English defamation law
Modern libel and slander laws, as implemented in many (but not all) Commonwealth nations as well as in the United States and in the Republic of Ireland, are originally descended from English defamatio...
Simon Singh
Simon Lehna Singh, MBE (born 19 September 1964) is a British popular science author whose works largely contain a strong mathematical element. His written works include Fermat's Last Theorem (in the ...
Simon Singh - Wikipedia
Fair comment
Fair comment is a legal term for a common law defense in defamation cases (libel or slander).
In the United States, the traditional privilege of "fair comment" is seen as a protection for robust, ...
Absolute privilege in English law
Absolute privilege is a complete defence to an action for defamation in English law. If the defence of absolute privilege applies it is irrelevant that a defendant has acted with malice, knew informat...
Absolute privilege in English law - Wikipedia
Innocent dissemination
A person who is found to have published a defamatory statement may evoke a defence of innocent dissemination, which absolves him/her of liability provided that he/she had no knowledge of the defamator...
Privacy in English law
Privacy in English law is a rapidly developing area of English law that considers in what situations an individual has a legal right to informational privacy - the protection of personal or private in...
Measure of Damages (under English law)
Damages for breach of contract is a common law remedy, available as of right. It is designed to compensate the victim for their actual loss as a result of the wrongdoer’s breach rather than to punish...
Wainwright v Home Office
Wainwright and another (Appellants) versus Home Office (Respondents) [2003] UKHL 53; [2003] 3 WLR 1137 is an English tort law case concerning the arguments for a tort of privacy, and the action for ba...
Parliamentary privilege in the United Kingdom
Parliamentary privilege in the United Kingdom is a legal immunity enjoyed by Members of the House of Commons and House of Lords designed to ensure that Parliamentarians are able to carry out their dut...
Parliamentary privilege in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia
Empress Bianca
Empress Bianca, the first novel by Lady Colin Campbell, was initially published in June 2005. One month later, Arcadia Books Ltd, the British publisher, withdrew the book and pulped all unsold copies ...
Defamation Act 1952
The Defamation Act 1952 (15 & 16 Geo 6 & 1 Eliz 2 c 66) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.This Act implemented recommendations contained in the Report of the Porter Committee. ...
Stockdale v Hansard
Stockdale v Hansard (1839) 9 Ad & El 1 was a case in which the Parliament of the United Kingdom unsuccessfully challenged the common law of parliamentary privilege, leading to legislative reform.<...
Stockdale v Hansard - Wikipedia
Article 12 of the European Convention on Human Rights
Article 12 of the European Convention on Human Rights provides for the right to marry.
Hearne v Stowell
Hearne v. Stowell was an 1841 court case held in the Nisi Prius Court, Liverpool Assizes pertaining to a case of libel in Manchester, England. The case is a prominent case of an inter-clergy lawsuit a...
Law of Libel Amendment Act 1888
The Law of Libel Amendment Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. c.64) was an act passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom, clarifying and "amplifying" the defence of qualified privilege (and potentially ...
Defamation Act 1996
The Defamation Act 1996 (c 31) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
See Absolute privilege in English law
Funding Evil
Funding Evil: How Terrorism is Financed and How to Stop It is a book written by counterterrorism researcher Dr. Rachel Ehrenfeld, director of the American Center for Democracy and the Economic Warfare...
Funding Evil - Wikipedia
Berezovsky v Michaels
Berezovsky v Michaels is an English libel decision in which the House of Lords allowed Boris Berezovsky and Nikolai Glushkov to sue Forbes for libel in UK courts, despite the allegedly libelous materi...
Kaye v Robertson
Kaye v Robertson [1991] FSR 62 is a case in English law, expressing the view that there is no common-law right to privacy in English law.
The case involved Gorden Kaye, a well-known actor, who suf...
John Stockdale
John Stockdale (25 March 1750 – 21 June 1814) was an English publisher whose London shop became a salon for the political classes and who had to face two actions for defamation. One by the House of Co...
John Stockdale - Wikipedia
Libel tourism
Libel tourism is a term, first coined by Geoffrey Robertson, to describe forum shopping for libel suits. It particularly refers to the practice of pursuing a case in England and Wales, in preference t...
Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights
Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights provides a right to respect for one's "private and family life, his home and his correspondence", subject to certain restrictions that are "in acco...
Keith-Smith v Williams
Keith-Smith v Williams is a 2006 English libel case that confirmed that existing libel laws applied to internet discussion.It was seen as important because it was seen as the first UK internet libel c...
Godfrey v Demon Internet Service
Godfrey v Demon Internet Service [2001] QB 201 was a landmark court case in the United Kingdom concerning online defamation and the liability of internet service providers.
Laurence Godfrey, a phy...
Godfrey v Demon Internet Service - Wikipedia
Max Mosley v United Kingdom
Mosley v United Kingdom [2011] 53 E.H.R.R. 30; was a 2011 decision in the European Court of Human Rights regarding the right to privacy under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. An a...