Charlemagne
Charlemagne (/ˈʃɑrlɨmeɪn/; 2 April 742/747/748 – 28 January 814), also known as Charles the Great (Latin: Carolus or Karolus Magnus, French: Charles Le Grand or Charlemagne, Ger...
Charlemagne - Wikipedia
Charlemagne: One Of The Most Important Figures Of Early Medieval Europe
Charlemagne (known also as Charles the Great, as well as Charles I) was a King of the Franks, the first ruler of the Holy Roman Empire (though the term ‘Holy Roman Empire’ would only be
Joyeuse - 3D
Joyeuse, sword of Charles the Great, sculpted and animated with Blender 2.62. Soundtrack: The Sims Medieval - main theme.
Carolingian art - Carolingian Art History
The history of Carolingian Art by http://historyofpainters.com Carolingian art centered around Manuscript Illumination, which thrived in Charlemagne's empire...
Carolingian art
The history of Carolingian Art by http://historyofpainters.com Carolingian art centered around Manuscript Illumination, which thrived in Charlemagne's empire...
Charlemagne
outta the dark ages.
Theodiscus
Theodiscus, the Latinised form of a Germanic word meaning "vernacular" or "of the people", is a Medieval Latin adjective referring to the Germanic vernaculars of the Early Middle Ages. The Old High Ge...
Mayor of the Palace
Under the Merovingian dynasty, the mayor of the palace (Latin: maior palatii) or majordomo (maior domus) was the manager of the household of the Frankish king. The office existed from the sixth ce...
Aquitaine
Aquitaine (/ˈækwɨteɪn/; [akitɛn]; Occitan: Aquitània; Basque: Akitania; Spanish: Aquitania), archaic Guyenne/Guienne (Occitan: Guiana), is one of the 27 Regions of France, in the south-wes...
Aquitaine - Wikipedia
Umayyad conquest of Hispania
The Umayyad conquest of Hispania is the initial expansion of the Umayyad Caliphate over Hispania largely extending from 711 to 788. The conquest resulted in the destruction of the Visigothic Kingdom a...
Umayyad conquest of Hispania - Wikipedia
Abbasid-Carolingian alliance
An Abbasid–Carolingian alliance was attempted and partially formed during the 8th to 9th century through a series of embassies, rapprochements and combined military operations between the Frankish Car...
Abbasid-Carolingian alliance - Wikipedia
Charlemagne and church music
The Frankish emperor Charlemagne took an intense interest in church music, and its propagation and adequate performance throughout his empire. He not only caused liturgical music to flourish in his ow...
Government of the Carolingian Empire
The government, administration, and organisation of the Carolingian Empire were forged in the court of Charlemagne in the decades around the year 800. In this year, Charlemagne was crowned emperor and...
Government of the Carolingian Empire - Wikipedia
Carolingian art
Carolingian art comes from the Frankish Empire in the period of roughly 120 years from about 780 to 900 — during the reign of Charlemagne and his immediate heirs — popularly known as the C...
Carolingian art - Wikipedia
Council of Frankfurt
The Council of Frankfurt in 794 was called by Charlemagne, as a meeting of the important churchmen of the Frankish realm. Bishops and priests from Francia, Aquitaine, Italy, and Provence gathered in F...
Council of Frankfurt - Wikipedia
Codex Vaticanus Latinus 3868
The Vatican Terence (Terentius Vaticanus), or Codex Vaticanus Latinus 3868, is a 9th-century illuminated manuscript of the Latin comedies of Publius Terentius Afer, housed in the Vatican Library. Acco...
Codex Vaticanus Latinus 3868 - Wikipedia
Aachen Rathaus
The Gothic Aachen Rathaus, or "Aachen City Hall", lies next to the Aachen Cathedral and is one of the most striking structures in the Altstadt of Aachen, Germany.
In the first half of the 14th cen...
Aachen Rathaus - Wikipedia
Joyeuse
Joyeuse ([ʒwaˈjøz]), is the name tradition attributes to Charlemagne's personal sword. The name translates as "joyous".
Some legends claim Joyeuse was forged to contain the Lance of Longinus wit...
Joyeuse - Wikipedia
Pax Nicephori
Pax Nicephori, the "Peace of Nicephorus", is a term used to refer to both a peace treaty of 803, tentatively concluded between the Frankish ruler Charlemagne and Nikephoros I, emperor of Byzantium, an...
Lindau Gospels
The Lindau Gospels is an illuminated manuscript in the Morgan Library in New York, which is important for its illuminated text, but still more so for its treasure binding, or metalwork covers, which a...
Lindau Gospels - Wikipedia
Tencendur
Tencendur, or Tencendor, ("strife") is the warhorse of King Charlemagne in the French epic, The Song of Roland. Tencendur is mentioned in laisse 262 of the poem.
Descent from Charlemagne
Charlemagne (/ˈʃɑrlɨmeɪn/; 2 April 742/747/748 – 28 January 814), also known as Charles the Great (Latin: Carolus or Karolus Magnus, French: Charles Le Grand or Charlemagne, Ger...
Descent from Charlemagne - Wikipedia
Himiltrude
Himiltrude (c. 742-c.780?) was the mother of Charlemagne's first-born son Pippin the Hunchback.
Little is known about Himiltrude's origins. Paulus Diaconus calls her a "noble girl". The appearance...
Saint Peter's church, Vienne (Isère)
Saint Peter's church (Saint-Pierre-le-Bas) in Vienne is one of the oldest surviving churches in France, situated in the Rhône-Alpes region. The church was added to the 1862 version of the list of Fran...
Saint Peter's church, Vienne (Isère) - Wikipedia
Bouchard I of Montmorency
Bouchard Ist, Lord of Montmorency, was the Chief General of the naval forces that Charlemagne sent against Italy.
Bouchard was also the chief of the army, which then corresponded to the position o...
Einhard
Einhard (also Eginhard or Einhart; c. 770 – March 14, 840) was a Frankish scholar and courtier. Einhard was a dedicated servant of Charlemagne and his son Louis the Pious; his main work is a bio...
Einhard - Wikipedia