Atomic orbital model
An atomic orbital is a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of f...
Atomic orbital model - Wikipedia
Atomic theory
In chemistry and physics, atomic theory is a scientific theory of the nature of matter, which states that matter is composed of discrete units called atoms. It began as a philosophical concept in anci...
Atomic theory - Wikipedia
Hydrogen-like atom
A hydrogen-like ion is any atomic nucleus with one electron and thus is isoelectronic with hydrogen. Except for the hydrogen atom itself (which is neutral), these ions carry the positive charge , wher...
Quantum number
Quantum numbers describe values of conserved quantities in the dynamics of a quantum system. In the case of quantum numbers of electrons, they can be defined as "The sets of numerical values which giv...
Electron shell
In chemistry and atomic physics, an electron shell, also called a principal energy level may be thought of as an orbit followed by electrons around an atom's nucleus. The closest shell to the nucleus ...
Electron shell - Wikipedia
Relativistic quantum chemistry
Relativistic quantum chemistry invokes quantum chemical and relativistic mechanical arguments to explain elemental properties and structure, especially for the heavier elements of the periodic table. ...
Relativistic quantum chemistry - Wikipedia
Azimuthal quantum number
The azimuthal quantum number is a quantum number for an atomic orbital that determines its orbital angular momentum and describes the shape of the orbital. The azimuthal quantum number is the second ...
Plum pudding model
The plum pudding model was a model of the atom that incorporated the recently discovered electron, and was proposed by J. J. Thomson in 1904. Thomson had discovered the electron in 1897. The plum pudd...
Plum pudding model - Wikipedia
Rutherford model
3D animation of an atom incorporating the Rutherford modelThe Rutherford model is a model of the atom devised by Ernest Rutherford. Rutherford directed the famous Geiger–Marsden experiment in 1909 ...
Rutherford model - Wikipedia
Bohr model
In atomic physics, the Rutherford–Bohr model or Bohr model, introduced by Niels Bohr in 1913, depicts the atom as a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons that travel in circular or...
Bohr model - Wikipedia
Isotope
Isotopes are variants of a particular chemical element which differ in neutron number, although all isotopes of a given element have the same number of protons in each atom. The term isotope is formed...
Isotope - Wikipedia
Electron
The electron is a subatomic particle, symbol e− or β−, with a negative elementary electric charge. Electrons belong to the first generation of the lepton particle family, and are gen...
Electron - Wikipedia
Valence electron
In chemistry, a valence electron is an electron that is associated with an atom, and that can participate in the formation of a chemical bond; in a single covalent bond, both atoms in the bond contrib...
Valence electron - Wikipedia
Atomic orbital
An atomic orbital is a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of f...
Atomic orbital - Wikipedia
Atomic nucleus
The nucleus is the very dense region consisting of protons and neutrons at the center of an atom. It was discovered in 1911 as a result of Ernest Rutherford's interpretation of the 1909 Geiger–Marsden...
Atomic nucleus - Wikipedia
Inert pair effect
The inert pair effect is the tendency of the electrons in the outermost atomic s orbital to remain un-ionized or unshared in compounds of post-transition metals. The term inert pair effect is often us...
Clebsch-Gordan coefficients
In physics, the Clebsch–Gordan coefficients are sets of numbers that arise in angular momentum coupling under the laws of quantum mechanics.In more mathematical terms, the CG coefficients are used in ...