Form
Form is the shape, visual appearance, constitution or configuration of an object. In a wider sense, the form is the way something is or happens.Form may also refer to the following:
Dualism
Dualism (from the Latin word duo meaning "two") denotes the state of two parts. The term 'dualism' was originally coined to denote co-eternal binary opposition, a meaning that is preserved in metaphys...
Dualism - Wikipedia
Formalism (philosophy)
The term formalism describes an emphasis on form over content or meaning in the arts, literature, or philosophy. A practitioner of formalism is called a formalist. A formalist, with respect to some d...
Formalism (philosophy) - Wikipedia
Holism
Holism (from Greek ὅλος holos "all, whole, entire") is the idea that natural systems (physical, biological, chemical, social, economic, mental, linguistic, etc.) and their properties should be viewed ...
Holism - Wikipedia
Monism
Monism is the philosophical view that a variety of existing things can be explained in terms of a single reality or substance. The wide definition states that all existing things go back to a source w...
Monism - Wikipedia
Musical form
The term musical form (or musical architecture) refers to the overall structure or plan of a piece of music, and it describes the layout of a composition as divided into sections. In the tenth edition...
Quantity
Quantity is a property that can exist as a magnitude or multitude. Quantities can be compared in terms of "more," "less," or "equal," or by assigning a numerical value in terms of a unit of measuremen...
Reductionism
Reductionism is a philosophical position that holds that a complex system is nothing but the sum of its parts, and that an account of it can be reduced to accounts of individual constituents. This can...
Structure
Structure is a fundamental, tangible or intangible notion referring to the recognition, observation, nature, and permanence of patterns and relationships of entities. This notion may itself be an obje...
Materialism
Materialism is a form of philosophical monism which holds that matter is the fundamental substance in nature, and that all phenomena, including mental phenomena and consciousness, are the result of ma...
Holarchy
A holarchy, in the terminology of Arthur Koestler, is a connection between holons – where a holon is both a part and a whole. The term was coined in Koestler's 1967 book The Ghost in the Machine. The ...
The Development of the Monist View of History
The Development of the Monist View of History is the major work of the Russian philosopher Georgi Plekhanov, published in 1895. Plekhanov gives an account of modern social and philosophical thought as...
The Development of the Monist View of History - Wikipedia
Monism and dualism in international law
The terms monism and dualism are used to describe two different theories of the relationship between international law and national law. Many states, perhaps most, are partly monist and partly dualist...
Partita
Partita (also partie, partia, parthia, or parthie) was originally the name for a single-instrumental piece of music (16th and 17th centuries), but Johann Kuhnau (Thomaskantor until 1722) and his succe...
Geography
Geography (from Greek γεωγραφία, geographia, lit. "earth description") is a field of science dedicated to the study of the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of the Earth. A liter...
Geography - Wikipedia
Double-Function Form
Double-function form is a musical construction that allows for a collection of movements to be viewed as elements of a single larger musical form. The most famous example of this is Franz Liszt’s Pia...
Two Dogmas of Empiricism
Two Dogmas of Empiricism is a paper by analytic philosopher Willard Van Orman Quine published in 1951. According to City University of New York professor of philosophy Peter Godfrey-Smith, this "pape...
Music written in all 24 major and minor keys
There is a long tradition in classical music (as well as in other genres) of writing music in sets of pieces that collectively cover all the major and minor keys of the chromatic scale. These sets typ...
Music written in all 24 major and minor keys - Wikipedia
Order
Order may refer to:
Complementary holism
Complementary holism is a social theory or conceptual framework proposed by Michael Albert and Robin Hahnel, that sees all societies as consisting of a Human Center and Institutional Boundaries, and t...
The Evolution of Cooperation
The evolution of cooperation can refer to:This article is an introduction to how game theory and computer modeling are illuminating certain aspects of moral and political philosophy, particularly the...
Dualism (politics)
In Dutch politics the term dualism is used to refer to the separation of powers between the cabinet and parliament. In this respect, the way the Dutch cabinets function is somewhere in between the USA...
Incorporeality
Incorporeal or uncarnate means without a physical body, presence or form. It is often used in reference to souls, spirits, the Christian God or the Christian divinity. In ancient philosophy, any atten...
Special sciences
Special sciences are those sciences other than fundamental physics, that are presumed to be reducible to fundamental physics, at least in principle. In this view, chemistry, biology, and neuroscience—...
Abstract structure
An abstract structure in mathematics is a formal object that is defined by a set of laws, properties, and relationships in a way that is logically if not always historically independent of the structu...
Arch form
In music, arch form is a sectional structure for a piece of music based on repetition, in reverse order, of all or most musical sections such that the overall form is symmetric, most often around a ce...
Peşrev
Peşrev (pronounced [peʃˈɾev] in Turkish), Pişrev ([piʃˈɾev]), peshrev, or pishrev; called bashraf بشرف in Arabic; is an instrumental form in Turkish classical music. It is the name of the first piece ...
Physical quantity
A physical quantity (or "physical magnitude") is a physical property of a phenomenon, body, or substance, that can be quantified by measurement.
An extensive quantity is equal to the sum of that q...
Physical quantity - Wikipedia