Ancient Syracuse
Syracuse (/ˈsɪrəˌkjuːs, -ˌkjuːz/; Italian: Siracusa, [siraˈkuːza]; Sicilian: Sarausa; Latin: Syracusæ; Ancient Greek: Συράκουσαι, Syrakousai; medieval Greek: Συρακοῦσαι) is a historic...
Ancient Syracuse - Wikipedia
The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Plato
The school founded by this antique philosopher, became a prototype of modern higher education. Contemporaries named him «the divine teacher»: in his works it...
List of tyrants of Syracuse
Syracuse (Gr. Συρακοῦσαι) was an ancient Greek city-state, located on the east coast of Sicily. The city was founded by settlers from Corinth in 734 or 733 BC, and was conquered by the Romans in 212 B...
Trial of Socrates
The trial and execution of Socrates took place in 399 BC. Socrates was tried on two charges: corrupting the youth and impiety (in Greek, asebeia). More specifically, Socrates' accusers cited two "imp...
Trial of Socrates - Wikipedia
Achaeus of Syracuse
Achaeus of Syracuse (Ancient Greek: Ἀχαιός; lived 4th century BC) was an ancient Greek tragedian native of Syracuse. The Suda ascribes to him 10 plays, while the Pseudo-Eudocia 14. He may be the ...
Petalism
In ancient Syracuse petalism was a form of banishment similar to ostracism in Athens. In a special vote, citizens wrote on leaves (Greek "petala", "leaves") the names of those they wished to banish fr...
The Top 6 Theories About The Lost City Of Atlantis
All that we know of the legendary island civilization of Atlantis comes from a few pages in Timaeus and Critias, two of the famous “dialogues” written by Greek philosopher Plato in the fourth century ...
Menecrates of Syracuse
Menecrates of Syracuse (/məˈnɛkrətiːz/; Greek: Μενεκράτης) was the physician at the court of Philip of Macedon, 359—336 BC. He seems to have been a successful practitioner, but to have made himself ri...
Calippus of Syracuse
Callippus (/kəˈlɪp.əs/; Greek: Κάλιππος Συρακόσιος) was a tyrant of Syracuse who ruled briefly for thirteen months from 354 to 352 BC. He was a native Athenian, who traveled with Dion to Sicily ...
Calippus of Syracuse - Wikipedia
Epicydes
Epicydes or Epikudês (3rd century BC) was a Carthaginian general in the Second Punic War.A Syracusan by origin, he was born and educated at Carthage as the son of a Carthaginian mother. His grandfathe...
Epicydes - Wikipedia
Archimedes
Archimedes of Syracuse (/ˌɑːkɪˈmiːdiːz/; Greek: Ἀρχιμήδης; c. 287 BC – c. 212 BC) was an Ancient Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer. Althoug...
Archimedes - Wikipedia
Timycha
Timycha of Sparta (Greek: Τιμύχα Λακεδαιμονία; early 4th century BCE), along with her husband Myllias of Croton (Μυλλίας Κροτωνιάτης), was a member of a group of Pythagorean pilgrims, who were att...
Cephalus
Cephalus (/ˈsɛfələs/; Ancient Greek: Κέφαλος, Kephalos) is a name, used both for the hero-figure in Greek mythology and carried as a theophoric name by historical persons. The word kephalos is Gr...
Cephalus - Wikipedia
Casmene
Casmenae or Kasmenai (Casmene in Italian) was an ancient Greek colony located on the Hyblaean Mountains, founded in 644 BC by the Syracusans at a strategic position for the control of central Sic...
Casmene - Wikipedia
Rhinthon
Rhinthon (Greek: Ῥίνθων, gen.: Ῥίνθωνος; c. 323 – 285 BC) was a Hellenistic dramatist.The son of a potter, he was probably a native of Syracuse and afterwards settled at Tarentum. He invented the hila...
Dion of Syracuse
Dion (/ˈdaɪɒn, ən/; Greek: Δίων ὁ Συρακόσιος; 408–354 BC), tyrant of Syracuse in Sicily, was the son of Hipparinus, and brother-in-law of Dionysius I of Syracuse.
Dion was the son of the Syrac...
Charmides (dialogue)
The Charmides (/ˈkɑrmɪdiːz/; Greek: Χαρμίδης) is a dialogue of Plato, in which Socrates engages a handsome and popular boy in a conversation about the meaning of sophrosyne, a Greek word usually trans...
Battle of Messana
The Battle of Messana in 265-264 BC was the first military clash between the Roman Republic and Carthage. It marked the start of the First Punic War. In that period, and after the recent successes in ...
Battle of Messana - Wikipedia
Axiochus (dialogue)
Axiochus (Greek: Ἀξίοχος) is a Socratic dialogue attributed to Plato, but which is considered spurious. The work dates from the Hellenistic era, c. 1st century BC. The author was probably a Platon...
Battle of Himera (480 BC)
The Battle of Himera (480 BC), supposedly fought on the same day as the more famous Battle of Salamis, or at the same time as the Battle of Thermopylae, saw the Greek forces of Gelon, King of Syracuse...
Battle of Himera (480 BC) - Wikipedia
Vis (town)
Vis is a town on the eponymous island in the Adriatic Sea in southern Croatia. It has a population of 1,934 residents (as of 2011). The town is also the seat of the eponymous Vis municipality, one of ...
Vis (town) - Wikipedia
Plato
Plato (/ˈpleɪtoʊ/; Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn, "broad"; 428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BCE) was a philosopher, as well as mathematician, in Classical Greece. He is considered an essential figure in the devel...
Plato - Wikipedia
Battle of the Elleporus
The Battle of the Elleporus was fought in 389 BC between the forces of Dionysius I of Syracuse and the armies of the Italiote League. The armies of Syracuse triumphed, and Dionysius' control was exte...
Battle of the Elleporus - Wikipedia