Deontological ethics
Deontological ethics or deontology is the normative ethical position that judges the morality of an action based on the action's adherence to a rule or rules. It is sometimes described as "duty-" or "...
Divine command theory
Divine command theory is a meta-ethical theory which proposes that an action's status as morally good is equivalent to whether it is commanded by God. The theory asserts that what is moral is determin...
Divine command theory - Wikipedia
Kantian ethics
Kantian ethics refers to a deontological ethical theory ascribed to the German philosopher Immanuel Kant. The theory, developed as a result of Enlightenment rationalism, is based on the view that the ...
Kantian ethics - Wikipedia
Non-aggression principle
The Non-Aggression Principle – also called the Non-Aggression Axiom – is the idea that each person has the right to make his or her own choices in life so long as they do not involve aggression, defin...
Non-aggression principle - Wikipedia
Kantianism
Kantianism is the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, a German philosopher born in Königsberg, Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia). The term "Kantianism" or "Kantian" is sometimes also used to describe contemp...
Robert Nozick
Robert Nozick (/ˈnoʊzɪk/; November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher who was most prominent in the 1970s and 1980s. He was a professor at Harvard University. He is best kno...
Natural-rights libertarianism
Natural-rights libertarianism, also known as deontological libertarianism, philosophical libertarianism, deontological liberalism, rights-theorist libertarianism, natural rights-based libertarianism, ...
On the Basis of Morality
On the Basis of Morality (German: Über die Grundlage der Moral, 1840) is one of Arthur Schopenhauer's major works in ethics, in which he argues that morality stems from compassion. Schopenhauer be...
Categorical imperative
The categorical imperative (German: kategorischer Imperativ) is the central philosophical concept in the deontological moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Introduced in Kant's 1785 Grounding for t...
Duty
Duty (from "due" meaning "that which is owing"; Old French: deu, did, past participle of devoir; Latin: debere, debitum, whence "debt") is a term that conveys a sense of moral commitment or ob...
Duty - Wikipedia
Original position
The original position is a hypothetical situation developed by American philosopher John Rawls as a thought experiment to replace the imagery of a savage state of nature of prior political philosopher...
Critique of Practical Reason
The Critique of Practical Reason (German: Kritik der praktischen Vernunft, KpV) is the second of Immanuel Kant's three critiques, first published in 1788. It follows on from Kant's Critique of Pu...
Critique of Practical Reason - Wikipedia
Schopenhauer's criticism of Kant's schemata
Schopenhauer's criticism of Kant's schemata is part of Schopenhauer's criticism of the Kantian philosophy which was published in 1819. In the appendix to the first volume of his main work, Arthur Scho...
Schopenhauer's criticism of Kant's schemata - Wikipedia
Christine Korsgaard
Christine Marion Korsgaard (born 1952) is an American philosopher and academic whose main scholarly interests are in moral philosophy and its history; the relation of issues in moral philosophy to iss...
Neo-Kantianism
Neo-Kantianism refers broadly to a revived type of philosophy along the lines of that laid down by Immanuel Kant in the 18th century, or more specifically by Schopenhauer's criticism of the Kantian ph...
Primary goods
Primary goods are presented in the important book A Theory of Justice (1971) written by the American philosopher John Rawls.Rawls identifies primary goods as the “things that every rational man is pre...
Preformation theory
Preformation theory is a theistic epistemological theory that states that knowledge is possible only because God has endowed humans with certain innate ideas along with dispositions or aptitudes in ce...
Prima facie
Prima facie (/ˈpraɪmə ˈfeɪʃɨ.iː/, /ˈfeɪʃə/, or /ˈfeɪʃiː/; from Latin: prīmā faciē) is a Latin expression meaning on its first encounter or at first sight. The literal translation would be "at firs...
John Rawls
John Bordley Rawls (/rɔːlz/; February 21, 1921 – November 24, 2002) was an American moral and political philosopher. He held the James Bryant Conant University Professorship at Harvard University and ...
John Rawls - Wikipedia
Noumenon
The noumenon (/ˈnɒuːmɨnɒn/) is a posited object or event that is known (if at all) without the use of the senses. The term is generally used in contrast with, or in relation to "phenomenon", which ref...
Doctrine of mental reservation
The doctrine of mental reservation, or of mental equivocation, was a special branch of casuistry (case-based reasoning) developed in the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, and most often associated...
Category (Kant)
In Kant's philosophy, a category is a pure concept of the understanding. A Kantian category is a characteristic of the appearance of any object in general, before it has been experienced. Kant wrote t...
The Law of Peoples
The Law of Peoples is American philosopher John Rawls' work on international relations. First published in 1993 as a short article (1993: Critical Inquiry, no.20), in 1999 it was expanded and joined w...
The Law of Peoples - Wikipedia
Transcendental realism
Transcendental realism is a concept stemming from the philosophy of Immanuel Kant that implies individuals have a perfect understanding of the limitations of their own minds.
Transcendental realis...
Kant (surname)
Kant is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:Fictional characters:
Schema (Kant)
In Kantian philosophy, a transcendental schema (plural: schemata; from Greek: σχῆμα, "form, shape, figure") is the procedural rule by which a category or pure, non-empirical concept is associated wi...
The Critique of Pure Reason
The Critique of Pure Reason (German: Kritik der reinen Vernunft, KrV) by Immanuel Kant, first published in 1781, second edition 1787, is one of the most influential works in the history of philoso...
The Critique of Pure Reason - Wikipedia
Copernican Revolution (metaphor)
The Copernican Revolution, which in terms of astronomy amounted to the acceptance of heliocentrism as suggested by Nicolaus Copernicus, has also been used widely as a metaphor supporting descriptions ...
Pragmatic ethics
Pragmatic ethics is a theory of normative philosophical ethics. Ethical pragmatists, such as John Dewey, believe that some societies have progressed morally in much the way they have attained progres...
Consequentialism
Consequentialism is the class of normative ethical theories holding that the consequences of one's conduct are the ultimate basis for any judgment about the rightness or wrongness of that conduct. Thu...
Consequentialism - Wikipedia