'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
James Anthony Froude
James Anthony Froude (/ˈfruːd/ FROOD; 23 April 1818 – 20 October 1894) was an English historian, novelist, biographer, and editor of Fraser's Magazine. From his upbringing amidst the Anglo-Catholic Ox...
James Anthony Froude - Wikipedia
Aristotle
Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384 – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the Macedonian city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on...
Aristotle - Wikipedia
Jonathan Leavitt (minister)
Rev. Jonathan Leavitt (1731–1802) was an early New England Congregational minister, born in Connecticut, and subsequently the pastor of churches in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, both of which...
Jonathan Leavitt (minister) - Wikipedia
Politics (Aristotle)
Politics (Greek: Πολιτικά) is a work of political philosophy by Aristotle, a fourth-century BC Greek philosopher. The end of the Nicomachean Ethics declared that the inquiry into ethics necessaril...
Politics (Aristotle) - Wikipedia
Proslavery
Proslavery ideology arose in the antebellum United States. It began as a reaction to the growing antislavery movement in the United States in the late 18th century and early 19th century.
Until th...
Pope Nicholas V
Pope Nicholas V (Latin: Nicholaus V) (15 November 1397 – 24 March 1455), born Tommaso Parentucelli, was Pope from 6 March 1447 until his death in 1455. The Pontificate of Nicholas saw the fal...
Pope Nicholas V - Wikipedia
Samuel Morse
Samuel Finley Breese Morse (April 27, 1791 – April 2, 1872) was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to...
Samuel Morse - Wikipedia
John Mitchel
John Mitchel (Irish: Seán Mistéal; 3 November 1815 – 20 March 1875) was an activist for Irish nationalism, author,and political journalist. Born in Camnish, near Dungiven, County Londonderry, Irel...
John Mitchel - Wikipedia
Organon
The Organon (Greek: Ὄργανον, meaning "instrument, tool, organ") is the standard collection of Aristotle's six works on logic. The name Organon was given by Aristotle's followers, the Peripatetics. The...
Samuel Seabury (1801–1872)
Samuel Seabury (1801–1872) was an American Protestant Episcopal clergyman, grandson of Bishop Samuel Seabury. He was born at New London, Conn., was ordained priest in the Protestant Episcopal church (...
Samuel Seabury (1801–1872) - Wikipedia
James Penny
James Penny (died 1799) was a merchant, slaveship owner and prominent anti-abolitionist in Liverpool, England. He defended the slave trade to the British Parliament. Penny Lane in Liverpool, later imm...
Antipope Nicholas V
Nicholas V, born Pietro Rainalducci (c. 1260 – 16 October 1333) was an antipope in Italy from 12 May 1328 to 25 July 1330 during the pontificate of Pope John XXII (1316–34) at Avignon. He was the last...
Poetics (Aristotle)
Aristotle's Poetics (Greek: Περὶ ποιητικῆς, Latin: De Poetica; c. 335 BCE) is the earliest surviving work of dramatic theory and the first extant philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory...
Poetics (Aristotle) - Wikipedia
Carlyle's House
Carlyle's House, in the district of Chelsea, in central London, England, was the home acquired by the historian and philosopher Thomas Carlyle and his wife Jane Welsh Carlyle, after having lived at C...
Carlyle's House - Wikipedia
Furnifold McLendel Simmons
Furnifold McLendel Simmons (January 20, 1854 – April 30, 1940) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from March 4, 1887 to March 4, 1889 and U.S. senator...
Furnifold McLendel Simmons - Wikipedia
Daniel Harvey Hill
Daniel Harvey Hill (July 12, 1821 – September 24, 1889) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War and a Southern scholar. He was known as an aggressive leader, and as an austere, ...
Daniel Harvey Hill - Wikipedia
George Wilson Bridges
Reverend George Wilson Bridges (1788–1863) was a writer, photographer and Anglican cleric. After eloping with his wife, he was Rector for the Jamaican parish of St Dorothy until late 1817, and then Ma...
George Wilson Bridges - Wikipedia
Thomas Carlyle and His Works
Thomas Carlyle and His Works is an essay written by Henry David Thoreau that praises the writings of Thomas Carlyle.It demonstrates a few themes that show up elsewhere in Thoreau’s writings. First of...
Thomas Carlyle and His Works - Wikipedia
Benjamin M. Palmer
Benjamin Morgan Palmer (January 25, 1818 – May 25, 1902), an orator and Presbyterian theologian, was the first moderator of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America. As pasto...
Benjamin M. Palmer - Wikipedia
Club de Clichy
During the French Revolution, the Club de Clichy formed in 1794, following the fall of Robespierre, 9 Thermidor an II (27 July 1794). The political club that came to be called the Clichyens met in roo...
Club de Clichy - Wikipedia
James Henley Thornwell
James Henley Thornwell (December 9, 1812 – August 1, 1862) was an American Presbyterian preacher and religious writer.
Born in Marlboro County, South Carolina, on December 9, 1812, Thornwell...
James Henley Thornwell - Wikipedia
Term logic
In philosophy, term logic, also known as traditional logic or Aristotelian logic, is a loose name for the way of doing logic that began with Aristotle and that was dominant until the advent of modern ...
Four causes
"Four causes" refers to an influential principle in Aristotelian thought whereby causes of change or movement are categorized into four fundamental types of answer to the question "why?". Aristotle wr...
James Habersham
James Habersham (c. 1712 – 1775) was a pioneering merchant and statesman in the British North American colony of Georgia. Habersham is credited with opening the first direct trade between Savannah, Ge...