Dendrite
Dendrites (from Greek δένδρον déndron, "tree") are the branched projections of a neuron that act to propagate the electrochemical stimulation received from other neural cells to the cell body, or soma...
Dendrite - Wikipedia
Neurons forming connections in vitro.... - Neuroscience News and Research
Neurons forming connections in vitro. via mymedicalwall
New 'Artificial Synapses' Could Let Supercomputers Mimic the Human Brain
Brain-like machines with human-like abilities to solve problems could become a reality, researchers say.
How Synapses Work
Salk scientists computationally reconstructed brain tissue in the hippocampus to study the sizes of connections (synapses). The larger the synapse, the more likely the neuron will send a signal to a n...
Boston University's 3D map reveals tiny connections between cells
Harvard University researchers hope the map could be used to identify unusual connections between brain cells that could shed light on disorders such as bipolar and depression.
Synapse
From a DVD that comes with the illustrated medical atlas, The Human Brain, DK Publishing UK.
Synapse - Animation
Neural synapse. Acetlycoline http://youtube.com/group/scienceeducation.
Synapse
In the nervous system, a synapse is a structure that permits a neuron (or nerve cell) to pass an electrical or chemical signal to another cell (neural or otherwise). Santiago Ramón y Cajal proposed th...
Synapse - Wikipedia
Dendritic filopodia
Dendritic filopodia are small, membranous protrusions found primarily on dendritic stretches of developing neurons. These structures may receive synaptic input, and can develop into dendritic spines. ...
Dendritic spine
A dendritic spine (or spine) is a small membranous protrusion from a neuron's dendrite that typically receives input from a single synapse of an axon. Dendritic spines serve as a storage site for syna...
Dendritic spine - Wikipedia
Nissl body
A Nissl body, also known as Nissl or tigroid substance, is a large granular body found in neurons. These granules are rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) with rosettes of free ribosomes, and are the sit...
Nissl body - Wikipedia
Basal dendrite
A basal dendrite is a dendrite that emerges from the base of a pyramidal cell that receives information from nearby neurons and passes it to the soma, or cell body.
Apical dendrite
An apical dendrite is a dendrite that emerges from the apex of a pyramidal cell. Apical dendrites are one of two primary categories of dendrites, and they distinguish the pyramidal cells from spiny st...
Postsynaptic potential
Postsynaptic potentials are changes in the membrane potential of the postsynaptic terminal of a chemical synapse. Postsynaptic potentials are graded potentials, and should not be confused with acti...
Postsynaptic potential - Wikipedia
Perikaryon
The soma (pl. somata or somas), or perikaryon (pl. perikarya), or cyton, is the bulbous end of a neuron, containing the cell nucleus. The word "soma" comes from the Greek σῶμα, meaning "body"; the som...
Neurotrophin
Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that induce the survival, development, and function of neurons.They belong to a class of growth factors, secreted proteins that are capable of signaling particu...
Neurotrophin - Wikipedia
Long-term potentiation
In neuroscience, long-term potentiation (LTP) is a persistent strengthening of synapses based on recent patterns of activity. These are patterns of synaptic activity that produce a long-lasting increa...
Long-term potentiation - Wikipedia
Neural stem cell
Neural stem cells (NSCs) are self-renewing, multipotent cells that generate the main phenotype of the nervous system. Stem cells are characterized by their capability to differentiate into multiple ce...
Gap junction
A gap junction may also be called a nexus or macula communicans. When found in nerves they are also referred to as an electrical synapse. An ephapse by modern definition is not a gap junction. See Eph...
Gap junction - Wikipedia
Connexin
Connexins, or gap junction proteins, are a family of structurally related transmembrane proteins that assemble to form vertebrate gap junctions (an entirely different family of proteins, the innexins,...
Connexin - Wikipedia
Autoreceptor
An autoreceptor is a receptor located in presynaptic nerve cell membranes which serves as a part of a negative feedback loop in signal transduction. It is sensitive only to those neurotransmitters or ...
Autoreceptor - Wikipedia
Synaptotropic hypothesis
The synaptotropic hypothesis, also called the synaptotrophic hypothesis, is a neurobiological hypothesis of neuronal growth and synapse formation. The hypothesis was first formulated by J.E. Vaughn in...
Synaptic plasticity
In neuroscience, synaptic plasticity is the ability of synapses to strengthen or weaken over time, in response to increases or decreases in their activity. Plastic change also results from the alterat...
Axon
An axon (from Greek ἄξων áxōn, axis), also known as a nerve fibre, is a long, slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that typically conducts electrical impulses away from the neuron's cell bod...
Axon - Wikipedia
Neurotransmitter
Neurotransmitters are endogenous chemicals that transmit signals across a synapse from one neuron (nerve cell) to another 'target' neuron. Neurotransmitters are released from synaptic vesicles in syna...
Active zone
The active zone or synaptic active zone is a term first used by Couteaux and Pecot-Dechavassinein in 1970 to define the site of neurotransmitter release. Two neurons make contact through structures ca...
Active zone - Wikipedia
Ribbon synapse
The ribbon synapse is a type of neuronal synapse characterized by unique mechanisms of multivesicular release and calcium channel positioning that promote rapid neurotransmitter release and signal tra...
Electrical synapse
An electrical synapse is a mechanical and electrically conductive link between two abutting neurons that is formed at a narrow gap between the pre- and postsynaptic neurons known as a gap junction. A...
Neuromuscular junction
The neuromuscular junction connects the nervous system to the muscular system via synapses between efferent nerve fibers and muscle fibers, also known as muscle cells. As an action potential reaches t...
Neuromuscular junction - Wikipedia