'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Plato
The school founded by this antique philosopher, became a prototype of modern higher education. Contemporaries named him «the divine teacher»: in his works it...
'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Archimedes' principle
Archimedes' principle indicates that the upward buoyant force that is exerted on a body immersed in a fluid, whether fully or partially submerged, is equal to the weight of the fluid that the body dis...
Unity of opposites
The unity of opposites was first suggested by Heraclitus (ca. 535–475 BC) a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher.Philosophers had for some time been contemplating the notion of opposites. Anaximander ...
Pythias
Pythias /ˈpɪθiəs/ (Greek: Πυθιάς, Pūthiás), also known as Pythias the Elder, was a Greek biologist and embryologist. She was the adoptive daughter of Hermias of Atarneus, as well as Aristotle's fi...
Thales
Thales of Miletus (/ˈθeɪliːz/; Greek: Θαλῆς (ὁ Μιλήσιος), Thalēs; c. 624 – c. 546 BC) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher from Miletus in Asia Minor and one of the Seven Sages of Greece...
Thales - Wikipedia
Cratylus
Cratylus (/krəˈtaɪləs/; Ancient Greek: Κρατύλος, Kratylos) was an ancient Athenian philosopher from the mid-late 5th century BCE, known mostly through his portrayal in Plato's dialogue Cratylus. ...
Aristotle
Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384 – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the Macedonian city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on...
Aristotle - Wikipedia
Archimedes' screw
Archimedes' screw, also called the Archimedean screw or screwpump, is a machine historically used for transferring water from a low-lying body of water into irrigation ditches. Water is pumped by turn...
Archimedes' screw - Wikipedia
Claw of Archimedes
The Claw (Greek: Ἁρπάγη, harpágē, "snatcher") of Archimedes (also known as the "iron hand") was an ancient weapon devised by Archimedes to defend the seaward portion of Syracuse's city wall agains...
Claw of Archimedes - Wikipedia
Strato of Lampsacus
Strato of Lampsacus (/ˈstreɪtoʊ/; Greek: Στράτων Straton, gen.: Στράτωνος; c. 335 – c. 269 BC) was a Peripatetic philosopher, and the third director (scholarch) of the Lyceum after the death of Th...
Strato of Lampsacus - Wikipedia
Cleombrotus of Ambracia
Cleombrotus (later referred to as Cleombrotus of Ambracia; Greek: Κλεόμβροτος) is a young man mentioned in Plato's Phaedo as one of two young men notably absent when Socrates drank the hemlock. Th...
Cleombrotus of Ambracia - Wikipedia
Opsis
Opsis (Ancient Greek: ὄψις) is the Greek word for spectacle in the theatre and performance. Its first use has been traced back to Aristotle's Poetics. It is now taken up by theatre critics, histo...
Theory of Forms
Plato's theory of Forms or theory of Ideas asserts that non-material abstract (but substantial) forms (or ideas), and not the material world of change known to us through sensation, possess the highes...
Theory of Forms - Wikipedia
Milesian school
The Milesian school was a school of thought founded in the 6th century BC. The ideas associated with it are exemplified by three philosophers from the Ionian town of Miletus, on the Aegean coast of An...
Milesian school - Wikipedia
Archimedes number
In viscous fluid dynamics, the Archimedes number (Ar) (not to be confused with Archimedes' constant, π), named after the ancient Greek scientist Archimedes is used to determine the motion of fluids du...
Charmides (dialogue)
The Charmides (/ˈkɑrmɪdiːz/; Greek: Χαρμίδης) is a dialogue of Plato, in which Socrates engages a handsome and popular boy in a conversation about the meaning of sophrosyne, a Greek word usually trans...
Ocellus Lucanus
Ocellus Lucanus, a Pythagorean philosopher, born in Lucania in the 5th century BC, was perhaps a pupil of Pythagoras himself.Stobaeus (Ecl. Phys. i. 13) has preserved a fragment of his Περὶ νόμου (if ...
Philolaus
Philolaus (/ˌfɪləˈleɪəs/; Greek: Φιλόλαος; c. 470 – c. 385 BCE) was a Greek Pythagorean and Presocratic philosopher. He argued that at the foundation of everything is the part played by the limi...
Philolaus - Wikipedia
Prodicus
Prodicus of Ceos (/ˈproʊdɪkəs/; Greek: Πρόδικος, Pródikos; c. 465 BC – c. 395 BC) was a Greek philosopher, and part of the first generation of Sophists. He came to Athens as ambassador from Ceos, and ...
Plato
Plato (/ˈpleɪtoʊ/; Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "broad"; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BCE) was a philosopher, as well as mathematician, in Classical Greece. He is considered an essential figure in the devel...
Plato - Wikipedia
Axiochus (dialogue)
Axiochus (Greek: Ἀξίοχος) is a Socratic dialogue attributed to Plato, but which is considered spurious. The work dates from the Hellenistic era, c. 1st century BC. The author was probably a Platon...
List of medieval Latin commentators on Aristotle
This is a list of commentators on the works of Aristotle who wrote in Latin, from the Late Antique to the last years of the European Middle Ages. The names are given in their Latin forms.Sources: Take...