Aristotle
Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384 – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the Macedonian city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on...
Aristotle - Wikipedia
'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
Term logic
In philosophy, term logic, also known as traditional logic or Aristotelian logic, is a loose name for the way of doing logic that began with Aristotle and that was dominant until the advent of modern ...
Non-Aristotelian logic
The term non-Aristotelian logic, sometimes shortened to null-A, means any non-classical system of logic which rejects one of Aristotle's premises (see term logic). The main feature of non-Aristotelian...
Organon
The Organon (Greek: Ὄργανον, meaning "instrument, tool, organ") is the standard collection of Aristotle's six works on logic. The name Organon was given by Aristotle's followers, the Peripatetics. The...
Aristotle's theory of universals
Aristotle's theory of universals is one of the classic solutions to the problem of universals. Universals are types, properties, or relations that are common to their various instances. In Aristotle'...
Physics (Aristotle)
The Physics (Greek: Φυσικὴ ἀκρόασις Phusike akroasis; Latin: Physica, or Physicae Auscultationes, meaning "lectures on nature") of Aristotle is one of the foundational books of Western science and phi...
Physics (Aristotle) - Wikipedia
Classical element
Many philosophies and worldviews have a set of classical elements believed to reflect the simplest essential parts and principles of which anything can consist or upon which the constitution and funda...
Classical element - Wikipedia
Potentiality and actuality
In philosophy, potentiality and actuality are principles of a dichotomy which Aristotle used to analyze motion, causality, ethics, and physiology in his Physics, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics and De...
Four causes
"Four causes" refers to an influential principle in Aristotelian thought whereby causes of change or movement are categorized into four fundamental types of answer to the question "why?". Aristotle wr...
Metaphysics (Aristotle)
Metaphysics (Greek: τὰ μετὰ τὰ φυσικά; Latin: Metaphysica) is one of the principal works of Aristotle and the first major work of the branch of philosophy with the same name. The principal subject is ...
Metaphysics (Aristotle) - Wikipedia
Potentiality and actuality (Aristotle)
In philosophy, potentiality and actuality are principles of a dichotomy which Aristotle used to analyze motion, causality, ethics, and physiology in his Physics, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics and De...
Historia Plantarum
Historia Plantarum (Latin: History of/Treatise on Plants) has been used as all or part of the name of several books, which include:
Medicine in ancient Greece
Ancient Greek medicine was a compilation of theories that were constantly expanding through new ideologies and trials. Many components were considered in Ancient Greek Medicine, intertwining the spir...
Medicine in ancient Greece - Wikipedia
Aristotelian ethics
Aristotle first used the term "ethics" to name a field of study developed by his predecessors Socrates and Plato. Philosophical ethics is the attempt to offer a rational response to the question of ho...
Politics (Aristotle)
Politics (Greek: Πολιτικά) is a work of political philosophy by Aristotle, a fourth-century BC Greek philosopher. The end of the Nicomachean Ethics declared that the inquiry into ethics necessaril...
Politics (Aristotle) - Wikipedia
Rhetoric (Aristotle)
Aristotle's Rhetoric (Greek: Ῥητορική; Latin: Ars Rhetorica) is an ancient Greek treatise on the art of persuasion, dating from the 4th century BC. The English title varies: typically it is titled Rhe...
Poetics (Aristotle)
Aristotle's Poetics (Greek: Περὶ ποιητικῆς, Latin: De Poetica; c. 335 BCE) is the earliest surviving work of dramatic theory and the first extant philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory...
Poetics (Aristotle) - Wikipedia
Aristotle's views on women
Aristotle's views on women influenced later Western thinkers, who quoted him as an authority until the end of the Middle Ages, and are thus an important topic in women's history. He saw women as subje...
Aristotle's views on women - Wikipedia
Corpus Aristotelicum
The Corpus Aristotelicum is the collection of Aristotle's works that have survived from antiquity through Medieval manuscript transmission. These texts, as opposed to Aristotle's lost works, are techn...
Corpus Aristotelicum - Wikipedia
Aristotelianism
Aristotelianism (/ˌærɨstəˈtiːliənɨzəm/ ARR-i-stə-TEE-li-ə-niz-əm) is a tradition of philosophy that takes its defining inspiration from the work of Aristotle. The works of Aristotle were initially def...
University of Magnaura
The Imperial University of Constantinople, sometimes known as the University of the Palace Hall of Magnaura (Πανδιδακτήριον της Μαγναύρας), was founded in 425 AD in the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantin...
Endoxa
Endoxa (Greek: ἔνδοξα) derives from the word doxa (δόξα, meaning "beliefs", "opinions"). Whereas Plato condemned doxa as a starting point from which to attain truth, Aristotle used the term endoxa...
Natural slavery
Natural slavery is term used by Aristotle in the Politics to express the belief that some people are slaves by nature, contrasting them with those who were slaves solely by law or convention.
In b...
On Melissus, Xenophanes, and Gorgias
On Melissus, Xenophanes, and Gorgias (Greek: Περὶ Μελίσσου, Ξενοφάνους καὶ Γοργίου, Latin: De Melisso, Xenophane, Gorgia) is a short work falsely attributed to Aristotle. The work was likely writt...
On Melissus, Xenophanes, and Gorgias - Wikipedia
Porphyrian tree
The Porphyrian tree, Tree of Porphyry or Arbor Porphyriana is a classic device for illustrating what is also called a "scale of being". It was suggested—if not first, then most famously in the Europe...
Porphyrian tree - Wikipedia