Uncovering The Secrets Of Ice That Burns
Methane hydrates can be seen as a potential energy source or as a dangerous source of methane - a greenhouse gas that is 20 times more potent than CO2. With the help of a supercomputer and an interdis...
Fuel
Fuels are any materials that store potential energy in forms that can be practicably released and used for work or as heat energy. The concept originally applied solely to those materials storing ener...
Fuel - Wikipedia
Colloidal fuel
Colloidal fuel is an emulsion of powdered coal in kerosene. It was used in World War I aboard ships as kerosene supplies ran low.
World LP Gas Association
The World LPG Association (WLPGA) is the authoritative global voice for the LPG industry. The WLPGA is a worldwide industry association which represents the interests of the liquefied petroleum gas (...
Renewable fuels
Renewable fuels are fuels produced from renewable resources. Examples include: biofuels (e.g. Vegetable oil used as fuel, ethanol, methanol from clean energy and carbon dioxide or biomass, and biodie...
Renewable fuels - Wikipedia
Oxy-fuel
Oxy-fuel refers to technology that burns pure oxygen with gaseous fuel. As compared to air, which contains 20.95% oxygen, higher temperatures can be reached using pure oxygen. Approximately the same t...
Water splitting
Water splitting is the general term for a chemical reaction in which water is separated into oxygen and hydrogen. Efficient and economical water splitting would be a key technology component of a hydr...
Water splitting - Wikipedia
Coalite
Coalite is a brand of low-temperature coke used as a smokeless fuel. The title refers to the residue left behind when coal is carbonised at 640 degrees Celsius. It was invented by Thomas Parker in 19...
Coalite - Wikipedia
Nitromethane
Nitromethane is an organic compound with the chemical formula CH3NO2. It is the simplest organic nitro compound. It is a slightly viscous, highly polar liquid commonly used as a solvent in a variety ...
Nitromethane - Wikipedia
Charcoal lighter fluid
Charcoal lighter fluid is a volatile fluid used to accelerate the ignition of charcoal in a barbecue grill. It can either be petroleum or alcohol (usually methanol or ethanol) based. It can be used bo...
Motor fuel
A motor fuel is a fuel that is used to provide power to motor vehicles.Currently, the majority of motor vehicles worldwide are powered by gasoline or diesel. Other energy sources include ethanol, biod...
White gas
White gas is a common name for two flammable substances. White gas should not be confused with white spirit, which is more akin to kerosene.
White gas - Wikipedia
Timeline of alcohol fuel
Ethanol, an alcohol fuel, is an important fuel for the operation of internal combustion engines that are used in cars, trucks, and other kinds of machinery.
Coal
Coal (from the Old English term col, which has meant "mineral of fossilized carbon" since the 13th century) is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata i...
Coal - Wikipedia
Filling station
A filling station is a facility which sells fuel and usually lubricants for motor vehicles. The most common fuels sold today are gasoline (gasoline or gas in the U.S. and Canada, typically petrol else...
Filling station - Wikipedia
Liquid nitrogen vehicle
A liquid nitrogen vehicle is powered by liquid nitrogen, which is stored in a tank. Traditional nitrogen engine designs work by heating the liquid nitrogen in a heat exchanger, extracting heat from th...
White coal
White coal is a form of fuel produced by drying chopped wood over a fire. It differs from charcoal which is carbonised wood. White coal was used in England to smelt lead ore from the mid-sixteenth to ...
Liquid fuel
Liquid fuels are combustible or energy-generating molecules that can be harnessed to create mechanical energy, usually producing kinetic energy; they also must take the shape of their container. It is...
Firewood
Firewood is any wooden material that is gathered and used for fuel. Generally, firewood is not highly processed and is in some sort of recognizable log or branch form, compared to other forms of wood...
Firewood - Wikipedia
Kerosene
Kerosene is a combustible hydrocarbon liquid widely used as a fuel, in industry, and in households. Its name is derived from Greek: κηρός (keros) meaning wax, and was registered as a trademark by ...
Kerosene - Wikipedia
Oxygenate
Oxygenated chemical compounds contain oxygen as a part of their chemical structure. The term usually refers to oxygenated fuels. Oxygenates are usually employed as gasoline additives to reduce carbon ...
Biohydrogen
Biohydrogen is defined as hydrogen produced biologically, most commonly by algae, bacteria and archaea. Biohydrogen is a potential biofuel obtainable from both cultivation and from waste organic mater...
Biohydrogen - Wikipedia
Cow dung
Cow dung, also known as cow pats, cow pies or cow manure, is the waste product of bovine animal species. These species include domestic cattle ("cows"), bison ("buffalo"), yak, and water buffalo. Cow ...
Cow dung - Wikipedia
Charcoal
Mangrove charcoal burning videoCharcoal is a light, black residue, consisting of carbon and any remaining ash, obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation s...
Charcoal - Wikipedia
Methane
Methane (/ˈmɛθeɪn/ or /ˈmiːθeɪn/) is a chemical compound with the chemical formula CH4 (one atom of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen). It is the simplest alkane and the main component of natural gas....
Methane - Wikipedia
Underground storage tank
An Underground Storage Tank (UST), in United States environmental law, is a tank and any underground piping connected to the tank that has at least 90 percent of its combined volume underground.
U...
Underground storage tank - Wikipedia
Coke (fuel)
Coke is a fuel with few impurities and a high carbon content, usually made from coal. It is the solid carbonaceous material derived from destructive distillation of low-ash, low-sulfur bituminous coal...
Coke (fuel) - Wikipedia
Binchōtan
Binchō-tan or white charcoal or binchō-zumi (備長炭) is a traditional charcoal of Japan. It dates to the Edo period, when during the Genroku era, a craftsman named Bitchū-ya Chōzaemon (備中屋 長左衛門) began to...
Binchōtan - Wikipedia
Jobber (fuel)
A jobber, or petroleum marketer, is a person or company that purchases quantities of refined fuel from refining companies (e.g. BP, Shell, Exxon), either for sale to retailers (e.g., gasoline stations...