Inuit mythology
Inuit mythology has many similarities to the religions of other peoples of the North Polar region. Inuit traditional religious practices may be very briefly summarised as a form of shamanism based on...
Sami shamanism
Sami shamanism is shamanism as practiced by the Sami people. Though they vary considerably from region to region within Sápmi, traditional Sámi beliefs consist of three intertwining elements: animi...
Sami shamanism - Wikipedia
Ku'urkil
The Chukchi creator-deity, roughly analogous to Bai-Ulgan of the Turkic pantheon. The Koryak refer to him as Quikinna'qu ("Big Raven") and in Kamchadal mythology he is called Kutkhu.
Ku'urkil - Wikipedia
Gonagas
The title gonagas (or konagas), bird man, was a shaman ranking level in Northern Scandinavia amongst noayddes, which possessed special level of spiritual knowledge and visualized themselves to have po...
Caribou mother
The Caribou Mother is an Inuit deity who represents the source of caribou, formerly a vital food source for the Inuit people. She is seen as gigantic, with people and caribou as lice on her enormous b...
Ataksak
Ataksak is a goddess in Inuit mythology. She is the ruler of the sky, and represents the light in the world that brings joy and happiness to the people.
Radien-attje
Radien-attje, Jubmel, Vearalden Olmai or Waralden Olmai is the superior or celestial deity of the Sami, also called Jubmel or Ibmel, a parallel to the Finnish Jumala (God).The superior deity is the ru...
Inua
In Inuit mythology, an inua (plural inuat, literally "possessor") is a spirit or soul that exists in all people, animals, lakes, mountains, and plants. They were sometimes personified in mythology. ...
Sedna (mythology)
Sedna (Inuktitut: ᓴᓐᓇ, Sanna) is the goddess of the sea and marine animals in Inuit mythology, also known as the Mother of the Sea or Mistress of the Sea. The story of Sedna, which is a creation m...
Sedna (mythology) - Wikipedia
Tornrak
Tornrak is the third opera by Welsh composer John Metcalf. It has an English-language libretto by Michael Wilcox with Inuktitut sections translated by Blendina Makkik. Set between the worlds of the Ca...
Fragments of Lappish Mythology
Fragments of Lappish Mythology is the detailed documented account of the Sami religious beliefs and mythology during the mid-19th century. It was written between 1838–1845 by Swedish minister Lars Le...
Fragments of Lappish Mythology - Wikipedia
Ahkiyyini
Ahkiyyini is a dancing skeleton in Inuit folklore. He was responsible for causing shipwrecks in the ocean; his dancing made the waves vibrate, influencing the way the boats move. Ahkiyyini played inst...
Arnakuagsak
In Inuit mythology, Arnakuagsak ("old woman from the sea") was an Inuit goddess, one of the primary deities of the religion, who was responsible for ensuring the hunters were able to catch enough food...
Aumanil
In Inuit mythology, Aumanil (pronounced au-MAHN-EL) is a kind and beneficent spirit. Also, it is said that this god lived on land and controlled the movement of the whales.
Adlivun
In Inuit mythology, Adlivun (those beneath us; also known as Idliragijenget) refers to both the spirits of the departed who reside in the underworld, and that underworld itself, located beneath the la...
Atshen
In Inuit mythology, Atshen is a cannibalistic spirit.
Nerrivik
In Inuit mythology, Nerrivik was the sea-mother and provider of food for the Inuit people. She was the patron of fisherman and hunters. In Canada, she was known as either Sedna or Arnapkapfaaluk and...
Itijjuaq
Itijjuaq is, in the religion of the Inuit, a third gender being that was one of the world's first shamans. He discovered the world's first amulet, a sea urchin shell, which allowed him to cure the mo...
Nuliajuk
Nuliajuk is a goddess of the Netsilik Inuit. According to Rasmussen Nuliajuk lives on the bottom of the sea and controls sea mammals (seals, walruses, and sea lions). Whenever humans neglect to obser...
Tupilaq
In Greenlandic Inuit (Kalaallit) traditions, a tupilaq (tupilak, tupilait, or ᑐᐱᓚᒃ) was an avenging monster fabricated by a practitioner of witchcraft or shamanism by using var...
Tupilaq - Wikipedia
Tulugaak
In Inuit mythology, Tulugaak was the creator of light. The meaning of /tulugaq/ is 'raven'; cf. the god Tuluŋigraq ("something like a raven").
Anguta
Anguta is the father of the sea goddess Sedna in Inuit mythology. In certain myths of the Greenland Inuit Anguta (also called "His Father" or Anigut) is considered the creator-god and is the supreme ...
Qalupalik
Qalupalik is an Inuit mythological creature. It is a human-like creature that lives in the sea, with long hair, green skin, and long fingernails. The myth is that qalupaliks wear an amautiit (a form o...
Apanuugak
In Inuit mythology, Apanuugak is a culture hero who was sometimes depicted as an error-prone warrior who lives to old age and sometimes as a dastardly villain.
Kiviuq
Kiviuq (also spelled "Qiviuq," "Kiviok" and other variants) is a legendary hero of the epic stories of the Inuit of the Arctic regions of northern Canada, Alaska and Greenland.Kiviuq is an eternal Inu...
Tjaetsieålmaj
Tjaetsieålmaj or Thjathjeolmai (the man of the water) controlled lakes and rivers, and gave fishing fortune to people in Sami mythology. The word Thjathje means water, and is said to be the origin of ...
Draugr
The draugr or draug (Old Norse: draugr, plural draugar; modern Icelandic: draugur, Faroese: dreygur and Norwegian, Swedish and Danish draugen), also called aptrganga or aptrgangr, literal...
Draugr - Wikipedia