Friction
Friction is the force resisting the relative motion of solid surfaces, fluid layers, and material elements sliding against each other. There are several types of friction:When surfaces in contact move...
Friction - Wikipedia
How to Make Fire by Rubbing Sticks
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Vanishing Friction
A new technique tunes friction between two surfaces, to the point where friction can vanish. MIT researchers developed a frictional interface at the atomic level. The blue corrugated surface represent...
Normal force
In mechanics, the normal force is the component, perpendicular to the surface (surface being a plane) of contact, of the contact force exerted on an object by, for example, the surface of a floor or ...
Normal force - Wikipedia
Viscosity
The viscosity of a fluid is a measure of its resistance to gradual deformation by shear stress or tensile stress. For liquids, it corresponds to the informal concept of "thickness". For example, hone...
Viscosity - Wikipedia
Lubrication
Lubrication is the process or technique employed to reduce friction between, and wear of one or both, surfaces in close proximity and moving relative to each other, by interposing a substance called a...
Parasitic drag
Parasitic drag is drag that results when an object is moved through a fluid medium (in the case of aerodynamic drag, a gaseous medium, more specifically, the atmosphere). Parasitic drag is a combinati...
Plastic deformation of solids
In physics and materials science, plasticity describes the deformation of a material undergoing non-reversible changes of shape in response to applied forces. For example, a solid piece of metal ...
Deformation (engineering)
In materials science, deformation refers to any changes in the shape or size of an object due to- The first case can be a result of tensile (pulling) forces, compressive (pushing) forces, shear, bendi...
Deformation (engineering) - Wikipedia
Rolling resistance
Rolling resistance, sometimes called rolling friction or rolling drag, is the force resisting the motion when a body (such as a ball, tire, or wheel) rolls on a surface. It is mainly caused by non-ela...
Rolling resistance - Wikipedia
Belt friction
Belt friction is a term describing the friction forces between a belt and a surface, such as a belt wrapped around a bollard. When one end of the belt is being pulled only part of this force is transm...
Tribology
Tribology is the science and engineering of interacting surfaces in relative motion. It includes the study and application of the principles of friction, lubrication and wear. Tribology is a branch o...
Tribology - Wikipedia
Boundary friction
Boundary friction occurs when a surface is at least partially wet, but not so lubricated that there is no direct friction between two surfaces.
When two consistent, unlubricated surfaces slide aga...
Brinelling
Brinelling /ˈbrɪnəlɪŋ/ is the permanent indentation of a hard surface. It is named after the Brinell scale of hardness, in which a small ball is pushed against a hard surface at a preset level of forc...
Gear
A gear or cogwheel is a rotating machine part having cut teeth, or cogs, which mesh with another toothed part to transmit torque, in most cases with teeth on the one gear being of identical shape, and...
Gear - Wikipedia
Lame's stress ellipsoid
Lame's stress ellipsoid (Figure coming) is an alternative to Mohr's circle for the graphical representation of the stress state at a point. The surface of the ellipsoid represents the locus of the end...
Flexural modulus
In mechanics (mechanics is a branch of physics), the flexural modulus or bending modulus is the ratio of stress to strain in flexural deformation, or the tendency for a material to bend. It is determi...
Giordano Riccati
Giordano Riccati or Jordan Riccati (fl. 1782) was the first experimental mechanician to study material elastic moduli as we understand them today. His 1782 paper on determining the relative Young's m...
Friction idiophones
Friction idiophones is designation 13 in the Hornbostel-Sachs system of musical instrument classification. These idiophones produce sound by being rubbed either against each other or by means of a non...
Fire-saw
A fire-saw is a primitive tool to create fire. It is typically an object "sawed" against a piece of wood, using friction to create an ember. It is divided into two components: a "saw" and a "hearth" (...
Fire-saw - Wikipedia
List of tribology organizations
This is a list of organizations involved in research in or advocacy of tribology, the scientific and engineering discipline related to friction, lubrication and wear.
List of tribology organizations - Wikipedia
Mohr's circle
Mohr's circle, named after Christian Otto Mohr, is a two-dimensional graphical representation of the transformation law for the Cauchy stress tensor.After performing a stress analysis on a material b...
Mohr's circle - Wikipedia
Bending
In Applied mechanics, bending (also known as flexure) characterizes the behavior of a slender structural element subjected to an external load applied perpendicularly to a longitudinal axis of the ele...
Bending - Wikipedia
Fatigue limit
Fatigue limit, endurance limit, and fatigue strength are all expressions used to describe a property of materials: the amplitude (or range) of cyclic stress that can be applied to the material without...
Fatigue limit - Wikipedia
Bearing (mechanical)
A bearing is a machine element that constrains relative motion to only the desired motion, and reduces friction between moving parts . The design of the bearing may, for example, provide for free line...
Bearing (mechanical) - Wikipedia
Bow drill
The bow drill is an ancient form of drilling tool. It commonly was used to make fire and in this function it also was called a fire drill. However, the same principle also was used widely in drilling ...
Zerilli-Armstrong plasticity model
Viscoplasticity is a theory in continuum mechanics that describes the rate-dependent inelastic behavior of solids. Rate-dependence in this context means that the deformation of the material depends on...
Zerilli-Armstrong plasticity model - Wikipedia