Anglo-Saxon paganism
Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A varian...
Anglo-Saxon paganism - Wikipedia
Sutton Hoo - In Focus: Sutton Hoo
Welcome to In Focus. In this series we take a closer look at particular sites, finds and objects from the world of Archaeology.
Beowulf
The first full trailer for Robert Zemeckis' CGI film version of Beowulf. See this article for more: http://www.bitsofnews.com/content/view/5898/
Germanic paganism
Germanic paganism refers to the theology and religious practices of the Germanic peoples from the Iron Age until their Christianization during the Medieval period. It has been described as being "a sy...
Germanic paganism - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon Christianity
The history of Christianity in England from the Roman departure to the Norman Conquest is often told as one of conflict between the Celtic Christianity spread by the Irish mission, and Roman Christia...
Anglo-Saxon Christianity - Wikipedia
Christianization of Anglo-Saxon England
The Christianisation of Anglo-Saxon England was a process spanning the 7th century.It is essentially the result of the Gregorian mission of 597, which was joined by the efforts of the Hiberno-Scotti...
Germanic pantheon
The article lists gods and goddesses (Ansewez, Wanizaz) that may be reconstructed for Proto-Germanic or Common Germanic Migration period paganism, or which figure in both West and North Germanic mytho...
Female spirits in Germanic paganism
In Norse mythology, a dís ("lady", plural dísir) is a ghost, spirit or deity associated with fate who can be both benevolent and antagonistic towards mortal people. Dísir may act as protective spirits...
Female spirits in Germanic paganism - Wikipedia
Germanic poetry
In prosody, alliterative verse is a form of verse that uses alliteration as the principal ornamental device to help indicate the underlying metrical structure, as opposed to other devices such as rhym...
Germanic poetry - Wikipedia
Early Anglo-Saxon burial
Burial in Early Anglo-Saxon England refers to the grave and burial customs followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the mid 5th and 7th centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England. There was "an immense range...
Early Anglo-Saxon burial - Wikipedia
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England refers to the belief and practice of magic by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eleventh centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England. In this period, magical practices we...
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England - Wikipedia
Germanic king
Germanic kingship refers to the customs and practices surrounding kings among the pre-Christianization Germanic tribes of the Migration period (circa AD 300-700) and the kingdoms of the Early Middle A...
Dryhten
*Druhtinaz (Old English: dryhten, Old Norse: dróttinn, Old Middle English: drihten, Middle English: driȝten) is a Proto-Germanic term meaning a military leader or warlord and is derived from *druhti ...
Anglo-Saxon monarchs
A succession of monarchs ruled the various independent kingdoms which arose in England following the end of Roman rule in Britain in the 5th century. The most prominent of these kingdoms were Kent, E...
Anglo-Saxon law
Anglo-Saxon law (Old English ǣ, later lagu "law"; dōm "decree, judgement") is a body of written rules and customs that were in place during the Anglo-Saxon period in England, before the Norman conques...
Doom Book
The Doom Book, Code of Alfred or Legal Code of Ælfred the Great was the code of laws ("dooms", laws or judgments) compiled by Alfred the Great (c. 893 AD) from three prior Saxon codes, to which he pre...
List of places named after Odin
Many toponyms ("place names") contain the name of *Wōdanaz (Norse Óðinn, Old English Wōden).
Odensåker, Skaraborg
List of places named after Odin - Wikipedia
English toponymy
The toponymy of England, like the English language itself, derives from various linguistic origins. Modern interpretations are apt to be inexact: many English toponyms have been corrupted and broken d...
English toponymy - Wikipedia
Week-day names
The English language days of the week are named after gods and mythological figures, the product and confluence of an array of contributing cultures and traditions; while some other contemporary names...
Beowulf
Beowulf (/ˈbeɪ.ɵwʊlf/; in Old English [ˈbeːo̯ˌwʊlf]) is an Old English epic poem consisting of 3182 alliterative long lines. It is possibly the oldest surviving long poem in Old English and is common...
Beowulf - Wikipedia
Finnesburg Fragment
The Finnesburg — or Finnsburh — Fragment is a portion of an Old English heroic poem about a fight in which Hnæf and his 60 retainers are besieged at "Finn's fort" and attempt to hold off their attacke...
The Reckoning of Time
The Reckoning of Time (Latin: De temporum ratione) is an Anglo-Saxon era treatise written in Latin by the Northumbrian monk Bede in 725. The treatise includes an introduction to the traditional an...
Wyrd
Wyrd is a concept in Anglo-Saxon culture roughly corresponding to fate or personal destiny. Their concept of fate, wyrd, was stronger than that of the Classical Pagans as there was no resisting it. T...
Religion in Mercia
Throughout its history the Kingdom of Mercia has been a battleground between conflicting religious ideologies.
It is likely that the Anglian occupation of Mercia saw the displacement of, or integr...
Religion in Mercia - Wikipedia
Hrunting
Hrunting was a sword given to Beowulf by Unferth in the ancient Old English epic poem Beowulf. Beowulf used it in battle against Grendel's Mother.Beowulf is described receiving the sword in lines 1455...
Lorsch Bee Blessing
The Lorsch Bee Blessing (German: Lorscher Bienensegen), believed to have been written in the 9th century, was discovered in a manuscript (on fol. 58r of the Pal. lat. 220 in the Vatican Library, a cop...
Lorsch Bee Blessing - Wikipedia