Buyeo languages
Buyeo or Fuyu languages (부여 in Korean, Fúyú (扶餘) in Chinese) are a hypothetical language family that consists of ancient languages of the northern Korean Peninsula and southern Manchuria and possibly ...
Buyeo languages - Wikipedia
Japonic languages
The Japonic language family includes the Japanese language spoken on the main islands of Japan as well as the Ryukyuan languages spoken in the Ryukyu Islands. The family is widely accepted by linguist...
Japonic languages - Wikipedia
Korean language
Korean (한국어/조선말, see below) is the official language of South Korea and North Korea, as well as one of the two official languages in China's Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture. About 80 million peo...
Korean language - Wikipedia
Hunminjeongeum Haerye
Hunminjeongeum Haerye (lit. "Explanations and Examples of the Correct/Proper Sounds for the Instruction of the People"), also called the Haerye Edition of Hunminjeongeum or simply The Haerye, is a com...
Hunminjeongeum Haerye - Wikipedia
Sillan language
The Sillan language, or Silla, was spoken in the ancient kingdom of Silla (57 BCE – 935 CE), one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. It is generally accepted that Silla language was similar to that of Gog...
Dravido-Korean languages
Koreanic-Dravidian or Dravido-Koreanic is an obsolete language family proposal which links the living or proto-Dravidian language to the Korean language. The hypothesis was originally proposed by Morg...
Kontsevich system
The Kontsevich system (Russian: Система Концевича/Sistema Kontsevicha) for the Cyrillization of the Korean language was created by the Russian scholar Lev Kontsevitch (Russian: Лев Концевич) on th...
Konglish
Konglish (Korean: 콩글리시/콩글리쉬 or more formally Hangul: 한국어식 영어; hanja: 韓國語式英語 "Korean language style English") is the use of English words or words derived from English words in a Korean...
Goguryeo language
The Goguryeo language was spoken in the ancient kingdom of Goguryeo (37 BCE – 668 CE), one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. The language is also known as Old Koguryo, Koguryoic, and Koguryoan.It is unk...
King Sejong Institute
Sejonghakdang (Hangul: 세종학당) is a brand name that the South Korean government launched in order to comprehensively provide Korean language learners and teachers with an integrated study and inform...
King Sejong Institute - Wikipedia
Han unification
Han unification is an effort by the authors of Unicode and the Universal Character Set to map multiple character sets of the so-called CJK languages into a single set of unified characters. Han charac...
CJK characters
In internationalization, CJK is a collective term for the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages, all of which use Chinese characters and derivatives (collectively, CJK characters) in their writing s...
CJK characters - Wikipedia
Korean manual alphabet
The Korean manual alphabet is used by the Deaf in South Korea who speak Korean Sign Language. It is a one-handed alphabet that mimics the shapes of the letters in hangul, and is used when signing Kore...
Korean manual alphabet - Wikipedia
Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese (古文, gǔwén, "ancient text") is the language of the classic literature from the end of the Spring and Autumn period through to the end of the Han Dynasty, a written form of Old Chines...
Classical Chinese - Wikipedia
Korean profanity
Profanity is referred to in the Korean language as 욕 (yok, insults or swearing). Several of these words have linguistic and historical significance. Various words have different origins. The Korean te...
Korean verbs
Verbs in the Korean language come in last place in a clause. Verbs are the most complex part of speech, and a properly conjugated verb may stand on its own as a complete sentence. This article uses th...
Gugyeol
Gugyeol is a system for rendering texts written in Classical Chinese into understandable Korean. It was chiefly used during the Joseon Dynasty, when readings of the Chinese classics were of paramount...
Gugyeol - Wikipedia
Buyeo language
The language of the Buyeo kingdom is very sparsely attested; however, according to Chinese sources it was mutually intelligible with the Goguryeo language to its south. The few words which are known b...
Buyeo language - Wikipedia
Sino-Korean vocabulary
Sino-Korean or Hanja-eo (Korean: 한자어, Hanja: 漢字語) refers to the set of words in the Korean language vocabulary that originated from or were influenced by hanja. The Sino-Korean lexicon consists of bot...
Korean numerals
The Korean language has two regularly used sets of numerals, a native Korean system and Sino-Korean system.
For both native and Sino- Korean numerals, the teens (11 through 19) are represented by ...
Hangul orthography
한글맞춤법(Hangul matchumbeop) refers to overall rule of writing in Korean with Hangul.The current orthography is issued and established by Korean Ministry Culture in 1998. The first of it is Hunminjungeum...
Hangul orthography - Wikipedia
Topic marker
A topic marker is a grammatical particle used to mark the topic of a sentence. It is found in Japanese, Korean, Ryukyuan and, to a limited extent, Classic Chinese languages. It often overlaps with the...
Tally marks
Tally marks, also called hash marks, are a unary numeral system. They are a form of numeral used for counting. They are most useful in counting or tallying ongoing results, such as the score in a game...
Tally marks - Wikipedia
North–South differences in the Korean language
The Korean language has changed between the two states due to the length of time that North and South Korea have been separated.
Korean orthography, as defined by the Korean Language Society in 19...
North–South differences in the Korean language - Wikipedia
International Circle of Korean Linguistics
The International Circle of Korean Linguistics is a scholarly organization dedicated to the promotion of awareness of, the dissemination of information about, and the facilitation of communication amo...
New Korean Orthography
The New Korean Orthography was a spelling reform used in North Korea from 1948–1954. It added five consonants and one vowel letter to the hangul alphabet, making it what is believed to be a more morph...
New Korean Orthography - Wikipedia
Chinese character encoding
In computing, Chinese character encodings can be used to represent text written in the CJK languages — Chinese, Japanese, Korean — and (rarely) obsolete Vietnamese, all of which use Chines...