Autistic Boy Sees Mind-Blowing Visions from Heaven!
First-time parents Joe and Tahni Cullen were thrust into the confusing world of autism when their toddler, Josiah, suddenly lost his ability to speak, play and socialize. In their attempts to see Jos...
Arianism
Arianism is the nontrinitarian, heterodoxical teaching, first attributed to Arius (c. AD 250–336), a Christian presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt, concerning the relationship of God the Father to the Son ...
Arianism - Wikipedia
Christology
Christology (from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology which is primarily concerned with the nature and person of Jesus as recorded in the canonic...
Christology - Wikipedia
First seven Ecumenical Councils
In the history of Christianity, the first seven ecumenical councils, from the First Council of Nicaea (325) to the Second Council of Nicaea (787), represented an attempt to reach an orthodox consensus...
First seven Ecumenical Councils - Wikipedia
Gnosticism
Gnosticism (from Ancient Greek: γνωστικός gnostikos, "learned", from γνῶσις gnōsis, knowledge) describes a collection of ancient religions whose adherents shunned the material world - which they ...
Manichaeism
Manichaeism (/ˈmænɨkiːɪzəm/;in Modern Persian آیین مانی Āyin e Māni; Chinese: 摩尼教; pinyin: Móní Jiào) was a major religion that was founded by the Iranian prophet Mani (in Persian: مانی, Syria...
Manichaeism - Wikipedia
New Testament apocrypha
The New Testament apocrypha are a number of writings by early Christians that give accounts of Jesus and his teachings, the nature of God, or the teachings of his apostles and of their lives. These wr...
Trinitarianism
The Christian doctrine of the Trinity (from Latin trinitas "triad", from trinus "threefold") defines God as three consubstantial persons, expressions, or hypostases: the Father, the Son (Jesus Christ)...
Trinitarianism - Wikipedia
Ebion
Ebion (Greek: Εβιων) was the presumed eponymous founder of an early Christian group known as the Ebionites. The existent historical evidence indicates that the name "Ebionite" is derived from a Hebrew...
Autistic Boy Sees Mind-Blowing Visions from Heaven!
First-time parents Joe and Tahni Cullen were thrust into the confusing world of autism when their toddler, Josiah, suddenly lost his ability to speak, play and socialize. In their attempts to see Jos...
Patriarch Stephen I of Antioch
Stephen I of Antioch (Latin: 'Stephanus') was the Bishop of Antioch between 341 and 345 or 342 and 344, depending on the source. He was leader of the Arian party, called Eusebians, during the Ari...
Albigensian Crusade
The Albigensian Crusade or Cathar Crusade (1209–1229) was a 20-year military campaign initiated by Pope Innocent III to eliminate Catharism in Languedoc, in the south of France. The Crusade was prosec...
Albigensian Crusade - Wikipedia
Nativity of Jesus
The Nativity of Jesus, also The Nativity, refers to the accounts of the birth of Jesus, primarily based on the two accounts in the gospels of Luke and Matthew, and secondarily on some apocryphal texts...
Nativity of Jesus - Wikipedia
Patriarch Pyrrhus of Constantinople
Pyrrhus was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 20 December 638 to 29 September 641, and again from 9 January to 1 June 654.He was a supporter of Monotheletism, a christological doctrine p...
Patriarch Pyrrhus of Constantinople - Wikipedia
Day of the Vow
The Day of the Vow (Afrikaans: Geloftedag or Dingaansdag) is the name of a religious public holiday in South Africa until 1994, when it was renamed the Day of Reconciliation. The holiday is 16 Dec...
Day of the Vow - Wikipedia
East-West Schism
The East–West Schism is the break of communion between what are now the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches which began in the 11th century.There had long been ecclesiastical differences and ...
East-West Schism - Wikipedia
Gospel
A gospel is an account describing the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth. The most widely known examples are the four canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, but the term ...
Gospel - Wikipedia
Aramaic primacy
The Aramaic New Testament exists in two forms: (1) the classical Aramaic, or Syriac, New Testament, part of the Peshitta Bible; (2) the "Assyrian Modern" New Testament and Psalms, published by the Bib...
Archbishop Maximianus of Constantinople
Maximianus was the archbishop of Constantinople from 25 October 431 until his death on 12 April 434.
Maximianus had led a monastic life and had entered presbyteral orders; his action in building, ...
First Council of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecum...
First Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia
Monotheism
"Monotheism" is defined by the Encyclopædia Britannica as belief in the existence of one god or in the oneness of God. The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church gives a more restricted definition:...
Monotheism - Wikipedia
Alogi
The Alogi (ἄλογοι, also called "Alogians") were a group of heterodox Christians in Asia Minor that flourished around 170 CE. What we know of them is derived from their doctrinal opponents, whose liter...
Monarchianism
Monarchianism is a set of beliefs that emphasize God as being one person, in direct contrast to Trinitarianism which defines God as three persons coexisting consubstantially as one in being. (The term...
History of the Filioque controversy
There are two separate issues in the Filioque controversy of Christianity, the orthodoxy of the doctrine itself and the liceity of the interpolation of the phrase into the Nicene Creed. Although the d...
History of the Filioque controversy - Wikipedia