Classical Japan
The history of Japan includes the history of the islands of Japan and the Japanese people, spanning the ancient history of the region to the modern history of Japan as a nation state. Following the la...
Classical Japan - Wikipedia
Asuka period
The Asuka period (飛鳥時代, Asuka jidai) was a period in the history of Japan lasting from 538 to 710 (or 592-645), although its beginning could be said to overlap with the preceding Kofun period....
Asuka period - Wikipedia
Nara period
The Nara period (奈良時代, Nara jidai) of the history of Japan covers the years from AD 710 to 794. Empress Gemmei established the capital of Heijō-kyō (present-day Nara). Except for a five-year p...
Nara period - Wikipedia
Heian period
The Heian period (平安時代, Heian jidai) is the last division of classical Japanese history, running from 794 to 1159. The period is named after the capital city of Heian-kyō, or modern Kyōto. It ...
Heian period - Wikipedia
Kofun
Kofun (古墳, from Sino-Japanese "ancient grave") are megalithic tombs or tumuli in Japan, constructed between the early 3rd century and the early 7th century AD. They gave their name to the Kofun period...
Kofun - Wikipedia
Emperor Sanjō
Emperor Sanjō (三条天皇, Sanjō-tennō, February 6, 975 – June 5, 1017) was the 67th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.Sanjō's reign spanned the years from 1011 thro...
Emperor Sanjō - Wikipedia
Semimaru
Semimaru also known as Semimaro (蝉丸) was a Japanese poet and musician of the early Heian period. His name is recorded in the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu, but there are no historical accounts of his pedig...
Semimaru - Wikipedia
Akazome Emon
Akazome Emon (赤染衛門, 956–1041) was a Japanese waka poet and early historian who lived in the mid-Heian period. She is a member both of the Thirty Six Elder Poetic Sages (中古三十六歌仙, Chūko Sanj...
Akazome Emon - Wikipedia
Uda Genji
The Uda Genji (宇多源氏) were the successful and powerful line of a Japanese Minamoto clan that were descended from Emperor Uda (宇多天皇). Many of the famous Minamoto warriors, including Sasaki clan (佐々木...
Uda Genji - Wikipedia
Japanese missions to Imperial China
The Japanese Missions to Imperial China were diplomatic embassies which were intermittently sent to the Chinese court. Any distinction amongst diplomatic envoys sent from the Imperial Japanese court o...
Japanese missions to Imperial China - Wikipedia
Yōrō Code
The Yōrō Code (養老律令, Yōrō-ritsuryō) was one iteration of several codes or governing rules compiled in early Nara period in Classical Japan. It was compiled in 718, the second year of the Yōrō...
Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō (律令) is the historical law system based on the philosophies of Confucianism and Chinese Legalism in Japan. The political system in accord to Ritsuryō is called "Ritsuryō-sei" (律令制). Kyaku...
Sanjūsangen-dō
Sanjūsangen-dō (三十三間堂, lit. thirty-three ken (length) hall) is a Buddhist temple in Higashiyama District of Kyoto, Japan. Officially known as "Rengeō-in" (蓮華王院), or Hall of the Lotus King, Sanjūsa...
Sanjūsangen-dō - Wikipedia
Izumi Shikibu
Izumi Shikibu (和泉式部, b. 976?) was a mid Heian period Japanese poet. She is a member of the Thirty-six Medieval Poetry Immortals (中古三十六歌仙, chūko sanjurokkasen). She was the contemporary of ...
Izumi Shikibu - Wikipedia
Minamoto clan
Minamoto clan (源, Minamoto-shi) was one of the surnames bestowed by the Emperors of Japan upon members of the imperial family who were demoted into the ranks of the nobility. The practice was ...
Minamoto clan - Wikipedia
Emperor Go-Shirakawa
Emperor Go-Shirakawa (後白河天皇 Go-Shirakawa-tennō) (October 18, 1127 – April 26, 1192) was the 77th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 11...
Emperor Go-Shirakawa - Wikipedia
Sarumaru Dayū
Sarumaru no Taifu, also known as Sarumaru no Dayū (猿丸大夫, sarumaru no taifu/dayū) was a waka poet in the early Heian period. He is a member of the Thirty Six Poetic Sages (三十六歌仙, sanjūr...
Sarumaru Dayū - Wikipedia
Toi invasion
The Toi invasion (Japanese: 刀伊の入寇 toi no nyūkō) was the invasion of northern Kyūshū by Jurchen pirates in 1019. At the time, Toi (되, Doe) meant "barbarian" in the Korean language.The Toi pirates saile...
Hakuhō period
The Hakuhō period (白鳳時代, Hakuhō jidai, lit. "white phoenix period") was an unofficial Japanese era name (年号,, nengō,, lit. "year name") of Emperor Temmu after Hakuchi and before Suchō....
Hakuhō period - Wikipedia
Abe no Nakamaro
Abe no Nakamaro (阿倍 仲麻呂, c. 698 – c. 770), also known as Chao Heng (晁衡, Chōkō in Japanese), was a Japanese scholar, administrator, and waka poet in the Nara period.
He was a descendant of Prin...
Abe no Nakamaro - Wikipedia
Provincial temple
Kokubun-ji (国分寺) were Buddhist temples established in each of the provinces of Japan by the Emperor Shōmu during the Nara period (710 – 794). Shōmu (701 – 756?) decreed both a kokubunj...
Provincial temple - Wikipedia
Ōmi Code
The Ōmi code (近江令, ōmiryō) are a collection of governing rules compiled in 668AD, hence being the first collection of Ritsuryō laws in classical Japan. These laws were compiled by Fujiwara no ...
Ōmi Code - Wikipedia
Taira no Kiyomori
Taira no Kiyomori (平 清盛, 1118 – March 20, 1181) was a military leader of the late Heian period of Japan. He established the first samurai-dominated administrative government in the history of Ja...
Taira no Kiyomori - Wikipedia
Kōgoishi
Kōgoishi (神篭石 or 神籠石) are earthenwork structures, on a stone foundation, constructed in Japan during the Asuka period, particularly in areas around Fukuoka, on the island of Kyūshū. The name "kōgoishi...
Kōgoishi - Wikipedia
Japanese castes under the ritsuryō
Ryōmin (良民) and Senmin (賤民) were the two main castes of the classical Japan caste system. When the Ritsuryō legal system was starting to be enforced in Japan at the end of the 7th century, it ...
Former Nine Years War
The Zenkunen War (前九年の役, Zenkunen no Eki), also known in English as the Former Nine Years War or the Early Nine Years War, was fought from 1051 to 1063, in Japan's Mutsu Province, at the far n...
Katsuogi
Katsuogi (鰹木, 堅魚木, 勝男木, 葛緒木) or Kasoegi (斗木) are short, decorative logs found on Japanese and Shinto architecture. They are placed at a right angle along the ridge of roofs, and are usually f...
Katsuogi - Wikipedia