Buyeo languages
Buyeo or Fuyu languages (부여 in Korean, Fúyú (扶餘) in Chinese) are a hypothetical language family that consists of ancient languages of the northern Korean Peninsula and southern Manchuria and possibly ...
Buyeo languages - Wikipedia
Japonic languages
The Japonic language family includes the Japanese language spoken on the main islands of Japan as well as the Ryukyuan languages spoken in the Ryukyu Islands. The family is widely accepted by linguist...
Japonic languages - Wikipedia
Korean language
Korean (한국어/조선말, see below) is the official language of South Korea and North Korea, as well as one of the two official languages in China's Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture. About 80 million peo...
Korean language - Wikipedia
Korean mixed script
Korean mixed script is a form of writing that uses both Hangul (an alphabetical script) and hanja (logo-syllabic characters).The script has never been used for languages other than Korean. In North K...
Korean mixed script - Wikipedia
Hunminjeongeum Haerye
Hunminjeongeum Haerye (lit. "Explanations and Examples of the Correct/Proper Sounds for the Instruction of the People"), also called the Haerye Edition of Hunminjeongeum or simply The Haerye, is a com...
Hunminjeongeum Haerye - Wikipedia
Kontsevich system
The Kontsevich system (Russian: Система Концевича/Sistema Kontsevicha) for the Cyrillization of the Korean language was created by the Russian scholar Lev Kontsevitch (Russian: Лев Концевич) on th...
Nogeoldae
The Nogeoldae (hanzi: 老乞大; pinyin: Lǎo qǐdà, hangeul: 노걸대, meaning litteraly, Old Khitan) is an old foreign language textbook published in Korea. At first it dealt only with the Chinese language, but ...
Nogeoldae - Wikipedia
Konglish
Konglish (Korean: 콩글리시/콩글리쉬 or more formally Hangul: 한국어식 영어; hanja: 韓國語式英語 "Korean language style English") is the use of English words or words derived from English words in a Korean...
Hangul Day
The Korean Alphabet Day, known as Hangeul Day in South Korea, and Chosŏn'gŭl Day in North Korea, is a national Korean commemorative day marking the invention and the proclamation of the Korean alphabe...
Korean count word
Like Chinese and Japanese, Korean uses special measure or counting words to count objects and events, which in Korean are called subullyusa (Hangeul:수분류사 / Hanja: 數分類詞).In English, one must say, "two ...
The National Institute of the Korean Language
The National Institute of the Korean Language is a language regulator of the Korean language. It was created on January 23, 1991, by Presidential Decree No. 13163 (November 14, 1990). It is based in S...
Han unification
Han unification is an effort by the authors of Unicode and the Universal Character Set to map multiple character sets of the so-called CJK languages into a single set of unified characters. Han charac...
Gaya language
Gaya, also rendered Kaya or Kara, is the presumed language of the Gaya confederacy in southern Korea. It is supposedly attested from thirteen toponyms, but it cannot be certain that these reflect the ...
Korean manual alphabet
The Korean manual alphabet is used by the Deaf in South Korea who speak Korean Sign Language. It is a one-handed alphabet that mimics the shapes of the letters in hangul, and is used when signing Kore...
Korean manual alphabet - Wikipedia
Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese (古文, gǔwén, "ancient text") is the language of the classic literature from the end of the Spring and Autumn period through to the end of the Han Dynasty, a written form of Old Chines...
Classical Chinese - Wikipedia
Korean verbs
Verbs in the Korean language come in last place in a clause. Verbs are the most complex part of speech, and a properly conjugated verb may stand on its own as a complete sentence. This article uses th...
Gugyeol
Gugyeol is a system for rendering texts written in Classical Chinese into understandable Korean. It was chiefly used during the Joseon Dynasty, when readings of the Chinese classics were of paramount...
Gugyeol - Wikipedia
Buyeo language
The language of the Buyeo kingdom is very sparsely attested; however, according to Chinese sources it was mutually intelligible with the Goguryeo language to its south. The few words which are known b...
Buyeo language - Wikipedia
Sino-Korean vocabulary
Sino-Korean or Hanja-eo (Korean: 한자어, Hanja: 漢字語) refers to the set of words in the Korean language vocabulary that originated from or were influenced by hanja. The Sino-Korean lexicon consists of bot...
Dravido-Korean languages
Koreanic-Dravidian or Dravido-Koreanic is an obsolete language family proposal which links the living or proto-Dravidian language to the Korean language. The hypothesis was originally proposed by Morg...
Japanese dialects
The dialects of the Japanese language fall into two primary clades, Eastern (including Tokyo) and Western (including Kyoto), with the dialects of Kyushu and Hachijō Island often distinguished as addit...
Japanese dialects - Wikipedia
Korean numerals
The Korean language has two regularly used sets of numerals, a native Korean system and Sino-Korean system.
For both native and Sino- Korean numerals, the teens (11 through 19) are represented by ...
Topic marker
A topic marker is a grammatical particle used to mark the topic of a sentence. It is found in Japanese, Korean, Ryukyuan and, to a limited extent, Classic Chinese languages. It often overlaps with the...
Hyangchal
Hyangchal (literally vernacular letters or local letters) is an archaic writing system of Korea and was used to transcribe the Korean language in hanja. Under the hyangchal system, Chinese characters...