Carolingian Empire
The Carolingian Empire (800–888 AD) was the final stage in the history of the early medieval realm of the Franks, ruled by the Carolingian dynasty.The size of the empire at its zenith around 800...
Carolingian Empire - Wikipedia
Charlemagne: One Of The Most Important Figures Of Early Medieval Europe
Charlemagne (known also as Charles the Great, as well as Charles I) was a King of the Franks, the first ruler of the Holy Roman Empire (though the term ‘Holy Roman Empire’ would only be
Carolingian Empire
Charlemagne - The Rise of the Franks Music : Basil Poledouris Anvil of Crom and Atlantean Sword
Carolingian art - Carolingian Art History
The history of Carolingian Art by http://historyofpainters.com Carolingian art centered around Manuscript Illumination, which thrived in Charlemagne's empire...
Battle of Tours - Video
October 10, 732 AD marks the conclusion of the Battle of Tours, arguably one of the most decisive battles in all of history. A Moslem army, in a crusading se...
Carolingian art
The history of Carolingian Art by http://historyofpainters.com Carolingian art centered around Manuscript Illumination, which thrived in Charlemagne's empire...
Charlemagne
outta the dark ages.
Charles Martel
Charles Martel (c. 688 – 22 October 741) was a Frankish statesman and military leader who, as Duke and Prince of the Franks and Mayor of the Palace, was de facto ruler of Francia from 718 until his d...
Charles Martel - Wikipedia
Charlemagne
Charlemagne (/ˈʃɑrlɨmeɪn/; 2 April 742/747/748 – 28 January 814), also known as Charles the Great (Latin: Carolus or Karolus Magnus, French: Charles Le Grand or Charlemagne, Ger...
Charlemagne - Wikipedia
Mayor of the Palace
Under the Merovingian dynasty, the mayor of the palace (Latin: maior palatii) or majordomo (maior domus) was the manager of the household of the Frankish king. The office existed from the sixth ce...
Battle of Tours
The Battle of Tours (October 732), also called the Battle of Poitiers and in Arabic: معركة بلاط الشهداء‎ (ma'arakat Balâṭ ash-Shuhadâ – Battle of the Palace of Martyrs) was fought in an area...
Battle of Tours - Wikipedia
Abbasid-Carolingian alliance
An Abbasid–Carolingian alliance was attempted and partially formed during the 8th to 9th century through a series of embassies, rapprochements and combined military operations between the Frankish Car...
Abbasid-Carolingian alliance - Wikipedia
Battle of Fontenoy (841)
The three year Carolingian Civil War culminated in the decisive Battle of Fontenoy-en-Puisaye, also called the Battle of Fontenoy, fought at Fontenoy, near Auxerre, on the 25 June 841. The war was the...
Battle of Fontenoy (841) - Wikipedia
Oaths of Strasbourg
The Oaths of Strasbourg, were mutual pledges of allegiance between Louis the German (876), ruler of East Francia, and his half-brother Charles the Bald (†877), ruler of West Francia made on 12 Februar...
Oaths of Strasbourg - Wikipedia
Treaty of Verdun
The Treaty of Verdun, signed in August 843, was the first of the treaties that divided the Carolingian Empire into three kingdoms among the three surviving sons of Louis the Pious, the son and success...
Treaty of Meerssen
The Treaty of Meerssen or Mersen, concluded on 8 August 870, was a treaty of partition of the realm of Lothair II by his uncles Louis the German of East Francia and Charles the Bald of West Francia, t...
Treaty of Meerssen - Wikipedia
Carolingian Renaissance
The Carolingian Renaissance, the first of three medieval renaissances, was a period of cultural activity in the Carolingian Empire occurring from the late eighth century to the ninth century, taking i...
Carolingian Renaissance - Wikipedia
Carolingian art
Carolingian art comes from the Frankish Empire in the period of roughly 120 years from about 780 to 900 — during the reign of Charlemagne and his immediate heirs — popularly known as the C...
Carolingian art - Wikipedia
Carolingian architecture
Carolingian architecture is the style of north European Pre-Romanesque architecture belonging to the period of the Carolingian Renaissance of the late 8th and 9th centuries, when the Carolingian fami...
Carolingian architecture - Wikipedia
Codex Aureus of St. Emmeram
The Codex Aureus of St. Emmeram (Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 14000) is a 9th-century illuminated Gospel Book. It is named after Emmeram of Regensburg and lavishly illuminated. The cover ...
Codex Aureus of St. Emmeram - Wikipedia
Utrecht Psalter
The Utrecht Psalter (Utrecht, Universiteitsbibliotheek, MS Bibl. Rhenotraiectinae I Nr 32.) is a ninth-century illuminated psalter which is a key masterpiece of Carolingian art; it is probably the mos...
Utrecht Psalter - Wikipedia
Carolingian minuscule
Carolingian or Caroline minuscule is a script developed as a calligraphic standard in Europe so that the Latin alphabet could be easily recognized by the literate class from one region to another. It ...
Carolingian minuscule - Wikipedia
Carolingian Schools
Carolingian Schools comprised a small number of educational institutions which had a major share in the Carolingian renaissance, specifically cathedral schools and monastic schools.
Under the Mero...
Carolingian Schools - Wikipedia
Government of the Carolingian Empire
The government, administration, and organisation of the Carolingian Empire were forged in the court of Charlemagne in the decades around the year 800. In this year, Charlemagne was crowned emperor and...
Government of the Carolingian Empire - Wikipedia
Charlemagne: One Of The Most Important Figures Of Early Medieval Europe
Charlemagne (known also as Charles the Great, as well as Charles I) was a King of the Franks, the first ruler of the Holy Roman Empire (though the term ‘Holy Roman Empire’ would only be
Louis II the Stammerer
Louis the Stammerer (French: Louis le Bègue) (1 November 846 – 10 April 879) was the King of Aquitaine and later King of West Francia. He was the eldest son of Charles the Bald and Ermentrude of O...
Louis II the Stammerer - Wikipedia
Palace of Aachen
6°05′02″E / 50.77556°N 6.08389°E / 50.77556; 6.08389The Palace of Aachen was a group of buildings with residential, political and religious purposes chosen by Charlemagne to b...
Palace of Aachen - Wikipedia
Lothair of France
Lothair (French: Lothaire; Latin: Lothārius; 941 – 2 March 986), sometimes called Lothair III or Lothair IV, was the Carolingian king of West Francia from 10 September 954.
Lothair, born n...
Lothair of France - Wikipedia
Louis IV of France
Louis IV (10 September 920 – 30 September 954), called d'Outremer or Transmarinus (both meaning "from overseas"), reigned as King of Western Francia from 936 to 954. He was a member of the Carolingian...
Louis IV of France - Wikipedia
Pepin the Short
Pippin the Younger (c. 714 - September 24, 768), often known under the mistranslation Pippin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks from 751 until his d...
Pepin the Short - Wikipedia