Global flood toll to triple by 2030
People affected by river flooding worldwide could triple by 2030, with climate change and population growth the main factors, says a new report.
Biosurvey
A biosurvey, or biological survey, is a scientific study of organisms to assess the condition of an ecological resource, such as a water body.
Biosurveys are used by government agencies responsibl...
Global flood toll to triple by 2030
People affected by river flooding worldwide could triple by 2030, with climate change and population growth the main factors, says a new report.
Maximum sustainable yield
In population ecology and economics, maximum sustainable yield or MSY is theoretically, the largest yield (or catch) that can be taken from a species' stock over an indefinite period. Fundamental to ...
Maximum sustainable yield - Wikipedia
Competitive Lotka–Volterra equations
The competitive Lotka–Volterra equations are a simple model of the population dynamics of species competing for some common resource. They can be further generalised to include trophic interactions.<...
Competitive Lotka–Volterra equations - Wikipedia
Ecological yield
Ecological yield is the harvestable population growth of an ecosystem. It is most commonly measured in forestry: sustainable forestry is defined as that which does not harvest more wood in a year tha...
Ecological yield - Wikipedia
Plant cover
The abundances of plant species are often measured by plant cover, i.e. the relative area covered by different plant species in a small plot. Plant cover is not biased by the size and distributions of...
Q10 (temperature coefficient)
The Q10 temperature coefficient is a measure of the rate of change of a biological or chemical system as a consequence of increasing the temperature by 10 °C. There are many examples where the Q10 is ...
Indicator value
Indicator value is a term that has been used in ecology for two different indices. The older usage of the term refers to Ellenberg's indicator values, which are based on a simple ordinal classificatio...
Carrying capacity
The carrying capacity of a biological species in an environment is the maximum population size of the species that the environment can sustain indefinitely, given the food, habitat, water, and other ...
Sustainability metrics and indices
Sustainable development indicators (SDI) are measures of sustainability, and attempt to quantify beyond the generic concept. Though there are disagreements among those from different disciplines (and ...
Population size
In population genetics and population ecology, population size (usually denoted N) is the number of individual organisms in a population.The effective population size (Ne) is defined as "the number of...
Aquatic biomonitoring
Aquatic biomonitoring is the science of inferring the ecological condition of rivers, lakes, streams, and wetlands by examining the organisms that live there. While aquatic biomonitoring is the most c...
Aquatic biomonitoring - Wikipedia
Relative abundance distribution
In the field of ecology, the relative abundance distribution (RAD) or species abundance distribution describes the relationship between the number of species observed in a field study as a function of...
Relative abundance distribution - Wikipedia
Optimum sustainable yield
In population ecology and economics, optimum sustainable yield is the level of effort (LOE) that maximizes the difference between total revenue and total cost. Or, where marginal revenue equals margin...
All-taxa biodiversity inventory
An all-taxa biodiversity inventory, or ATBI, is an attempt to document and identify all biological species living in some defined area, usually a park, reserve, or research area.The first use of the t...
Effective population size
In population genetics, the concept of effective population size Ne was introduced by the American geneticist Sewall Wright. He defined it as "the number of breeding individuals in an idealised popul...
Species diversity
Species diversity is the number of different species that are represented in a given community (a dataset). The effective number of species refers to the number of equally abundant species needed to o...
Species diversity - Wikipedia
Biomass (ecology)
Biomass, in ecology, is the mass of living biological organisms in a given area or ecosystem at a given time. Biomass can refer to species biomass, which is the mass of one or more species, or to comm...
Biomass (ecology) - Wikipedia
Photosynthetic efficiency
The photosynthetic efficiency is the fraction of light energy converted into chemical energy during photosynthesis in plants and algae. Photosynthesis can be described by the simplified chemical react...
Photosynthetic efficiency - Wikipedia
Nicholson–Bailey model
The Nicholson–Bailey model was developed in the 1930s to describe the population dynamics of a coupled host-parasite (or predator-prey) system. It is named after Alexander John Nicholson and Vi...
Cover-abundance
Cover-abundance is a measure of plant cover, used in phytosociology (or vegetation science). It is based on percentages at the top end, but uses abundance estimates for species with a low cover plant ...
Latent extinction risk
In conservation biology, latent extinction risk is a measure of the potential for a species to become threatened.Latent risk can most easily be described as the difference, or discrepancy, between the...
Morisita's overlap index
Morisita's overlap index, named after Masaaki Morisita, is a statistical measure of dispersion of individuals in a population. It is used to compare overlap among samples (Morisita 1959). This formu...
Population model
A population model is a type of mathematical model that is applied to the study of population dynamics.Models allow a better understanding of how complex interactions and processes work. Modeling of d...
Lotka–Volterra equation
The Lotka–Volterra equations, also known as the predator–prey equations, are a pair of first-order, non-linear, differential equations frequently used to describe the dynamics of biological syst...
Lotka–Volterra equation - Wikipedia
Extinction probability
Extinction probability is the chance of an inherited trait becoming extinct as a function of time t. If t = ∞ this may be the complement of the chance of becoming a universal trait.