Ainu languages
The Ainu languages are a small language family spoken on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaidō, the southern half of the island of Sakhalin, and the Kuril Islands, an island chain that stretches fr...
Ainu languages - Wikipedia
Ban Khor Sign Language
Ban Khor Sign Language (BKSL) is a village sign language used by about 1,000 people of a rice-farming community in the villages of Ban Khor and Plaa Pag in a remote area of Isan (northeastern Thailand...
Tanzanian sign languages
Seven or so Tanzanian sign languages were developed independently among deaf students in separate Tanzanian schools for the Deaf starting in 1963, though use of several is forbidden by their schools. ...
Kusunda language
Kusunda is a language isolate spoken by a handful of people in western and central Nepal. It has only recently been described in any detail.For decades the Kusunda language was thought to be on the ve...
Adamorobe Sign Language
Adamorobe Sign Language (AdaSL) is a village sign language used in Adamorobe, an Akan village in eastern Ghana. It is used by about 30 deaf and 1370 hearing people (2003). The Adamorobe community is n...
Nihali language
Nihali, also known as Nahali or erroneously as Kalto, is a language isolate spoken in west-central India (in Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra) by around 2,000 people (in 1991) out of an ethnic populatio...
Al-Sayyid Bedouin Sign Language
Al-Sayyid Bedouin Sign Language (ABSL) is a village sign language used by about 150 deaf and many hearing members of the al-Sayyid Bedouin tribe in the Negev desert of southern Israel.As deafness is s...
Penang Sign Language
Penang Sign Language was developed in Malaysia by deaf children, outside the classroom, when oralism was predominant. It is now mainly used by older people, although many younger people can understand...
Kutenai language
The Kutenai language (/ˈkuːtᵊneɪ, -ni/), also Kootenai, Kootenay and Ktunaxa, is named after and is spoken by some of the Kutenai Native American/First Nations people who are indigenous to the area of...
Kutenai language - Wikipedia
Washo language
Washo /ˈwɒʃoʊ/ (or Washoe; endonym wá:šiw ʔítlu) is an endangered Native American language isolate spoken by the Washo on the California–Nevada border in the drainages of the Truckee and Carson Rivers...
Washo language - Wikipedia
Ainu Times
The Ainu Times is the only magazine published in the Ainu language. Its first edition was published for 20 March 1997. It uses both special katakana and romanizations in its articles. Its editor as of...
Ethiopian sign languages
A number of Ethiopian sign languages have been used in various Ethiopian schools for the deaf since 1971, and at the primary level since 1956. Ethiopian Sign Language, presumably a national standard, ...
Sapé language
Sapé AKA Kaliana is a nearly extinct language spoken along the Paragua and Karuna rivers. In 2008 a few elderly speakers were found. Sape is one of the most poorly attested extant languages in South A...
Sapé language - Wikipedia
Ka'apor Sign Language
Urubu Sign Language (also known as Urubu–Ka'apor or Ka'apor Sign Language) is a village sign language used by the small community of Ka'apor people in the state of Maranhão. Linguist Jim Kakumasu obse...
Inuit Sign Language
Inuit Sign Language (ISL, or IUR for Inuit Uukturausingit), also known as Eskimo Sign Language and Inuktitut Sign Language, is the indigenous sign language used by Inuit communities in the eastern Arc...
Taiap language
Taiap (also called Gapun, after the name of the village where it is spoken) is an endangered language isolate spoken by around a hundred people in the East Sepik Province of Papua New Guinea. It is be...
Nivkh language
Nivkh or Gilyak /ˈɡɪljæk/ (self-designation: Нивхгу диф Nivxgu dif) is a language spoken in Outer Manchuria, in the basin of the Amgun (a tributary of the Amur), along the lower reaches of the Amur it...
Haida language
Haida /ˈhaɪdə/ (X̱aat Kíl, X̱aadas Kíl, X̱aayda Kil, Xaad kil,) is the language of the Haida people, spoken in the Haida Gwaii archipelago of the coast of Canada and on Prince of Wales Island in Alask...
Haida language - Wikipedia
Karuk language
Karuk or Karok is an endangered language of northwestern California. It is the traditional language of the Karuk people, most of whom now speak English. The name is derived from the word Káruk, which ...
Karuk language - Wikipedia
Huave language
Huave (also spelled Wabe) is a language isolate spoken by the indigenous Huave people on the Pacific coast of the Mexican state of Oaxaca. The language is spoken in four villages on the Isthmus of Teh...
Huave language - Wikipedia
Yuchi language
Yuchi (Euchee) is the language of the Yuchi people living in the southeastern United States, including eastern Tennessee, western Carolinas, northern Georgia and Alabama, in the period of early Europe...
Yuchi language - Wikipedia
Pyu language (Papuan)
Pyu is a language isolate spoken in Papua New Guinea. It has been suggested that Pyu belongs to the Kwomtari–Baibai family, but the evidence has never been published. (See Kwomtari–Baibai.) As of 2000...
Rennellese Sign Language
Rennellese Sign Language is the extinct village sign language of Rennell Island, which has a high degree of congenital deafness. It was developed about 1915 by a deaf person named Kagobai, and was als...
Arutani language
Arutani (Orotani, Urutani, also known as Awake, Auake, Auaqué, Aoaqui, Oewaku, ethnonym Uruak) is a nearly extinct language spoken by only 17 individuals in Roraima, Brazil and two others in the Karum...
Arutani language - Wikipedia