Epicureanism
Epicureanism is a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus, founded around 307 BC. Epicurus was an atomic materialist, following in the steps of Democrit...
Epicureanism - Wikipedia
Tetrapharmakos
The Tetrapharmakos (Greek: τετραφάρμακος), or, "The four-part cure," is the Greek philosopher Epicurus' (341 BC, Samos – 270 BC, Athens) recipe for leading the happiest possible life. The "tetraph...
Tetrapharmakos - Wikipedia
Dum vivimus vivamus
Dum vivimus vivamus is a Latin phrase that means "While we live, let us live." It is often taken to be an epicurean declaration.This latin phrase was the motto of Philip Doddridge's coat of arms.
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Alcaeus and Philiscus
Alcaeus and Philiscus (or Alcius and Philiscus; 2nd-century BC) were two Epicurean philosophers who were expelled from Rome in either 173 BC or 154 BC.Athenaeus states that the expulsion occurred duri...
Villa of the Papyri
14°20′40″E / 40.8078°N 14.3445°E / 40.8078; 14.3445The Villa of the Papyri (Italian: Villa dei Papiri, also known as Villa dei Pisoni) is a private house in the ancient Ro...
Villa of the Papyri - Wikipedia
Herculaneum papyri
The Herculaneum papyri are more than 1,800 papyri found in Herculaneum in the 18th century, carbonized by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79. After various methods of manipulation, a method was f...
Herculaneum papyri - Wikipedia
Augustinian theodicy
The Augustinian theodicy, named for the fourth and fifth-century theologian and philosopher Augustine of Hippo, is a type of Christian theodicy designed in response to the evidential problem of evil. ...
Augustinian theodicy - Wikipedia
Epicurea
Epicurea is a collection of texts, fragments and testimonies by Epicurus composed by Hermann Usener in 1887.
Metakosmia
The metakosmia (Greek: μετακόσμια; Latin: intermundia), according to Epicurean philosophy were the relatively empty spaces in the infinite void where worlds had not been formed by the joining toge...
Themista of Lampsacus
Themista of Lampsacus, the wife of Leonteus, was a student of Epicurus, early in the 3rd century BCE. Epicurus' school was unusual in the 3rd century, in that it allowed women to attend, and we also h...
Themista of Lampsacus - Wikipedia
Katastematic pleasure
In Epicurean philosophy, katastematic pleasure is pleasure felt when being in a particular state, as opposed to kinetic pleasure, which is felt while performing an activity. It is the pleasure that a...
Hedone
Hedone was the personification and goddess of pleasure and enjoyment.Hēdonē (ἡδονή) is an English transliteration of a Greek word meaning pleasure, and is the root of the English word "hedonism". In t...
Dionysius of Lamptrai
Dionysius (3rd century BC) of Lamptrai was an Epicurean philosopher, who succeeded Polystratus as the head (scholarch) of the Epicurean school at Athens c. 219 BC. He died c. 205 BC and was succeeded ...
Dionysius of Lamptrai - Wikipedia
Apollodorus the Epicurean
Apollodorus (Greek: Ἀπολλόδωρος; fl. 2nd century BC) was an Epicurean philosopher, and head of the Epicurean school in Athens.He was according to Diogenes Laërtius surnamed Tyrant of the Garden (G...
Aponia
"Aponia" (Ancient Greek: ἀπονία) means the absence of pain, and was regarded by the Epicureans to be the height of bodily pleasure.As with the other Hellenistic schools of philosophy, the Epicure...
Timocrates of Lampsacus
Timocrates of Lampsacus (Greek: Τιμοκράτης) was a renegade Epicurean who made it his life's mission to spread slander about Epicurus' philosophy and way of life. He was the elder brother of Metrodorus...
Ataraxia
"Ataraxia" (ἀταραξία, "tranquility") is a Greek term used by Pyrrho and Epicurus for a lucid state of robust tranquility, characterized by ongoing freedom from distress and worry.
For Epicureanism...
Natural evil
Natural evil is evil for which “no non-divine agent can be held morally responsible for its occurrence.” By contrast, moral evil is “caused by human activity.” The fact of natural evil challenges, no...
Problem of evil in Hinduism
Hindu answers to the problem of evil are different from most answers offered in Western philosophy, partly because the problem of evil within Hindu thought is differently structured than Western tradi...
Amynomachus
Amynomachus (fl. 3rd century BC), son of Philocrates, from the Attic deme of Bate was, together with Timocrates son of Demetrius from Potamos, the heir of Epicurus (ca. 270 BC). Whether they were Epic...
Amynomachus - Wikipedia
Otium
Otium, a Latin abstract term, has a variety of meanings, including leisure time in which a person can enjoy eating, playing, resting, contemplation and academic endeavors. It sometimes, but not alway...
Otium - Wikipedia
Irenaean theodicy
The Irenaean theodicy is a Christian theodicy designed to respond to the problem of evil. As such, it defends the probability of an omnipotent and omnibenevolent (all-powerful and perfectly loving) Go...
Irenaean theodicy - Wikipedia
Theodicy and the Bible
Theodicy, in its most common form, is the attempt to answer the question of why a good God permits the manifestation of evil. Theodicy attempts to resolve the evidential problem of evil by reconciling...
Theodicy
Theodicy (/θiːˈɒdɪsi/), in its most common form, is the attempt to answer the question of why a good God permits the manifestation of evil. Theodicy attempts to resolve the evidential problem of evil ...
Leonteus of Lampsacus
Leonteus (or Leontius) of Lampsacus, was a pupil of Epicurus early in the 3rd century BCE. He was the husband of Themista, who also attended Epicurus' school. Such was the esteem in which they held Ep...
On Nature (Epicurus)
On Nature is the name of a philosophical treatise written by the Ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus. It was a 37-volume work. While no complete copies exist, numerous fragments have been found among ...
Best of all possible worlds
The phrase "the best of all possible worlds" (French: le meilleur des mondes possibles; German: Die beste aller möglichen Welten) was coined by the German polymath Gottfried Leibniz in his 171...
De rerum natura
De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things) is a first-century BC didactic poem by the Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius (c. 99 BC – c. 55 BC) with the goal of explaining Epicurean philosophy to a Ro...
De rerum natura - Wikipedia
Inconsistent triad
An inconsistent triad consists of three propositions of which at most two can be true. For example:If one finds oneself believing all three propositions of an inconsistent triad, then (in order to be ...
The Difference Between the Democritean and Epicurean Philosophy of Nature
The Difference Between the Democritean and Epicurean Philosophy of Nature (German: Differenz der demokritischen und epikureischen Naturphilosophie) is a book written by the German philosopher Karl...