Dacia
In ancient geography, especially in Roman sources, Dacia (/ˈdeɪʃiə, -ʃə/) was the land inhabited by the Dacians. The Greeks referred to them as the Getae, which were specifically a branch of the Thrac...
Dacia - Wikipedia
The Colossal Head of Decebalus, King of the Dacians
In the heart of Rome stands a 38m tall column built in the 2nd century A.D. Carved in low relief spiralling around the monument are over 2600 figures, representing the combatants of wars fought in a d...
Gold Looted From Ancient Empire Returned to Romania
The first of what archaeologist Barbara Deppert-Lippitz calls the "most sensational finds of the last century" surfaced not in a museum but at Christie's in New York. Among more than a hundred pieces ...
Dacian language
The extinct Dacian language developed from Proto-Indo-European (PIE), possibly in the Carpathian region sometime in the period 3000–1500 BC. The language was probably extinct by AD 600. In the 1st cen...
Dacian language - Wikipedia
Davae
Dava (plural davae) is a Geto-Dacian name for a city, town or fortress. Generally, the name indicated a tribal center or an important settlement, usually fortified. Some of the Dacian settlements and ...
Davae - Wikipedia
List of Dacian towns
This is a list of ancient cities, towns, villages, and fortresses in and around Thrace and Dacia. A number of these settlements were Dacian and Thracian, but some were Celtic, Greek, Roman, Paeonian, ...
List of Dacian towns - Wikipedia
Trajan's Dacian Wars
The Dacian Wars (101–102, 105–106) were two military campaigns fought between the Roman Empire and Dacia during Roman Emperor Trajan's rule. The conflicts were triggered by the constant Dacian threat ...
Trajan's Dacian Wars - Wikipedia
Roman Dacia
Roman Dacia (also Dacia Traiana and Dacia Felix) was a province of the Roman Empire from 106 to 274–275 AD. Its territory consisted of eastern and south-eastern Transylvania, the Banat, and Oltenia (r...
Roman Dacia - Wikipedia
Dacians
The Dacians (/ˈdeɪʃənz/; Latin: Daci, Ancient Greek: Δάκοι, Δάοι, Δάκαι) were an Indo-European people, part of or related to the Thracians. Dacians were the ancient inhabitants of Dacia, loca...
Dacians - Wikipedia
List of rulers of Thrace and Dacia
This article lists rulers of Thrace and Dacia, and includes Thracian, Paeonian, Celtic, Dacian, Scythian, Persian or Ancient Greek up to the point of itsfall to the Roman empire, with a few figures fr...
List of rulers of Thrace and Dacia - Wikipedia
Paleo-Balkan mythology
Paleo-Balkan mythology includes the religious practices of the Dacians, Thracians, and Illyrians. Little is known about the rituals and mythology of the Iron Age Balkans, but some of their gods are de...
Paleo-Balkan mythology - Wikipedia
History of Cluj-Napoca
The history of Cluj-Napoca covers the time from the Roman conquest of Dacia, when it was known as Napoca, through its flourishing as the main cultural and religious center in the historic province of ...
History of Cluj-Napoca - Wikipedia
List of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia
This is a list of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia (Ancient Greek: Θρᾴκη; Δακία) including possibly or partly Thracian or Dacian tribes, and non-Thracian or non-Dacian tribes that inhabited the...
List of ancient tribes in Thrace and Dacia - Wikipedia
Hârșova
Hârșova (also spelled Hîrșova; [ˈhɨrʃova]; Bulgarian: Хърсово, Harsovo) is a town located on the right bank of the Danube, in Constanţa County, Romania.The village of Vadu Oii is administered by t...
Hârșova - Wikipedia
Quemedava
Quemedava was an ancient Dacian city in Dardania mentioned by Procopius.
Quemedava - Wikipedia
Piroboridava
Piroboridava (Ancient Greek: Πιροβορίδαυα) was a Dacian town mentioned by Ptolemy, and archaeologically identified at Poiana, Galați, Romania. Second part name of the city Dacian dava shows signi...
Piroboridava - Wikipedia
Castra of Călugăreni
The castra of Călugăreni was a fort in the Roman province of Dacia. The fort was erected in the 2nd century AD. Archaeological research also proved the existence of a nearby canabae. Abandoned in...