Athenian democracy
Athenian democracy developed around the fifth century BC in the Greek city-state (known as a polis) of Athens, comprising the city of Athens and the surrounding territory of Attica. Athenian democracy...
Athenian democracy - Wikipedia
Heliaia
Heliaia or Heliaea (Ancient Greek: Ήλιαία; Doric: Ἁλία Halia) was the supreme court of ancient Athens. Τhe view generally held among scholars is that the court drew its name from the ancient Gree...
Heliaia - Wikipedia
Thucydides
Thucydides (/θjuːˈsɪdɨdiːz/; Greek: Θουκυδίδης, Thoukudídēs, [tʰuːkydídɛːs]; c. 460 – c. 395 BC) was an Athenian historian, political philosopher and general. His History of the Peloponnesian War reco...
Thucydides - Wikipedia
Areopagite constitution
The Areopagite constitution is the modern name for a period in ancient Athens described by Aristotle in his Constitution of the Athenians. According to that work, the Athenian political scene was dom...
Pnyx
The Pnyx (/nɪks, pəˈnɪks/; Ancient Greek: Πνύξ; Modern Greek: Πνύκα, Pnyka) is a hill in central Athens, the capital of Greece. Beginning as early as 507 BC, the Athenians gathered on the Pny...
Pnyx - Wikipedia
Thrasybulus
Thrasybulus (/ˌθræsɨˈbjuːləs/; Greek: Θρασύβουλος, "brave-willed"; c. 440 – 388 BC) was an Athenian general and democratic leader. In 411 BC, in the wake of an oligarchic coup at Athens, the pro-demo...
Thrasybulus - Wikipedia
Boule (ancient Greece)
In cities of ancient Greece, the boule (Greek: βουλή, boulē; plural βουλαί, boulai) was a council of citizens (βουλευταί, bouleutai) appointed to run daily affairs of the city. Originally a counc...
Cleisthenes
Cleisthenes (/ˈklaɪsθəˌniːz/; Greek: Κλεισθένης, also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was a noble Athenian of the Alcmaeonid family. He is credited with reforming the constitution of ancient Athens and se...
Cleisthenes - Wikipedia
Thucydides, son of Melesias
Thucydides, son of Melesias (/θjuːˈsɪdɨdiːz/; Greek: Θουκυδίδης) was a prominent politician of ancient Athens and the leader for a number of years of the powerful conservative faction. While it is...
Ecclesia (ancient Athens)
The ecclesia or ekklesia (Greek: ἐκκλησία) was the principal assembly of the democracy of ancient Athens during its "Golden Age" (480–404 BCE). It was the popular assembly, open to all male citize...
Ecclesia (ancient Athens) - Wikipedia
Phyle
Phyle (Greek φυλή phulē, "clan, race, people", derived from ancient Greek φύεσθαι "to descend, to originate") is an ancient Greek term for clan or tribe. They were usually ruled by a basileus. Some of...
Phyle - Wikipedia
Dokimasia
In Ancient Greece, dokimasia (Greek: δοκιμασία) was the name used at Athens to denote the process of ascertaining the capacity of the citizens for the exercise of public rights and duties.If, for inst...
Dokimasia - Wikipedia
Ostracism
Ostracism (Greek: ὀστρακισμός, ostrakismos) was a procedure under the Athenian democracy in which any citizen could be expelled from the city-state of Athens for ten years. While some instances cl...
Ostracism - Wikipedia
Themistocles
Themistocles (/θəˈmɪstəˌkliːz/; Greek: Θεμιστοκλῆς [tʰemistoklɛ̂ːs] Themistokles; "Glory of the Law"; c. 524–459 BC) was an Athenian politician and general. He was one of a new breed of...
Themistocles - Wikipedia
Graphē paranómōn
The graphē paranómōn (Ancient Greek: γραφὴ παρανόμων), was a form of legal action believed to have been introduced at Athens under the democracy somewhere around the year 415 BC; it has been seen...
Graphē paranómōn - Wikipedia
Megacles
Megacles or Megakles (Μεγακλῆς) was the name of several notable men of ancient Athens:
The first Megacles was possibly a legendary Archon of Athens from 922 BC to 892 BC.
Xenophon
Xenophon (/ˈzɛnəfən, -ˌfɒn/; Greek: Ξενοφῶν [ksenopʰɔ̂ːn], Xenophōn; c. 430 – 354 BC), son of Gryllus, of the deme Erchia of Athens, also known as Xenophon of Athens, was a Greek historian, soldi...
Xenophon - Wikipedia
Damon of Athens
Damon (Greek: Δάμων, gen.: Δάμωνος), son of Damonides, was a Greek musicologist of the fifth century BCE. He belonged to the Athenian deme of Oē (sometimes spelled "Oa"). He is credited as teacher and...
Constitution of the Athenians
The Constitution of the Athenians (The Athenian constitution; Greek: Ἀθηναίων πολιτεία Athenaion Politeia) is the name given to two texts from Classical antiquity: one probably by Aristotle or a s...
Constitution of the Athenians - Wikipedia
Hyperbolus
Hyperbolus (Greek: Ὑπέρβολoς, Hyperbolos) was an Athenian politician active during the first half of the Peloponnesian war, coming to particular prominence after the death of Cleon.Like Cleon, he coun...
Hyperbolus - Wikipedia
Prytaneis
The Prytaneis (πρυτάνεις; sing.: πρύτανις prytanis) were the executives of the boule of ancient Athens. The term (like basileus or tyrannos) is probably of Pre-Greek origin (possibly cognate to Etrusc...
Mytilenian Debate
The Mytilenian Debate (also spelled "Mytilenean Debate" or "Mytilenaean Debate") in the Athenian Assembly concerned reprisals against the city-state of Mytilene, which had attempted unsuccessfully to ...
Athenian coup of 411 BC
The Athenian coup of 411 BC was the result of a revolution that took place during the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta. The coup overthrew the democratic government of ancient Athens and re...
Athenian coup of 411 BC - Wikipedia
Cimon
Cimon (/ˈsaɪmən/; Greek: Κίμων, Kimōn; 510 – 450 BC), was an Athenian statesman and strategos in mid-5th century BC Greece, the son of Miltiades, the victor of the Battle of Marathon. Cimon play...
Cimon - Wikipedia
Xanthippus
Xanthippus (/zænˈθɪpəs/; Greek: Ξάνθιππος; c. 525-475 BCE) was a wealthy Athenian politician and general during the early part of the 5th century BC. His name means "Yellow Horse." He was the son...
Xanthippus - Wikipedia
Prytaneum
Prytaneum and Prytanis (Gr. root irpo, first or chief). In general in ancient Greece, each state, city or village possessed its own central hearth and sacred fire, representing the unity and vitality ...