Figures of speech
A figure of speech is figurative language in the form of a single word or phrase. It can be a special repetition, arrangement or omission of words with literal meaning, or a phrase with a specialized...
Figures of speech - Wikipedia
Buzzword
A buzzword is a word or phrase that becomes very popular for a period of time. It may be a technical term and may have little meaning, being simply used to impress others. Buzzwords often originate in...
Cliché
A cliché or cliche (/ˈkliːʃeɪ/ or /klɪˈʃeɪ/) is an expression, idea, or element of an artistic work which has become overused to the point of losing its original meaning or effect, even to the point o...
Cliché - Wikipedia
Euphemism
A euphemism is a generally innocuous word or expression used in place of one that may be found offensive or suggest something unpleasant. Some euphemisms are intended to amuse; while others use bland,...
Metaphor
A metaphor as a figure of speech identifies something as being the same as some unrelated thing for rhetorical effect, thus highlighting the similarities between the two. It is therefore considered mo...
Metaphor - Wikipedia
Metonymy
Metonymy (/mɨˈtɒnɨmi/ mi-TONN-ə-mee) is a figure of speech in which a thing or concept is called not by its own name but rather by the name of something associated in meaning with that thing or concep...
Onomatopoeia
An onomatopoeia (/ˌɒnɵmaːtəˈpiːə/, or chiefly NZ /-ˈpeɪə/; from the Greek ὀνοματοποιία; ὄνομα for "name" and ποιέω for "I make", adjectival form: "onomatopoeic" or "onomatopoetic") is a word that phon...
Oxymoron
An oxymoron (plural oxymora or oxymorons) is a figure of speech that juxtaposes elements that appear to be contradictory. Oxymora appear in a variety of contexts, including inadvertent errors (such as...
Oxymoron - Wikipedia
Polysemy
Polysemy (/pəˈlɪsɨmi/ or /ˈpɒlɨsiːmi/; from Greek: πολυ-, poly-, "many" and σῆμα, sêma, "sign") is the capacity for a sign (such as a word, phrase, or symbol) to have multiple meanings (that is, m...
Synecdoche
A synecdoche (/sɪˈnɛkdəkiː/, si-NEK-də-kee; from Greek συνεκδοχή synekdoche , meaning "simultaneous understanding") is a figure of speech in which a term for a part of something refers to the whole ...
Dysphemism
A dysphemism is an expression with connotations that are offensive either about the subject matter or to the audience, or both. Dysphemisms contrast with neutral or euphemistic expressions. Dysphemism...
Puns
The pun, also called paronomasia, is a form of word play that suggests two or more meanings, by exploiting multiple meanings of words, or of similar-sounding words, for an intended humorous or rhetori...
Trope
Trope or tropes may refer to:
Two bits
Two bits is an older term used primarily in Canada and the United States to refer to the amount of 25 cents (see Bit (money)). While originally a significant amount of money, with inflation 25 cents h...
Asyndeton
Asyndeton (from the Greek: ἀσύνδετον, "unconnected", sometimes called asyndetism) is a figure of speech in which one or several conjunctions are omitted from a series of related clauses. Examples ...
Catachresis
Catachresis (from Greek κατάχρησις, "abuse"), originally meaning a semantic misuse or error—e.g., using "militate" for "mitigate", "decimate" for "devastate", "our mutual friend" for "our friend in co...
L'esprit de l'escalier
L'esprit de l'escalier or l'esprit d'escalier ("staircase wit") is a French term used in English for the predicament of thinking of the perfect retort too late.
This name for the phenomenon comes ...
Bilingual pun
A bilingual pun is a pun created by a word or phrase in one language sounding similar to a different word or phrase in another language. Bilingual puns are often created by mixing languages, and repre...
Voice (grammar)
In grammar, the voice (also called diathesis and (rarely) gender (of verbs)) of a verb describes the relationship between the action (or state) that the verb expresses and the participants identified ...
Apophasis
Apophasis is a rhetorical device wherein the speaker or writer brings up a subject by either denying it, or denying that it should be brought up. Accordingly, it can be seen as a rhetorical relative ...
Climax (figure of speech)
In rhetoric, a climax (from the Greek κλῖμαξ klimax, meaning "staircase" and "ladder") is a figure of speech in which words, phrases, or clauses are arranged in order of increasing importance.Example...
Correption
In Latin and Greek poetry, correption (/kərˈrɛpʃən/; Latin correptiō [korˈreptɪoː] "a shortening") is the shortening of a long vowel at the end of one word before a short vowel at the beginning of th...
Shadow of the leader
"Shadow of the leader" is a phrase used to describe a common phenomenon in business organizations where those in positions of leadership and power, through their behavior and actions, tend to influenc...
Apheresis (linguistics)
In phonetics, apheresis (/əˈfɛrɨsɪs, əˈfɪərɨsɪs/; British English: aphaeresis) is the loss of one or more sounds from the beginning of a word, especially the loss of an unstressed vowel, thus prod...
Guilty pleasure
A guilty pleasure is something one enjoys and considers pleasurable despite feeling guilt for enjoying it. The "guilt" involved is sometimes simply fear of others discovering one's lowbrow or otherwis...
Pun
The pun, also called paronomasia, is a form of word play that suggests two or more meanings, by exploiting multiple meanings of words, or of similar-sounding words, for an intended humorous or rhetori...
Evolution
The evolutionary history of life on Earth traces the processes by which living and fossil organisms have evolved since life on the planet first originated until the present day. Earth formed about 4.5...
Epanalepsis
The epanalepsis is a figure of speech defined by the repetition of the initial word (or words) of a clause or sentence at the end of that same clause or sentence. The beginning and the end are the two...
Dionysian imitatio
Dionysian imitatio is the influential literary method of imitation as formulated by Greek author Dionysius of Halicarnassus in the first century BCE, which conceived it as the rhetorical practice of e...
Dionysian imitatio - Wikipedia