English mythology
Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A varian...
English mythology - Wikipedia
Who Was Lady Godiva?
You might associate the name “Godiva” with a brand of Belgian chocolates, but it was first popularized as part of a 900-year-old English legend. The original Lady Godiva was an 11th century noblewoman...
Lady Godiva
Secondo la leggenda, Lady Godiva (nobildonna anglosassone), moglie del conte Leofrico di Coventry (Inghilterra) prese le parti della popolazione di Coventry,...
Alex Day - Lady Godiva - YouTube
Mar 14, 2012 ... Download Lady Godiva on iTunes: http://dft.ba/-godiva Carrie: http://youtube.com/ itswaypastmybedtime Ciaran: http://twitter.com/ciaranobrien ...
Germanic paganism
Germanic paganism refers to the theology and religious practices of the Germanic peoples from the Iron Age until their Christianization during the Medieval period. It has been described as being "a sy...
Germanic paganism - Wikipedia
Anglo-Saxon Christianity
The history of Christianity in England from the Roman departure to the Norman Conquest is often told as one of conflict between the Celtic Christianity spread by the Irish mission, and Roman Christia...
Anglo-Saxon Christianity - Wikipedia
Christianization of Anglo-Saxon England
The Christianisation of Anglo-Saxon England was a process spanning the 7th century.It is essentially the result of the Gregorian mission of 597, which was joined by the efforts of the Hiberno-Scotti...
Germanic pantheon
The article lists gods and goddesses (Ansewez, Wanizaz) that may be reconstructed for Proto-Germanic or Common Germanic Migration period paganism, or which figure in both West and North Germanic mytho...
Female spirits in Germanic paganism
In Norse mythology, a dís ("lady", plural dísir) is a ghost, spirit or deity associated with fate who can be both benevolent and antagonistic towards mortal people. Dísir may act as protective spirits...
Female spirits in Germanic paganism - Wikipedia
Germanic poetry
In prosody, alliterative verse is a form of verse that uses alliteration as the principal ornamental device to help indicate the underlying metrical structure, as opposed to other devices such as rhym...
Germanic poetry - Wikipedia
Early Anglo-Saxon burial
Burial in Early Anglo-Saxon England refers to the grave and burial customs followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the mid 5th and 7th centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England. There was "an immense range...
Early Anglo-Saxon burial - Wikipedia
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England refers to the belief and practice of magic by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eleventh centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England. In this period, magical practices we...
Magic in Anglo-Saxon England - Wikipedia
Germanic king
Germanic kingship refers to the customs and practices surrounding kings among the pre-Christianization Germanic tribes of the Migration period (circa AD 300-700) and the kingdoms of the Early Middle A...
Dryhten
*Druhtinaz (Old English: dryhten, Old Norse: dróttinn, Old Middle English: drihten, Middle English: driȝten) is a Proto-Germanic term meaning a military leader or warlord and is derived from *druhti ...
Anglo-Saxon monarchs
A succession of monarchs ruled the various independent kingdoms which arose in England following the end of Roman rule in Britain in the 5th century. The most prominent of these kingdoms were Kent, E...
Anglo-Saxon law
Anglo-Saxon law (Old English ǣ, later lagu "law"; dōm "decree, judgement") is a body of written rules and customs that were in place during the Anglo-Saxon period in England, before the Norman conques...
Doom Book
The Doom Book, Code of Alfred or Legal Code of Ælfred the Great was the code of laws ("dooms", laws or judgments) compiled by Alfred the Great (c. 893 AD) from three prior Saxon codes, to which he pre...
List of places named after Odin
Many toponyms ("place names") contain the name of *Wōdanaz (Norse Óðinn, Old English Wōden).
Odensåker, Skaraborg
List of places named after Odin - Wikipedia
English toponymy
The toponymy of England, like the English language itself, derives from various linguistic origins. Modern interpretations are apt to be inexact: many English toponyms have been corrupted and broken d...
English toponymy - Wikipedia
Week-day names
The English language days of the week are named after gods and mythological figures, the product and confluence of an array of contributing cultures and traditions; while some other contemporary names...
Lady Godiva
Godiva (fl. 1040–1067) (/ɡəˈdaɪvə/; Old English: Godgifu), known as Lady Godiva, was an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon noblewoman who, according to a legend dating back at least to the 13th century, rod...
Lady Godiva - Wikipedia
Alemannic paganism
The Alemanni (also Alamanni; Suebi "Swabians") were a confederation of Germanic tribes on the upper Rhine river. First mentioned by Cassius Dio in the context of the campaign of Caracalla of 213, th...
Alemannic paganism - Wikipedia
Wood Green Academy
Wood Green Academy is a secondary school with academy status located in Wednesbury, West Midlands, England. In 2009 Ofsted highlighted Wood Green as one of 12 outstanding schools serving disadvantaged...
Screaming skull
A Screaming skull is a type of paranormal object. Supposedly several such exist today or did so in the past. Screaming human skulls are only found in England, where most counties have at least one suc...