Constantine the Great and Christianity
While the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337) ruled, Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. Historians remain uncertain about Constantine's re...
Constantine the Great and Christianity - Wikipedia
Trump visits the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem
President Trump and his family visited the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in the Old City of Jerusalem on May 22.
Unsealing Of Christ's Reputed Tomb Turns Up New Revelations
For just 60 hours, researchers have had the opportunity to examine the holiest site in Christianity. Here's what they've found.
Persecution of early Christians in the Roman Empire
The anti-Christian policies or persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire occurred intermittently over a period of about three centuries until the 313 Edict of Milan issued by Emperors Constantine ...
Persecution of early Christians in the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
Diocletianic Persecution
The Diocletianic or Great Persecution was the last and most severe persecution of Christians in the Roman empire. In 303, the Emperors Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius, and Constantius issued a series o...
Diocletianic Persecution - Wikipedia
State church of the Roman Empire
Nicene Christianity became the state church of the Roman Empire with the Edict of Thessalonica in AD 380, when Emperor Theodosius I made it the Empire's sole authorized religion. The Eastern Orthodox ...
State church of the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
Fifty Bibles of Constantine
The Fifty Bibles of Constantine were Bibles in Greek language commissioned in 331 by Constantine I and prepared by Eusebius of Caesarea. They were made for the use of the Bishop of Constantinople in t...
Fifty Bibles of Constantine - Wikipedia
Constantine I turn against Paganism
The anti-paganism policy of Constantine I evolved from the initial prohibition on the construction of new temples and the toleration of Pagan sacrifices, to orders for the pillaging and the tearing do...
Constantine I turn against Paganism - Wikipedia
Decline of Greco-Roman polytheism
Religion in the Greco-Roman world at the time of the Constantinian shift mostly comprised three main currents:Early Christianity grew gradually in Rome and the Roman Empire from the 1st to 4th centuri...
Decline of Greco-Roman polytheism - Wikipedia
Constantine I and the bishops of Rome
Constantine I's relationship with the four Bishops of Rome during his reign is an important component of the history of the Papacy, and more generally the history of the Catholic Church.The legend sur...
Constantine I and the bishops of Rome - Wikipedia
Constantinian shift
Constantinian shift is a term used by Nontrinitarian Christians, as well as Anabaptist and Post-Christendom theologians, to describe the political and theological aspects of the 4th-century process of...
Constantinian shift - Wikipedia
Early centers of Christianity
Early Christianity (generally considered the time period from its start to 325), spread from the Eastern Mediterranean throughout the Roman Empire and beyond, reaching as far east as India. Originally...
Early centers of Christianity - Wikipedia
Symmachean forgeries
The Symmachean forgeries are a sheaf of forged documents produced in the papal curia of Pope Symmachus (498—514) in the beginning of the sixth century, in the same cycle that produced the Liber Pontif...
Symmachean forgeries - Wikipedia
Eusebius of Nicomedia
Eusebius of Nicomedia (died 341) was the man who baptised Constantine the Great. He was a bishop of Berytus (modern-day Beirut) in Phoenicia, then of the See of Nicomedia, where the imperial court res...
First Council of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecum...
First Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia
Neoplatonism
Neoplatonism (or Neo-Platonism) is a modern term used to designate a tradition of philosophy that arose in the 3rd century AD and persisted until shortly after the closing of the Platonic Academy in A...
Arian controversy
The Arian controversy describes several controversies between the priest and theologian Arius and the Church Father, Bishop Athanasius related to Christology which divided the Catholic Church from bef...
Arian controversy - Wikipedia
Constantinianism
Constantinianism refers to those policies said to be enacted, encouraged, or personally favored by Constantine the Great, a 4th-century Roman Emperor. In particular, it may refer to any of the followi...
Constantinianism - Wikipedia
Labarum
The labarum (Greek: λάβαρον) was a vexillum (military standard) that displayed the "Chi-Rho" symbol ☧, a christogram formed from the first two Greek letters of the word "Christ" (Greek: ΧΡΙΣΤΟ...
Labarum - Wikipedia
Domus Aurea (Antioch)
Domus Aurea (in English Golden House) or the Great Church in Antioch was the cathedral where the Patriarch of Antioch preached. It was one of the churches whose construction was started during the rei...
Domus Aurea (Antioch) - Wikipedia
Donatist
Donatism (Latin: Donatismus, Greek: Δονατισμός Donatismos) was a Christian sect within the Roman province of Africa that flourished in the fourth and fifth centuries among Berber Christians. D...
Donatist - Wikipedia
Elevation of the Holy Cross
The Elevation of the Holy Cross (also known as the Exaltation of the Holy Cross) is one of the Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church, celebrated on September 14. It is one of the two feast days which is...
Christian persecution of paganism under Theodosius I
The Christian persecution of paganism under Theodosius I began in 381, after the first couple of years of his reign as co-emperor in the eastern part of the Roman Empire. In the 380s, Theodosius I re...
Christian persecution of paganism under Theodosius I - Wikipedia
Old St. Peter's Basilica
Old St. Peter's Basilica was the building that stood, from the 4th to 16th centuries, on the spot where the new St. Peter's Basilica stands today in Vatican City. Construction of the basilica, built o...
Old St. Peter's Basilica - Wikipedia
Pentarchy
"Pentarchy" (from the Greek Πενταρχία, Pentarchia from πέντε pente, "five", and ἄρχω archo, "to rule") is a term in the history of Christianity for the idea of universal rule over all of Christendom b...
Pentarchy - Wikipedia
John and Paul
For the musical partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, see Lennon–McCartneyJohn and Paul are saints in the Roman Catholic Church. They were martyred at Rome on 26 June. They should not be co...
John and Paul - Wikipedia
Constantine I and Christianity
While the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337) ruled, Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. Historians remain uncertain about Constantine's re...
Constantine I and Christianity - Wikipedia
Persecution of Christians in the New Testament
The persecution of Christians in the New Testament is an important part of the Early Christian narrative which depicts the early Church as being persecuted for their heterodox beliefs by a Jewish esta...