Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo-Saxons were a people who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century. They included people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe, and their descendants; as...
Anglo-Saxons - Wikipedia
The Viking Berserkers – Fierce Warriors Or Drug-Fuelled Madmen?
Today, the word ‘berserk’ is used to describe anyone in an irrational, agitated state of mind who cannot or does not control his or her actions.
View From Space Hints At A New Viking Site In North America
A thousand years after the Vikings braved the icy seas from Greenland to the New World in search of timber and plunder, satellite technology has found intriguing evidence of a long-elusive prize in ar...
Genetic study reveals 30% of white British DNA has German ancestry
The Romans, Vikings and Normans may have ruled or invaded the British for hundreds of years, but they left barely a trace on our DNA, the first detailed study of the genetics of British people has rev...
Anglo-Saxon art - Gold hoard
The man who discovered the Staffordshire hoard Terry Herbert, metal detector enthusiast, uncovered a hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold so large it will redefine the...
Viking Age - Timeline
This timeline presents the main events of the History of the Vikings from 793 AD to the establishment of Oslo as a major trade center. The timeline is presen...
History of Anglo-Saxon England
In the history of Great Britain, Anglo-Saxon England refers to the historical land roughly corresponding to present-day England, as it existed from the 5th to the 11th century.The Anglo-Saxons were th...
History of Anglo-Saxon England - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain
The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain was the process by which the coastal lowlands of Britain developed from a Romano-British to a Germanic culture following the Roman withdrawal in the early 5th cen...
Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain - Wikipedia
Ingaevones
The Ingaevones or, as Pliny has it, apparently more accurately, Ingvaeones ("people of Yngvi"), as described in Tacitus's Germania, written c. 98 CE, were a West Germanic cultural group living ...
Ingaevones - Wikipedia
Heptarchy
The Heptarchy (from the Greek ἑπτά hepta, "seven" and ἄρχω arkho, "to rule") is a collective name applied to the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of south, east, and central England during late antiquity and the ...
Heptarchy - Wikipedia
Viking Age
The Viking Age is the period from 793 AD to 1066 AD in European history, especially Northern European and Scandinavian history, following the Germanic Iron Age. It is the period of history when Scandi...
Viking Age - Wikipedia
Danelaw
The Danelaw, as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws o...
Danelaw - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon art
Anglo-Saxon art covers art produced within the Anglo-Saxon period of English history, beginning with the Migration period style that the Anglo-Saxons brought with them from the continent in the 5th c...
Anglo-Saxon art - Wikipedia
Old English
Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc) or Anglo-Saxon is an early form of the English language that was spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons and their descendants in parts of what are now England a...
Old English - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon law
Anglo-Saxon law (Old English ǣ, later lagu "law"; dōm "decree, judgement") is a body of written rules and customs that were in place during the Anglo-Saxon period in England, before the Norman conques...
Anglo-Saxon literature
Old English literature (sometimes referred to as Anglo-Saxon literature) encompasses literature written in Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) in Anglo-Saxon England from the 7th century to the deca...
Anglo-Saxon literature - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon paganism
Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A varian...
Anglo-Saxon paganism - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon Christianity
The history of Christianity in England from the Roman departure to the Norman Conquest is often told as one of conflict between the Celtic Christianity spread by the Irish mission, and Roman Christia...
Anglo-Saxon Christianity - Wikipedia
The Viking Berserkers – Fierce Warriors Or Drug-Fuelled Madmen?
Today, the word ‘berserk’ is used to describe anyone in an irrational, agitated state of mind who cannot or does not control his or her actions.
Kingdom of the Isles
The Kingdom of the Isles comprised the Hebrides, the islands of the Firth of Clyde and the Isle of Man from the 9th to the 13th centuries AD. The islands were known to the Norse as the Suðreyjar, or "...
Kingdom of the Isles - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon riddles
Anglo-Saxon Riddles are part of Anglo-Saxon literature. The most famous Anglo-Saxon riddles are found in the Exeter Book, though Latin Riddles were also composed by Anglo-Saxons, most famously Aldhelm...
Bewcastle Cross
The Bewcastle Cross is an Anglo-Saxon cross which is still in its original position within the churchyard of St Cuthbert's church at Bewcastle, in the English county of Cumbria. The cross, which prob...
Bewcastle Cross - Wikipedia
Ælfthryth, Countess of Flanders
Ælfthryth of Wessex (877 – 7 June 929), also known as Elftrudis (Elftrude, Elfrida), was an English princess and a countess consort of Flanders.
She was the youngest child of Alfred the Great, the...
Portreeve
A portreeve or port warden is the title of an historical official in England and Wales possessing authority (political, administrative, or fiscal) over a town. The details of the office have fluctuate...
Peace-weaver
In Anglo-Saxon tradition, peace-weavers were women who were married to a member of an enemy tribe for the purpose of establishing peace between feuding groups. It was hoped that by relating two tribes...
Housecarl
In medieval Scandinavia, housecarls (Old Norse: húskarlar, singular húskarl; also anglicised as huscarl (Old English form) and sometimes spelled huscarle or houscarl) were either non-servile manse...
Housecarl - Wikipedia
Brussels Cross
The Brussels Cross or Drahmal Cross is an Anglo-Saxon cross-reliquary of the early 11th century, now in the treasury of the St. Michael and St. Gudula Cathedral, Brussels. Badly damaged and with its o...
Brussels Cross - Wikipedia
Witenagemot
The Witenagemot (Old English witena gemōt [ˈwitena jeˈmoːt] "meeting of wise men"), also known as the Witan (more properly the title of its members) was a political institution in Anglo-Saxon England ...
Witenagemot - Wikipedia
Æthelwynn
Æthelwynn (often spelled Ethylwynn, Ethylwyn, or Ethelwynn) was a tenth century noblewoman known for her embroidery work and encounter with Saint Dunstan.According to Saint Dunstan's biographer, Æthe...