Sallustius of Emesa
Sallustius (Greek: Σαλούστιος; 5th century) of Emesa was a Cynic philosopher, who lived in the latter part of the 5th century AD. His father Basilides was a Syrian; his mother Theoclea a native of...
Dio Chrysostom
Dio Chrysostom (/ˈdiːoʊ ˈkrɪsəstəm, krɪˈsɒstəm/; Greek: Δίων Χρυσόστομος Dion Chrysostomos), Dion of Prusa or Dio Cocceianus (c. 40 – c. 115), was a Greek orator, writer, philosopher and historian...
Dio Chrysostom - Wikipedia
Diogenes syndrome
Diogenes syndrome, also known as senile squalor syndrome, is a disorder characterized by extreme self-neglect, domestic squalor, social withdrawal, apathy, compulsive hoarding of garbage, and lack of ...
Secundus the Silent
Secundus the Silent (2nd century AD) was a Cynic or Neopythagorean philosopher who lived in Athens in the early 2nd century, who had taken a vow of silence. An anonymous text entitled Life of Secundus...
Secundus the Silent - Wikipedia
Sotades
Sotades (Greek: Σωτάδης; 3rd century BC) was an Ancient Greek poet.Sotades was born in Maroneia, either the one in Thrace, or in Crete. He was the chief representative of the writers of obscene a...
Sotades - Wikipedia
Antisthenes
Antisthenes (/ænˈtɪsθɨniːz/; Greek: Ἀντισθένης; c. 445 – c. 365 BC) was a Greek philosopher and a pupil of Socrates. Antisthenes first learned rhetoric under Gorgias before becoming an ardent disc...
Antisthenes - Wikipedia
Onesicritus
Onesicritus (Greek: Ὀνησίκριτος; c. 360 BC – c. 290 BC), a Greek historical writer, who accompanied Alexander on his campaigns in Asia. He claimed to have been the commander of Alexander's fleet b...
Onesicritus - Wikipedia
Crates of Thebes
Crates (Greek: Κράτης; c. 365 – c. 285 BC) of Thebes was a Cynic philosopher. Crates gave away his money to live a life of poverty on the streets of Athens. He married Hipparchia of Maroneia who ...
Crates of Thebes - Wikipedia
Cleomenes the Cynic
Cleomenes (/kliːˈɒmɨniːz/; Greek: Κλεομένης; fl. c. 300 BCE) was a Cynic philosopher. He was a pupil of Crates of Thebes, and is said to have taught Timarchus of Alexandria and Echecles of Ephesus, th...
Cleomenes the Cynic - Wikipedia
Bion of Borysthenes
Bion of Borysthenes (Greek: Βίων Βορυσθενίτης, gen.: Βίωνος; c. 325 – c. 250 BC), was a Greek philosopher. After being sold into slavery, and then released, he moved to Athens, where he studied in...
Menippus
Menippus of Gadara (/məˈnɪpəs/; Greek: Μένιππος; fl. 3rd century BC) was a Cynic satirist. His works, which are all lost, were an important influence on Varro and Lucian. The Menippean satire genr...
Menippus - Wikipedia
Philiscus of Aegina
Philiscus of Aegina (Greek: Φιλίσκος; 4th century BC) was a Cynic philosopher from Aegina who lived in the latter half of the 4th century BC. He was the son of Onesicritus who sent Philiscus and h...
List of Cynic philosophers
This is a list of Cynic philosophers, ordered (roughly) by date. The criteria for inclusion in this list is fairly mild. See also Category:Cynic philosophers.
List of Cynic philosophers - Wikipedia
Horus (athlete)
Horus (fl. 4th century) was a Cynic philosopher and Olympic boxer who was victorious at the Olympic games in Antioch in 364.He was born in Egypt, son of one Valens; Horus was originally a student of r...
Asclepiades the Cynic
Asclepiades (Greek: Ἀσκληπιάδης; fl. 4th century) was a Cynic philosopher. He is mentioned by the emperor Julian whom Asclepiades visited at Antioch in 362. Ammianus Marcellinus describes how Ascl...
Pancrates of Athens
Pancrates (Greek: Παγκρατης; fl. c. 140 AD) of Athens, was a Cynic philosopher. Philostratus relates, that when the celebrated sophist Lollianus was in danger of being stoned by the Athenians in a...
Diodorus of Aspendus
Diodorus of Aspendus, was a Pythagorean philosopher, who lived in the 4th century BC, and was an acquaintance of Stratonicus the musician. Diodorus is said to have adopted a Cynic way of life, "lettin...
Diodorus of Aspendus - Wikipedia
Metrocles
Metrocles (Greek: Μητροκλῆς; fl. c. 325 BC) was a Cynic philosopher from Maroneia. He studied in Aristotle’s Lyceum under Theophrastus, and eventually became a follower of Crates of Thebes who married...
Cercidas
Cercidas (or Kerkidas, Greek: Κερκιδᾰς; 3rd century BCE) was a poet, Cynic philosopher, and legislator for his native city Megalopolis. A papyrus roll containing fragments from seven of his Cynic ...
Zoilus
Zoilus or Zoilos (Greek: Ζωΐλος; c. 400 – 320 BC) was a Greek grammarian, Cynic philosopher, and literary critic from Amphipolis in East Macedonia, then known as Thrace. Took the name Homeromastix...
István Cs. Bartos
István Csaba Bartos ([ˈbɑːrtɔʃ]; AKA Bartos the Great Human Muck Pit) is a Hungarian performance artist and spoken word performer mostly known for his notorious subversive acts in which he eats dirt, ...
Monimus
Monimus (/ˈmɒnəməs/; Greek: Μόνιμος; 4th century BCE) of Syracuse, was a Cynic philosopher.According to Diogenes Laërtius, Monimus was the slave of a Corinthian money-changer who heard tales about Dio...
Monimus - Wikipedia
Menedemus the Cynic
Menedemus (Greek: Μενέδημος; fl. 3rd century BC) was a Cynic philosopher, and a pupil of the Epicurean Colotes of Lampsacus. Diogenes Laërtius states that he used to go about garbed as a Fury, pro...
Meleager of Gadara
Meleager of Gadara (Greek: Μελέαγρος; 1st century BCE) was a poet and collector of epigrams. He wrote some satirical prose, now lost, and he wrote some sensual poetry, of which 134 epigrams surviv...
Diogenes and Alexander
The meeting of Diogenes of Sinope and Alexander the Great is one of the most well-discussed anecdotes from philosophical history. Many versions of it exist. The most popular relate it as evidence of...
Diogenes and Alexander - Wikipedia
Peregrinus Proteus
Peregrinus Proteus (Greek: Περεγρῖνος Πρωτεύς; c. 95 – 165 AD) was a Greek Cynic philosopher, from Parium in Mysia. Leaving home at a young age, he first lived with the Christians in Palestine, before...
Theagenes of Patras
Theagenes (Greek: Θεαγένης; fl. c. 160 AD) of Patras, was a Cynic philosopher and close friend of Peregrinus Proteus.He is known principally as a character who appears in Lucian's The Death of Per...
Hipparchia of Maroneia
Hipparchia of Maroneia (/hɪˈpɑrkiə/; Greek: Ἱππαρχία; fl. c. 325 BC) was a Cynic philosopher, and wife of Crates of Thebes. She was born in Maroneia, but her family moved to Athens, where Hipparch...
Hipparchia of Maroneia - Wikipedia