Axon
An axon (from Greek ἄξων áxōn, axis), also known as a nerve fibre, is a long, slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that typically conducts electrical impulses away from the neuron's cell bod...
Axon - Wikipedia
Neurons Forming Connections In Vitro
Neurons forming connections in vitro. via mymedicalwall
Neurons forming connections in vitro.... - Neuroscience News and Research
Neurons forming connections in vitro. via mymedicalwall
New 'Artificial Synapses' Could Let Supercomputers Mimic the Human Brain
Brain-like machines with human-like abilities to solve problems could become a reality, researchers say.
Neuroscientist Shows What Fasting Does To Your Brain And Why Big Pharma Won’t Study It
Fasting kills off old and damaged immune cells, and when the body rebounds,… it uses stem cells to create brand new, completely healthy cells. Wow…! What an opportunity to rebuild your body  by leavin...
Boston University's 3D map reveals tiny connections between cells
Harvard University researchers hope the map could be used to identify unusual connections between brain cells that could shed light on disorders such as bipolar and depression.
Axoplasmic transport - The Kinesin Linear Motor
http://creation.com Inside a living cell is an amazing transportation system. Proteins have to be delivered to the correct part of the cell to perform their ...
Axon guidance - Growth cone guidance by an adhesive substrate
In this video a DRG growth cone crosses from a fibronectin to a laminin substrate. Filopodial contact with laminin leads the way.
Growth cone - Nerve growth cones-narrated version
This ten minute presentation describes axonal growth cones and how they navigate through developing tissues to reach the target areas where they make synapse...
Synapse
From a DVD that comes with the illustrated medical atlas, The Human Brain, DK Publishing UK.
Synapse - Animation
Neural synapse. Acetlycoline http://youtube.com/group/scienceeducation.
Axoplasm
Axoplasm is the cytoplasm within the axon of a neuron (nerve cell). Neural processes (axons and dendrites) contain about 99.6% of the cell’s cytoplasm, and 99.7% of that is in the axons.Axoplasm has ...
Neurofilament
Neurofilaments (NF) are the 10 nanometer or intermediate filaments found in neurons. They are a major component of the neuronal cytoskeleton, and are believed to function primarily to provide structur...
Neurofilament - Wikipedia
Axolemma
The axolemma is the cell membrane surrounding an axon. It is responsible for maintaining the membrane potential of the neuron, and it contains ion channels through which ions can flow. When this occur...
Myelin
Myelin is a dielectric (electrically insulating) material that forms a layer, the myelin sheath, usually around only the axon of a neuron. It is essential for the proper functioning of the nervous s...
Myelin - Wikipedia
Myelin sheath gap
The nodes of Ranvier also known as myelin sheath gaps, are the gaps (approximately 1 micrometer in length) formed between the myelin sheaths generated by different cells. A myelin sheath is a many-l...
Myelin sheath gap - Wikipedia
Axon terminal
Axon terminals (also called synaptic boutons) are distal terminations of the branches of an axon. An axon nerve fiber is a long, slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that conducts electrical...
Axon terminal - Wikipedia
Sodium channel
Sodium channels are integral membrane proteins that form ion channels, conducting sodium ions (Na) through a cell's plasma membrane. They are classified according to the trigger that opens the channel...
Sodium channel - Wikipedia
Voltage-gated potassium channel
Voltage-gated potassium channels are transmembrane channels specific for potassium and sensitive to voltage changes in the cell's membrane potential. During action potentials, they play a crucial rol...
Resting potential
The relatively static membrane potential of quiescent cells is called the resting membrane potential (or resting voltage), as opposed to the specific dynamic electrochemical phenomena called action po...
Resting potential - Wikipedia
Action potential
In physiology, an action potential is a short-lasting event in which the electrical membrane potential of a cell rapidly rises and falls, following a consistent trajectory. Action potentials occur in...
Action potential - Wikipedia
Saltatory conduction
Saltatory conduction (from the Latin saltare, to hop or leap) is the propagation of action potentials along myelinated axons from one node of Ranvier to the next node, increasing the conduction veloci...
Axoplasmic transport
Axoplasmic transport, also called axonal transport, is a cellular process responsible for movement of mitochondria, lipids, synaptic vesicles, proteins, and other cell parts (i.e. organelles) to and f...
Axoplasmic transport - Wikipedia
Axon guidance
Axon guidance (also called axon pathfinding) is a subfield of neural development concerning the process by which neurons send out axons to reach the correct targets. Axons often follow very precise ...
Axon guidance - Wikipedia
Growth cone
A growth cone is a dynamic, actin-supported extension of a developing neurite seeking its synaptic target. Their existence was originally proposed by Spanish histologist Santiago Ramón y Cajal based u...
Growth cone - Wikipedia
Nerve injury
Nerve injury is injury to nervous tissue. There is no single classification system that can describe all the many variations of nerve injury. Most systems attempt to correlate the degree of injury wit...
Nerve injury - Wikipedia
Neuroregeneration
Neuroregeneration refers to the regrowth or repair of nervous tissues, cells or cell products. Such mechanisms may include generation of new neurons, glia, axons, myelin, or synapses. Neuroregeneratio...
Synapse
In the nervous system, a synapse is a structure that permits a neuron (or nerve cell) to pass an electrical or chemical signal to another cell (neural or otherwise). Santiago Ramón y Cajal proposed th...
Synapse - Wikipedia