Diversity in early Christian theology
Traditionally, orthodoxy and heresy have been viewed in relation to the "orthodoxy" as an authentic lineage of tradition. Other forms of Christianity were viewed as deviant streams of thought and ther...
Diversity in early Christian theology - Wikipedia
Adoptionism
Adoptionism, sometimes called dynamic monarchianism, is nontrinitarian heretical theological teaching that Jesus was adopted as God's Son either at his baptism, his resurrection, or his ascension. Ac...
Arianism
Arianism is the nontrinitarian, heterodoxical teaching, first attributed to Arius (c. AD 250–336), a Christian presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt, concerning the relationship of God the Father to the Son ...
Arianism - Wikipedia
Ebionites
Ebionites, or Ebionaioi (Greek: Ἐβιωναῖοι; derived from Hebrew אביונים ebyonim, ebionim, meaning "the poor" or "poor ones"), is a patristic term referring to a Jewish Christian movement that existed ...
Ebionites - Wikipedia
Gnosticism
Gnosticism (from Ancient Greek: γνωστικός gnostikos, "learned", from γνῶσις gnōsis, knowledge) describes a collection of ancient religions whose adherents shunned the material world - which they ...
Valentinius
Valentinus (also spelled Valentinius; c.100 – c.160) was the best known and for a time most successful early Christian gnostic theologian. He founded his school in Rome. According to Tertullian, Valen...
Marcion
Marcion of Sinope (/ˈmɑrʃən, -ʃiən, -siən/; Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important leader in early Christianity. His theology rejected the deity described in the Hebrew Scriptu...
Marcion - Wikipedia
Marcionism
Marcionism was an Early Christian dualist belief system that originated in the teachings of Marcion of Sinope at Rome around the year 144.Marcion believed Jesus was the savior sent by God, and Paul th...
Marcionism - Wikipedia
Montanism
Montanism, known by its adherents as the New Prophecy, was an early Christian movement of the late 2nd century, later referred to by the name of its founder, Montanus. Although it came to be labelled...
Development of the New Testament canon
The canon of the New Testament is the set of books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting the New Testament of the Christian Bible. For most, it is an agreed-upon list of twenty-seven...
Gothic Christianity
Gothic Christianity refers to the Christian religion of the Goths and sometimes the Gepids, Vandals, and Burgundians, who may have used Wulfila's translation of the Bible into Gothic and shared common...
Gothic Christianity - Wikipedia
Aeon (Gnosticism)
In many Gnostic systems, various emanations of "God" are known by such names as One, Monad, Aion teleos (αἰών τέλεος "The Broadest Aeon"), Bythos ("depth or profundity", βυθός), Proarkhe ("before th...
Aeon (Gnosticism) - Wikipedia
Gnosticism in modern times
Gnosticism in modern times includes a variety of religious movements, mostly Christian in nature, stemming from the ancient Hellenistic society around the Mediterranean. Although the origins of Gnosti...
Pleroma
Pleroma (Greek πλήρωμα) generally refers to the totality of divine powers. The word means fullness from πληρόω ("I fill") comparable to πλήρης which means "full", and is used in Christian theologica...
Pleroma - Wikipedia
Sophia (wisdom)
Sophia (σοφία, Greek for "wisdom") is a central idea in Hellenistic philosophy and religion, Platonism, Gnosticism, Orthodox Christianity, Esoteric Christianity, as well as Christian mysticism. Sop...
Sophia (wisdom) - Wikipedia
Neoplatonism and Gnosticism
Neoplatonism (also Neo-Platonism) is the modern term for a school of Hellenistic philosophy that took shape in the 3rd century, based on the teachings of Plato and some of his early followers. Neopl...
Neoplatonism and Gnosticism - Wikipedia
Valentinianism
Valentinianism is a Gnostic Christian movement that was founded by Valentinus in the second century AD. Valentinianism was one of the major Gnostic movements. Its influence was extremely widespread, n...
Valentinianism - Wikipedia
Gnosis
Gnosis is the common Greek noun for knowledge (in the nominative case γνῶσις f.). In Christian, Islamic, or Jewish mysticism, mystery religions and Gnosticism gnosis generally signifies a spiritual kn...
Monad (Gnosticism)
The Monad in early Christian gnostic writings is an adaptation of concepts of the Monad in Greek philosophy to Christian gnostic belief systems.
The term monad comes from the Greek feminine noun m...
Gospel of Truth
The Gospel of Truth is one of the Gnostic texts from the New Testament apocrypha found in the Nag Hammadi codices ("NHC"). It exists in two Coptic translations, a Subakhmimic rendition surviving almos...
Neoplatonism and Christianity
Neoplatonism was a major influence on Christian theology throughout Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in the West due to St. Augustine of Hippo, who was influenced by the early Neoplatonists Plotinus...
Abraxas
Abraxas (Gk. ΑΒΡΑΞΑΣ, variant form Abrasax, ΑΒΡΑΣΑΞ) was a word of mystic meaning in the system of the Gnostic Basilides, being there applied to the “Great Archon” (Gk., megas archōn), the princeps of...
Abraxas - Wikipedia
History of Gnosticism
The history of Gnosticism is subject to a great deal of debate and interpretation. The complex nature of Gnostic teaching and the fact that much of the material relating to the schools comprising Gnos...
History of Gnosticism - Wikipedia
List of gnostic terms
The following is a list of vocabulary that many books on gnosticism will assume the reader is familiar with
Marcion of Sinope
Marcion of Sinope (/ˈmɑrʃən, -ʃiən, -siən/; Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important leader in early Christianity. His theology rejected the deity described in the Hebrew Scriptu...
Marcion of Sinope - Wikipedia
Archon
Archon (Greek ἄρχων arkhon; pl. ἄρχοντες) is a Greek word that means "ruler" or "lord," frequently used as the title of a specific public office. It is the masculine present participle of the verb ste...
Archon - Wikipedia
Theodosius I
Theodosius I (Latin: Flavius Theodosius Augustus; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was Roman Emperor from 379 to 395. Theodosius was the last emperor to ...
Theodosius I - Wikipedia
Platonic Academy
23°42′29″E / 37.99250°N 23.70806°E / 37.99250; 23.70806The Academy (Ancient Greek: Ἀκαδημία) was founded by Plato (428/427 BC – 348/347 BC) in ca. 387 BC in Athens. Aristotle ...
Platonic Academy - Wikipedia
Demiurge
In the Platonic, Neopythagorean, Middle Platonic, and Neoplatonic schools of philosophy, the demiurge (/ˈdɛmiˌɜrdʒ/) is an artisan-like figure responsible for the fashioning and maintenance of the phy...
Demiurge - Wikipedia