Constantinian dynasty
The Constantinian dynasty is an informal name for the ruling family of the Roman Empire from Constantius Chlorus (†305) to the death of Julian in 363. It is named after its most famous member, Constan...
Cappadocian Fathers
The Cappadocian Fathers are Basil the Great (330-379), who was bishop of Caesarea; Basil's younger brother Gregory of Nyssa (c.332-395), who was bishop of Nyssa; and a close friend, Gregory of Nazian...
Cappadocian Fathers - Wikipedia
Constans
Constans (Latin: Flavius Julius Constans Augustus; c. 323 – 350) was Roman Emperor from 337 to 350. He defeated his brother Constantine II in 340, but anger in the army over his personal life and ...
Constans - Wikipedia
Religious persecution in the Roman Empire
As the Roman Republic, and later the Roman Empire, expanded, it came to include people from a variety of cultures, and religions. The worship of an ever increasing number of deities was tolerated and ...
Religious persecution in the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
Philip the Arab
Marcus Julius Philippus (Latin: Marcus Julius Philippus Augustus; c. 204 – 249) also known commonly by his nickname Philip the Arab (Latin: Philippus Arabs, Arabic: فيليب العربي‎), a...
Philip the Arab - Wikipedia
Persecution of Christians in the New Testament
The persecution of Christians in the New Testament is an important part of the Early Christian narrative which depicts the early Church as being persecuted for their heterodox beliefs by a Jewish esta...
Persecution in Lyon
The persecution in Lyon in AD 177 was a persecution of Christians in Lugdunum, Roman Gaul (present-day Lyon, France), during the reign of Marcus Aurelius (161-180). The sole account of this persecuti...
Persecution in Lyon - Wikipedia
Diocletianic Persecution
The Diocletianic or Great Persecution was the last and most severe persecution of Christians in the Roman empire. In 303, the Emperors Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius, and Constantius issued a series o...
Diocletianic Persecution - Wikipedia
Edict of toleration
An edict of toleration is a declaration, made by a government or ruler and states, that members of a given religion will not be persecuted for engaging in their religious practices and traditions. The...
Edict of toleration - Wikipedia
Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire
The anti-Christian policies or persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire occurred intermittently over a period of about three centuries until the 313 Edict of Milan issued by Emperors Constantine ...
Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
Second Council of Nicaea
The Second Council of Nicaea is recognized as the seventh of the first seven ecumenical councils by both West and East. Orthodox, Catholics, and Old Catholics unanimously recognize it; Protestant opi...
Second Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia
State church of the Roman Empire
Nicene Christianity became the state church of the Roman Empire with the Edict of Thessalonica in AD 380, when Emperor Theodosius I made it the Empire's sole authorized religion. The Eastern Orthodox ...
State church of the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
Proto-orthodox Christianity
Proto-orthodox Christianity is a term, coined by New Testament scholar Bart D. Ehrman, used to describe the Early Christian movement which was the precursor of Christian orthodoxy. Ehrman argues that ...
Proto-orthodox Christianity - Wikipedia
Vettius Agorius Praetextatus
Vettius Agorius Praetextatus (ca. 315–384) was a wealthy pagan aristocrat in 4th-century Roman Empire and a high priest in the cults of numerous gods. He served as the praetorian prefect at the court ...
Vettius Agorius Praetextatus - Wikipedia
Maximus the Confessor
Maximus the Confessor (Greek: Μάξιμος ὁ Ὁμολογητής) also known as Maximus the Theologian and Maximus of Constantinople (c. 580 – 13 August 662) was a Christian monk, theologian, and scholar.In his...
Maximus the Confessor - Wikipedia
Early centers of Christianity
Early Christianity (generally considered the time period from its start to 325), spread from the Eastern Mediterranean throughout the Roman Empire and beyond, reaching as far east as India. Originally...
Early centers of Christianity - Wikipedia
Quintus Aurelius Symmachus
Quintus Aurelius Symmachus (c. 345 – 402) was a Roman statesman, orator, and man of letters. He held the offices of governor of proconsular Africa in 373, urban prefect of Rome in 384 and 385, and con...
Quintus Aurelius Symmachus - Wikipedia
Fifty Bibles of Constantine
The Fifty Bibles of Constantine were Bibles in Greek language commissioned in 331 by Constantine I and prepared by Eusebius of Caesarea. They were made for the use of the Bishop of Constantinople in t...
Fifty Bibles of Constantine - Wikipedia
Alexandrian Rite
The Alexandrian Rite is the liturgical rite currently used by the Coptic Orthodox, Eritrean Orthodox, Ethiopian Orthodox as well as by those churches' corresponding Eastern Catholic Churches.The divin...
Saint Thomas Christians
The Saint Thomas Christians, also called Syrian Christians or Nasrani, are an ancient community of Christians from Kerala, India, who trace their origins to the evangelistic activity of Saint Thomas i...
Saint Thomas Christians - Wikipedia
History of Anatolia
The history of Anatolia (Asia Minor) can be roughly subdivded into prehistory, Ancient Near East (Bronze Age and Early Iron Age), Classical Anatolia, Hellenistic Anatolia, Byzantine Anatolia, the ag...
History of Anatolia - Wikipedia
Christian monasticism
Christian monasticism is the devotional practice of individuals who live ascetic and typically cloistered lives that are dedicated to Christian worship. It began to develop early in the history of the...
Christian monasticism - Wikipedia
Great Fire of Rome
The Great Fire of Rome was an urban fire that started on the night between 18 and 19 July in the year 64 AD . It caused widespread devastation before being brought under control after six days. Differ...
Great Fire of Rome - Wikipedia
First seven Ecumenical Councils
In the history of Christianity, the first seven ecumenical councils, from the First Council of Nicaea (325) to the Second Council of Nicaea (787), represented an attempt to reach an orthodox consensus...
First seven Ecumenical Councils - Wikipedia
Constantinian shift
Constantinian shift is a term used by Nontrinitarian Christians, as well as Anabaptist and Post-Christendom theologians, to describe the political and theological aspects of the 4th-century process of...
Constantinian shift - Wikipedia
Galerius
Galerius (Latin: Gaius Galerius Valerius Maximianus Augustus; c. 260 – April or May 311), was Roman Emperor from 305 to 311. During his reign he campaigned, aided by Diocletian, against the Sassa...
Galerius - Wikipedia
Third Council of Constantinople
The Third Council of Constantinople, counted as the Sixth Ecumenical Council by the Orthodox Church, the Catholic Church and other Christian groups, met in 680/681 and condemned monoenergism and monot...