Evolution of Earth
The geological history of Earth follows the major events in Earth's past based on the geologic time scale, a system of chronological measurement based on the study of the planet's rock layers (stratig...
Evolution of Earth - Wikipedia
Crocodiles and Palm Trees in the Arctic? New Report Suggests Yes.
If we keep burning fossil fuels, Earth will be 8 degrees warmer, returning to the climate of 52 million years ago, according to new research. It's the most dire prediction yet.
Major Jurassic Fossil Site Found In Argentina
Paleontologists in Argentina have announced the discovery of a major Jurassic-era fossil site four years after it was first discovered.
Pre-Reptile May Be Earliest Known To Walk Upright On All Fours
Wandering an arid region of the ancient supercontinent of Pangea about 260-million years ago, the pre-reptile Bunostegos akokanensis is the oldest known creature to have walked upright on all fours, ...
Scientists Discover How Some Of The World’s First Animals Reproduced
Rangeomorphs, which lived about 565 million years ago, were pretty strange. They're often considered to be some of the first animals to evolve on Earth, but they share little in common with modern cri...
Precambrian
The Precambrian (or Pre-Cambrian; sometimes abbreviated pЄ) is the largest span of time in Earth's history before the current Phanerozoic Eon, and is a Supereon divided into several eons of the geolog...
Precambrian - Wikipedia
Hadean
The Hadean /ˈheɪdiən/ is the first geologic eon of Earth and lies before the Archean. It began with the formation of the Earth about 4.5 billion years ago and ended, as defined by the ICS, 4,000 milli...
Hadean - Wikipedia
Archean
The Archean Eon (/ɑrˈkiːən/, also spelled Archaean; formerly Archaeozoic /ɑrkiːəˈzoʊɪk/, also spelled Archeozoic or Archæozoic) is a geologic eon before the Proterozoic Eon, before 2.5 Ga (billion yea...
Proterozoic
The Proterozoic /ˌproʊtərɵˈzoʊ.ɨk/ is a geological eon representing the time just before the proliferation of complex life on Earth. The name Proterozoic comes from Greek and means "earlier life". The...
Proterozoic - Wikipedia
Phanerozoic
The Phanerozoic (British English Phanærozoic) /ˌfænərɵˈzoʊɪk/ is the current geologic eon in the geologic timescale, and the one during which abundant animal life has existed. It covers roughly 542 mi...
Paleozoic
The Paleozoic (or Palaeozoic) Era (/ˌpæliɵˈzoʊɪk/ or /ˌpeɪliɵˈzoʊɪk/; from the Greek palaios (παλαιός), "old" and zoe (ζωή), "life", meaning "ancient life") is the earliest of three geologic eras of t...
Cambrian
The Cambrian (/ˈkæmbriən/ or /ˈkeɪmbriən/) period is the first geological period of the Paleozoic Era, lasting from 541.0 ± 1.0 to 485.4 ± 1.9 million years ago (mya) and is succeeded by the Ordovicia...
Cambrian - Wikipedia
Ordovician
The Ordovician /ɔrdəˈvɪʃən/ is a geologic period and system, the second of six of the Paleozoic Era, and covers the time between 485.4 ± 1.9 and 443.8 ± 1.5 million years ago (ICS, 2004). It follows t...
Ordovician - Wikipedia
Silurian
The Silurian is a geologic period and system that extends from the end of the Ordovician Period, about 443.8 ± 1.5 million years ago (mya), to the beginning of the Devonian Period, about 419.2 ± 3.2 m...
Silurian - Wikipedia
Devonian
The Devonian is a geologic period and system of the Paleozoic Era spanning from the end of the Silurian Period, about 419.2 ± 3.2 Mya (million years ago), to the beginning of the Carboniferous Period,...
Devonian - Wikipedia
Carboniferous
The Carboniferous is a geologic period and system that extends from the end of the Devonian Period, about 358.9 ± 0.4 million years ago, to the beginning of the Permian Period, about 298.9 ± 0.15 Ma. ...
Carboniferous - Wikipedia
Permian
The Permian is a geologic period and system which extends from 298.9 ± 0.15 to 252.17 ± 0.06 million years ago. It is the last period of the Paleozoic Era, following the Carboniferous Period and prece...
Permian - Wikipedia
Mesozoic
The Mesozoic Era /mɛzɵˈzoʊɪk/ is an interval of geological time from about 252 to 66 million years ago. It is also called the age of reptiles, a phrase introduced by the 19th century paleont...
Mesozoic - Wikipedia
Triassic
The Triassic /traɪˈæsɪk/ is a geologic period and system that extends from roughly 250 to 200 Mya (252.17 ± 0.06 to 201.3 ± 0.2 million years ago). It is the first period of the Mesozoic Era, and lies...
Jurassic
The Jurassic (/dʒuːˈræsɪk/; from Jura Mountains) is a geologic period and system that extends from 201.3± 0.6 Ma (million years ago) to 145± 4 Ma; from the end of the Triassic...
Jurassic - Wikipedia
Cretaceous
The Cretaceous (/krɨˈteɪʃəs/, krə-TAY-shəs), derived from the Latin "creta" (chalk), usually abbreviated K for its German translation Kreide (chalk), is a geologic period and system from circa 145 ...
Cretaceous - Wikipedia
Cenozoic
The Cenozoic Era (/sɛnɵˈzoʊɪk/ or /ˌsiːnɵˈzoʊɪk/; also Cænozoic, Caenozoic or Cainozoic; meaning "new life", from Greek καινός kainos "new", and ζωή zoe "life") is the current and most recent of the t...
Cenozoic - Wikipedia
Paleogene
The Paleogene (/ˈpæliːɵdʒiːn/ or /ˈpeɪliːɵdʒiːn/; also spelled Palaeogene or Palæogene; informally Lower Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that began 66 and ended 23.03 million years ago and c...
Paleogene - Wikipedia
Paleocene
The Paleocene (/ˈpæliɵsiːn/ or /ˈpeɪliɵsiːn/; symbol P ) or Palaeocene, the "old recent", is a geologic epoch that lasted from about 66 to 56 million years ago. It is the first epoch o...
Paleocene - Wikipedia
Eocene
The Eocene /ˈiːɵsiːn/ (symbol Eo ) Epoch, lasting from 56 to 33.9 million years ago, is a major division of the geologic timescale and the second epoch of the Paleogene Period in the C...
Eocene - Wikipedia
Oligocene
The Oligocene /ˈɒlɨɡoʊsiːn/ (symbol OG ) is a geologic epoch of the Paleogene Period and extends from about 33.9 million to 23 million years before the present (33.9±0.1 to 23.03±0.05 Ma). ...
Oligocene - Wikipedia
Neogene
The Neogene /ˈniːɵdʒiːn/ is a geologic period and system in the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS) Geologic Timescale starting 23.03 million years ago and ending 2.58 million years ago. Th...
Neogene - Wikipedia
Miocene
The Miocene /ˈmaɪɵsiːn/ (symbol MI) is the first geological epoch of the Neogene Period and extends from about 23.03 to 5.332 million years ago (Ma). The Miocene was named by Sir Charles Lye...
Miocene - Wikipedia
Pliocene
The Pliocene (/ˈplaɪɵsiːn/; also Pleiocene) Epoch (symbol PO) is the period in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.333 million to 2.58 million years before present. It is the second and younges...
Pliocene - Wikipedia
Pleistocene
The Pleistocene /ˈplaɪstɵsiːn/ (symbol P) is the geological epoch which lasted from about 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago, spanning the world's recent period of repeated glaciations.Charles Lyell introd...
Pleistocene - Wikipedia