words in a given "neighborhood" ...
That that is is that that is not is not is that it it is
That that is is that that is not is not is that it it is is an English word sequence demonstrating syntactic ambiguity. It is used as an example illustrating the importance of proper punctuation.The s...
List of English homographs
Homographs are words which are spelled the same, but with more than one meaning. A homograph that is pronounced differently is a heteronym, otherwise homophone.Some homographs are nouns or adjective...
Void for vagueness
In American constitutional law, a statute is void for vagueness and unenforceable if it is too vague for the average citizen to understand. There are several reasons a statute may be considered vague;...
Seven Types of Ambiguity (Empson)
Seven Types of Ambiguity was first published in 1930 by William Empson. It was one of the most influential critical works of the 20th century and was a key foundation work in the formation of the New ...
List of true homonyms
Homonyms are words that are both spelled and pronounced the same, but have different meanings.However, some authors use the term more broadly, to refer to homographs (spelled the same) or homophones (...
Word-sense induction
In computational linguistics, word-sense induction (WSI) or discrimination is an open problem of natural language processing, which concerns the automatic identification of the senses of a word (i.e. ...
Loki's Wager
Loki's Wager, a form of logical fallacy, is the unreasonable insistence that a concept cannot be defined, and therefore cannot be discussed.Loki is a Jötunn or Áss in Norse mythology, who, legend has...
Statutory interpretation
Statutory interpretation is the process by which courts interpret and apply legislation. Some amount of interpretation is often necessary when a case involves a statute. Sometimes the words of a statu...
Fallacy of composition
The fallacy of composition arises when one infers that something is true of the whole from the fact that it is true of some part of the whole (or even of every proper part). For example: "This fragmen...