Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art (colloquially The Met), located in New York City, is the largest art museum in the United States and one of the ten largest in the world. Its permanent collection contai...
Metropolitan Museum of Art - Wikipedia
Copake Grange Hall
Copake Grange Hall, also known as Copake Grange #935, is a historic Grange hall located at Copake in Columbia County, New York. It was built in 1902-1903, with additions in 1906 and 1921. It is a tw...
Coal Palace
The Coal Palace was a temporary exhibition center that stood in Ottumwa, Iowa from 1890 until 1892. It was used most prominently to showcase the local coal mining industry.During its brief history Pre...
Coal Palace - Wikipedia
British Museum
The British Museum is a museum dedicated to human history and culture, located in the Bloomsbury area of London.Its permanent collection, numbering some 8 million works, is among the largest and most ...
British Museum - Wikipedia
Arts and Industries Building
The Arts and Industries Building is the second oldest of the Smithsonian museums on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Initially named the National Museum, it was built to provide the Smithsonian ...
Arts and Industries Building - Wikipedia
Royal Manchester Institution
The Royal Manchester Institution (RMI) was an English learned society founded on 1 October 1823 at a public meeting held in the Exchange Room by Manchester merchants, local artists and others keen to ...
Royal Manchester Institution - Wikipedia
St. George Opera House
The St. George Opera House, also known as the St. George Social Hall, is a historic building in St. George, Utah. It was originally built by the St. George Gardeners' Club as a wine cellar. As wine de...
Ashmolean Museum
The Ashmolean Museum (in full the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology) on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world's first university museum. Its first building was built in 1678–1683 to ho...
Ashmolean Museum - Wikipedia
Temple of Human Passions
The Temple of Human Passions (French: Pavillon des passions humaines, Dutch: Tempel van de menselijke driften), also known as Pavillon Horta-Lambeaux, is a neoclassical pavilion in the form of...
Temple of Human Passions - Wikipedia
I.O.O.F. Hall (Woodbridge, California)
The I.O.O.F. Hall in Woodbridge, California was built in 1861 in Early Commercial architectural style. It served historically as a clubhouse and as a business. It was listed on the National Register...
I.O.O.F. Hall (Woodbridge, California) - Wikipedia
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum documents the life of the 16th U.S. President, Abraham Lincoln, and the course of the American Civil War. Combining traditional scholarship with 21s...
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum - Wikipedia
Pennsylvania Barge Club
Pennsylvania Barge Club is an amateur rowing club, situated along the historic Boathouse Row of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was founded in 1861 and joined the Schuylkill Navy in 1865. The Club's ...
Pennsylvania Barge Club - Wikipedia
Lynn Shelton American Legion Post No. 27
The Lynn Shelton American Legion Post No. 27 is a historic clubhouse at 28 South College Avenue in Fayetteville, Arkansas. It is a two-story stone building, designed by local architect T. Ewing Shelt...
Gifford Grange Hall
The Gifford Grange Hall is a historic Grange hall located in Guilderland, Albany County, New York. It was built about 1866 as a general store and post office. It is a plain, two story frame commerci...
Odd Fellows Hall (La Grange, California)
The Odd Fellows Hall in La Grange, California was built in 1855. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. It served historically as a clubhouse and as a meeting hall.
Odd Fellows Hall (La Grange, California) - Wikipedia
Carré d'Art
The Carré d'art at Nîmes in southern France houses a museum of contemporary art and the city's library. Constructed of glass, concrete and steel, it faces the Maison Carrée, a perfectly preserved Roma...
Carré d'Art - Wikipedia