Dying-and-rising god
A dying-and-rising death-rebirth, or resurrection deity is a related motif where the god dies and is also resurrected. "Death or departure of the gods" is motif A192 in Stith Thompson's Motif-Index...
Dying-and-rising god - Wikipedia
Egyptian god Osiris' 'tomb' discovered
The unusual tomb structure (pictured) was built during the 25th Dynasty between 760 and 525BC and was uncovered at the Al-Gorna necropolis on Luxor’s west bank.
Baal
Baal, also rendered Baʿal (Biblical Hebrew בַּעַל, [ˈbaʕal]), is a North-West Semitic title and honorific meaning "master" or "lord" that is used for various gods who were patrons of cities in the Lev...
Baal - Wikipedia
Melqart
Melqart (Phoenician: 𐤌𐤋𐤊𐤒𐤓𐤕,  Melek-qart, "King of the City"; Akkadian: Milqartu) was the tutelary god of the Phoenician city of Tyre. Melqart was often titled Ba‘l Ṣūr, "Lord of...
Melqart - Wikipedia
Adonis
Adonis (/əˈdɒnɪs, əˈdoʊnɪs/; Greek: Ἄδωνις), in Greek mythology, is the god of beauty and desire, and is a central figure in various mystery religions. His religion belonged to women: the dying of Ado...
Adonis - Wikipedia
Eshmun
Eshmun (or Eshmoun, less accurately Esmun or Esmoun; Phoenician: lʾšmn) was a Phoenician god of healing and the tutelary god of Sidon.This god was known at least from the Iron Age period at Sidon and ...
Eshmun - Wikipedia
Tammuz (deity)
Tammuz (Syriac: ܬܡܘܙ; Hebrew: תַּמּוּז, Transliterated Hebrew: Tammuz, Tiberian Hebrew: Tammûz; Arabic: تمّوز‎ Tammūz; Akkadian: Duʾzu, Dūzu; Sumerian: Dumuzid (DUMU.ZI(D), "faithful...
Tammuz (deity) - Wikipedia
Ra
or or Ra /rɑː/ or Re /reɪ/ (Egyptian: 𓂋ꜥ, rˤ) is the ancient Egyptian solar deity. By the Fifth Dynasty (2494 to 2345 BCE) he had become a major god in ancient Egyptian religion, identified prim...
Ra - Wikipedia
Jesus
Jesus (/ˈdʒiːzəs/; Greek: Ἰησοῦς Iesous; 7–2 BC to 30–33 AD), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity, whom the teachings of most Christian denominations hol...
Jesus - Wikipedia
Dionysus
Dionysus (/daɪ.əˈnaɪsəs/; Greek: Διόνυσος, Dionysos) is the god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, of ritual madness, fertility, theatre and religious ecstasy in Greek mythology. Alcohol, espe...
Dionysus - Wikipedia
Inanna
Inanna (/ɪˈnænə/ or /ɪˈnɑːnə/; Cuneiform: 𒀭𒈹 (Old Babylonian) or (Neo-Assyrian) MUŠ3; Sumerian: Inanna; Akkadian: Ištar; Unicode: U+12239) was the Sumerian goddess of love, fertility, and warfare, ...
Inanna - Wikipedia
Ishtar
Ishtar (English pronunciation /ˈɪʃtɑːr/; Transliteration: IŠTAR; Akkadian: 𒀭𒈹 ; Sumerian 𒀭𒌋𒁯) is the East Semitic Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war, and sex. She ...
Ishtar - Wikipedia
Persephone
In Greek mythology, Persephone (/pərˈsɛfəniː/, per-SEH-fə-nee; Greek: Περσεφόνη), also called Kore (/ˈkɔəriː/; "the maiden"), is the daughter of Zeus and the harvest goddess Demeter, and is the qu...
Persephone - Wikipedia
Egyptian god Osiris' 'tomb' discovered
The unusual tomb structure (pictured) was built during the 25th Dynasty between 760 and 525BC and was uncovered at the Al-Gorna necropolis on Luxor’s west bank.
Dionysian Mysteries
The Dionysian Mysteries were a ritual of ancient Greece and Rome which used intoxicants and other trance-inducing techniques (like dance and music) to remove inhibitions and social constraints, libera...
Dionysian Mysteries - Wikipedia
Cult of Dionysus
The Cult of Dionysus is strongly associated with satyrs, centaurs, and sileni, and its characteristic symbols are the bull, the serpent, the ivy, and the wine. The Dionysia and Lenaia festivals in Ath...
Cult of Dionysus - Wikipedia
Baal cycle
The Baal Cycle is a Ugaritic cycle of stories about the Canaanite god Baal, also known as Hadad—the god of rain, storm and fertility. They are written in Ugaritic, a language written in a cuneiform al...
Dracanum
Dracanum (Greek Drakanon) on the island of Kos near Samos was one of the sites that disputed with Thebes in mainland Greece for the site of the birth of Dionysus, according to the fragmentary Homeric ...
The Bacchae
The Bacchae (/ˈbækiː/; Greek: Βάκχαι, Bakchai; also known as The Bacchantes /ˈbækənts, bəˈkænts, -ˈkɑːnts/) is an ancient Greek tragedy, written by the Athenian playwright Euripides during his final y...
The Bacchae - Wikipedia
The Birth of Tragedy
The Birth of Tragedy from the Spirit of Music (German: Die Geburt der Tragödie aus dem Geiste der Musik) is an 1872 work of dramatic theory by the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. It was re...
The Birth of Tragedy - Wikipedia
Rape of Persephone
The Rape of Persephone is a classical mythological subject in Western art, depicting the kidnap of Persephone by Hades.Examples include:
Rape of Persephone - Wikipedia
Trickster deity
In mythology, and in the study of folklore and religion, a trickster is a god, goddess, spirit, man, woman, or anthropomorphic animal who exhibits a great degree of intellect or secret knowledge and u...
Trickster deity - Wikipedia
The Frogs
The Frogs (Greek: Βάτραχοι Bátrachoi, "Frogs"; Latin: Ranae, often abbreviated Ran.) is a comedy written by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes. It was performed at the Lenaia, one of the Festiv...
Edonus
Edonus (Ancient Greek: Ἠδωνός) was the mythical ancestor of the Edonians in Thrace and Thracian Macedonia. Son of Ares (god of war) and Calliope (muse of epic poetry). The names Edonus, Edonian, ...
Baal (demon)
Baal (/ˈbeɪl/ BAYL; sometimes spelled Bael, Baël (French), Baell) is in 17th century goetic occult writings one of the seven princes of Hell. The name is drawn from the Canaanite deity Baal mentioned ...
Baal (demon) - Wikipedia
Dionysiaca
The Dionysiaca (Greek: Διονυσιακά) is an ancient epic poem and the principal work of Nonnus. It is an epic in 48 books, the longest surviving poem from antiquity at 20,426 lines, composed in Homeric d...
Dionysiaca - Wikipedia
Jesus Christ in comparative mythology
The study of Jesus Christ in comparative mythology is the examination of the narratives of the life of Jesus in the Christian gospels, traditions and theology, as it relates to Christian mythology and...
Jesus Christ in comparative mythology - Wikipedia
Persephone in popular culture
Persephone appears many times in popular culture, both as a goddess character and through symbolic use of her name.