First Council of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecum...
First Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia
Arius
Arius (Ancient Greek: Ἄρειος, AD 250 or 256–336) was an ascetic Christian presbyter of Libyan birth, possibly of Berber extraction, and priest in Alexandria, Egypt, of the church of the Baucalis....
Arius - Wikipedia
Arianism
Arianism is the nontrinitarian, heterodoxical teaching, first attributed to Arius (c. AD 250–336), a Christian presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt, concerning the relationship of God the Father to the Son ...
Arianism - Wikipedia
Arian controversy
The Arian controversy describes several controversies between the priest and theologian Arius and the Church Father, Bishop Athanasius related to Christology which divided the Catholic Church from bef...
Arian controversy - Wikipedia
Nicene Creed
The Nicene Creed (Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νίκαιας, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is a profession of faith widely used in Christian liturgy.It is called Nicene /ˈnaɪsiːn/ because originally adopted in the cit...
Nicene Creed - Wikipedia
Meletius of Lycopolis
Meletius (died after 325) was bishop of Lycopolis in Egypt. He is known mainly as the founder and namesake of the Meletians (c. 305), one of several schismatic sects in early church history which were...
Development of the Christian biblical canon
The Christian biblical canons are the books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting a Christian Bible. Books included in the Christian biblical canons of both the Old and New Testament...
Development of the Christian biblical canon - Wikipedia
Constantine I and Christianity
While the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337) ruled, Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. Historians remain uncertain about Constantine's re...
Constantine I and Christianity - Wikipedia
Primacy of the Roman Pontiff
The primacy of the Bishop of Rome is an ecclesiastical doctrine concerning the respect and authority that is due to the Bishop of Rome from other bishops and their sees. Together with the Filioque c...
Primacy of the Roman Pontiff - Wikipedia
East-West Schism
The East–West Schism is the break of communion between what are now the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches which began in the 11th century.There had long been ecclesiastical differences and ...
East-West Schism - Wikipedia
Gothic Christianity
Gothic Christianity refers to the Christian religion of the Goths and sometimes the Gepids, Vandals, and Burgundians, who may have used Wulfila's translation of the Bible into Gothic and shared common...
Gothic Christianity - Wikipedia
First Council of Constantinople (360)
In 359, the Roman Emperor Constantius II requested a church council, at Constantinople, of both the eastern and western bishops, to resolve the split at the Council of Seleucia. According to Socrates ...
Germanic Christianity
The Germanic peoples underwent gradual Christianization in the course of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. By AD 700, England and the Frankish Empire were officially Christian, and by 1100 Ger...
Germanic Christianity - Wikipedia
Noesis
Nous (British: /ˈnaʊs/; US: /ˈnuːs/), sometimes equated to intellect or intelligence, is a philosophical term for the faculty of the human mind which is described in classical philosophy as necessary ...
Noesis - Wikipedia
Council of Seleucia
The Council of Seleucia was an early Christian church synod at Seleucia Isauria (now Silifke, Turkey).In 358, the Roman Emperor Constantius II requested two councils, one of the western bishops at Ari...
Fifty Bibles of Constantine
The Fifty Bibles of Constantine were Bibles in Greek language commissioned in 331 by Constantine I and prepared by Eusebius of Caesarea. They were made for the use of the Bishop of Constantinople in t...
Fifty Bibles of Constantine - Wikipedia
Constantine I turn against Paganism
The anti-paganism policy of Constantine I evolved from the initial prohibition on the construction of new temples and the toleration of Pagan sacrifices, to orders for the pillaging and the tearing do...
Constantine I turn against Paganism - Wikipedia
Council of Constantinople (867)
The Council of Constantinople of 867 was convened by Patriarch Photios to address the question of Papal supremacy over all of the churches and their patriarchs and the use of the Filioque.
At leas...
Union of Brest
The Union of Brest, or Union of Brześć, was the 1595-96 decision of the Ruthenian Church of Rus', the "Metropolia of Kiev-Halych and all Rus'", to break relations with the Patriarch of Constantinople ...
Decline of Greco-Roman polytheism
Religion in the Greco-Roman world at the time of the Constantinian shift mostly comprised three main currents:Early Christianity grew gradually in Rome and the Roman Empire from the 1st to 4th centuri...
Decline of Greco-Roman polytheism - Wikipedia
Constantine I and the bishops of Rome
Constantine I's relationship with the four Bishops of Rome during his reign is an important component of the history of the Papacy, and more generally the history of the Catholic Church.The legend sur...
Constantine I and the bishops of Rome - Wikipedia
State church of the Roman Empire
Nicene Christianity became the state church of the Roman Empire with the Edict of Thessalonica in AD 380, when Emperor Theodosius I made it the Empire's sole authorized religion. The Eastern Orthodox ...
State church of the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
Pseudo-Isidore
The Pseudo-Isidorean Decretals (or False Decretals) are a set of extensive and influential medieval forgeries, written by a scholar or group of scholars known as Pseudo-Isidore. The authors, who worke...
Byzantinism
Byzantinism (or Byzantism) is the political system and culture of the Byzantine Empire, and its spiritual successors, in particular, the Balkan states, the Ottoman Empire and Russia. The term byzantin...
Historical development of the doctrine of Papal Primacy
The doctrines of primacy of Simon Peter and primacy of the Roman pontiff are perhaps the most contentiously disputed in the history of Christianity. Many theologians regard the doctrine of papal prim...
Historical development of the doctrine of Papal Primacy - Wikipedia
Nicholas Cabasilas
Nicholas Cabasilas (Greek: Νικόλαος Καβάσιλας; born 1319/1323 in Thessalonica; died 1392) was a Byzantine mystic and theological writer.Cabasilas is a saint within the Orthodox Church. His feast d...
Constantinian shift
Constantinian shift is a term used by Nontrinitarian Christians, as well as Anabaptist and Post-Christendom theologians, to describe the political and theological aspects of the 4th-century process of...
Constantinian shift - Wikipedia
Quartodecimanism
Quartodecimanism (from the Vulgate Latin quarta decima in Leviticus 23:5, meaning fourteenth) refers to the custom of early Christians celebrating Passover beginning with the eve of the 14th day of Ni...
Persecution of early Christians in the Roman Empire
The anti-Christian policies or persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire occurred intermittently over a period of about three centuries until the 313 Edict of Milan issued by Emperors Constantine ...
Persecution of early Christians in the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
Canonical gospels
A gospel is an account describing the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth. The most widely known examples are the four canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, but the term ...
Canonical gospels - Wikipedia