'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
Hieronymus of Cardia
Hieronymus of Cardia (Greek: Ἱερώνυμος), Greek general and historian from Cardia in Thrace, was a contemporary of Alexander the Great (356–323 BC).After the death of Alexander he followed the fort...
Derveni krater
The Derveni krater is a volute krater, the most elaborate of its type, discovered in 1962 in a tomb at Derveni, not far from Thessaloniki, and displayed at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki. ...
Derveni krater - Wikipedia
Eurybotadas
Eurybotadas was the son of Tallus, from Orchomenus (Boeotia). He served as a member of Alexander's allied cavalry until the campaign reached Ecbatana in 330 BC. There he and his compatriots were disch...
Nicomachus (son of Aristotle)
Nicomachus (Greek: Νικόμαχος; fl. c. 325 BC), was the son of Aristotle.
The Suda — a massive 10th-century Byzantine encyclopedia of the ancient Mediterranean world — states that Nicomachus was...
Chaeron of Megalopolis
For other uses, see ChaeronChaeron of Megalopolis was the man who, shortly before the birth of Alexander, 356 BC, was sent by Philip to consult the Delphic oracle about the snake which he had seen wi...
Aristotle's wheel paradox
Aristotle's wheel paradox is a paradox from the Greek work Mechanica traditionally attributed to Aristotle. There are two wheels, one within the other, whose rims take the shape of two circles with di...
Aristotle's wheel paradox - Wikipedia
Rational animal
The term rational animal (animal rationabile) refers to a classical definition of humanity or human nature, associated with Aristotelianism.
While the Latin term itself originates in medieval sc...
Erigyius
Erigyius (in Greek Eριγυιoς; died 328 BC), a Mytilenaean, son of Larichus, was an officer in Alexander the Great's army. He had been driven into banishment by Philip II, king of Macedon, because of hi...
Anaxarchus
Anaxarchus (/ˌænəɡˈzɑrkəs/; Greek: Ἀνάξαρχος; c. 380 – c. 320 BC) was a Greek philosopher of the school of Democritus. Together with Pyrrho, he accompanied Alexander the Great into Asia. The repor...
Philinna
Philinna (Greek: Φίλιννα) or Philine (Greek: Φιλίνη) was the name of many Greek females, as, for instance, of the female dancer of Philinna of Larissa in Thessaly, who was the mother of Philip III Arr...
Dinocrates
Dinocrates of Rhodes (also Deinocrates, Dimocrates, Cheirocrates and Stasicrates; Greek: Δεινοκράτης ὁ Ῥόδιος, fl. last quarter of the 4th century BC) was a Greek architect and technical adviser for A...
Aeschrion of Samos
Aeschrion (Gr. Αισχρίων) was an iambic poet, and a native of Samos. He is mentioned by Athenaeus, who has preserved some choliambic verses of his, in which he defends the Samian Philaenis against Pol...
Echion (painter)
Echion (Ancient Greek: Έχίων), also known as Aetion, was a celebrated Greek painter spoken of by Lucian, who gives a description of one of his pictures, representing the marriage of Alexander and...
Bion of Borysthenes
Bion of Borysthenes (Greek: Βίων Βορυσθενίτης, gen.: Βίωνος; c. 325 – c. 250 BC), was a Greek philosopher. After being sold into slavery, and then released, he moved to Athens, where he studied in...
Nicanor of Stageira
Nicanor (Latin; Greek: Νικάνωρ Nikanōr) or Nikanor, of Stageira in Macedonia, was despatched by Alexander the Great to proclaim at the Olympic games of 324 BCE the decree for the recall of the exi...
Aristobulus of Cassandreia
For other use, see AristobulusAristobulus of Cassandreia (ca. 375 BC – 301 BC), Greek historian, son of Aristobulus, probably a Phocian settled inCassandreia, accompanied Alexander the Great on his ca...
Lysippos
Lysippos (/laɪˈsɪpɒs/; Greek: Λύσιππος) was a Greek sculptor of the 4th century BC. Together with Scopas and Praxiteles, he is considered one of the three greatest sculptors of the Classical Greek era...
Pyrgoteles
Pyrgoteles (Greek: Πυργοτέλης) one of the most celebrated gem-engravers of ancient Greece, lived in the latter half of the fourth century b. c. The esteem in which he was held may be inferred from tha...
Pyrgoteles - Wikipedia
Pausanias of Athens
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας; fl. c. 420 BCE) was an ancient Athenian of the deme Kerameis, and was the lover of the poet Agathon.Although Pausanias is given a significant speaking part ...
Philip of Acarnania
Philip of Acarnania was friend and physician of Alexander the Great, of whom a well-known story is told by several ancient authors. He was the means of saving the king's life, when he had been seized ...
Leochares
Leochares (Greek: Λεοχάρης) was a Greek sculptor from Athens, who lived in the 4th century BC.
Leochares worked at the construction of the Mausoleum of Maussollos at Halicarnassus, one of the ...
Leochares - Wikipedia
Apelles
Apelles of Kos (/əˈpɛliːz/; Greek: Ἀπελλῆς; fl. 4th century BC) was a renowned painter of ancient Greece. Pliny the Elder, to whom we owe much of our knowledge of this artist (Naturalis Historia 35.36...
Apelles - Wikipedia