German Renaissance
The German Renaissance, part of the Northern Renaissance, was a cultural and artistic movement that spread among German thinkers in the 15th and 16th centuries, which originated from the Italian Renai...
German Renaissance - Wikipedia
Conserving Dürer’s Triumphal Arch
Dürer, born #onthisday in 1471, produced one of the largest prints ever – the Triumphal Arch for the Holy Roman Emperor. Altogether it’s nearly 3 meters tall and consists of 36 sheets of paper.
On October 24th 1648, The Treaty Of Westphalia Was Signed, Marking The End Of The Thirty Years War.
The Westphalia area of north-western Germany gave its name to the treaty that ended the Thirty Years War, one of the most destructive conflicts in the history of Europe. The war or series of connected...
Protestant Reformation
The Protestant Reformation - Part 1.
German Renaissance
www.romereports.com These pictures belong to an artist that largely personifies the Renaissance and yet is relatively unknown. Lucas Cranach was born in Germ...
Printing press
What do you think the greatest invention throughout the entire human history? The worlds most famous news media, such as BBC, Wall Street Journal, Washington...
Protestantism
The Protestant Reformation - Part 1.
Printing press
A printing press is a device for evenly printing ink onto a print medium (substrate) such as paper or cloth. The device applies pressure to a print medium that rests on an inked surface made of movabl...
Printing press - Wikipedia
Gutenberg Bible
The Gutenberg Bible (also known as the 42-line Bible, the Mazarin Bible or the B42) was the first major book printed in the West using movable type. It marked the start of the "Gutenberg Revolution" a...
Gutenberg Bible - Wikipedia
Protestant Reformation
The Protestant Reformation, often referred to simply as the Reformation, was the schism within Western Christianity initiated by Martin Luther, John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli and other early Protestant...
Protestant Reformation - Wikipedia
Albrecht Dürer
Albrecht Dürer (/ˈdʊərər, ˈdjʊər-/; [ˈalbʁɛçt ˈdyːʁɐ]; 21 May 1471 – 6 April 1528) was a German painter, engraver, printmaker, mathematician, and theorist from Nuremberg. His high-quality woodcuts (no...
Albrecht Dürer - Wikipedia
German school of fencing
The German school of fencing (Deutsche Schule; Kunst des Fechtens) is the historical system of combat taught in the Holy Roman Empire in the Late Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern periods (14th t...
German school of fencing - Wikipedia
Weser Renaissance
Weser Renaissance is a form of Renaissance architectural style that is found in the area around the River Weser in central Germany and which has been well preserved in the towns and cities of the regi...
Weser Renaissance - Wikipedia
Renaissance architecture in Germany
The German Renaissance, part of the Northern Renaissance, was a cultural and artistic movement that spread among German thinkers in the 15th and 16th centuries, which originated from the Italian Renai...
Leipzig Interim
The Leipzig Interim was one of several temporary settlements between the Emperor Charles V and German Lutherans following the Schmalkaldic War. It was presented to an assembly of Saxon political estat...
On October 24th 1648, The Treaty Of Westphalia Was Signed, Marking The End Of The Thirty Years War.
The Westphalia area of north-western Germany gave its name to the treaty that ended the Thirty Years War, one of the most destructive conflicts in the history of Europe. The war or series of connected...
Schlüsselfelder Ship
The Schlüsselfelder Ship (German: Schlüsselfelder Schiff) is a ship-like German Renaissance table centrepiece. The carrack was made of gilded silver around 1503 in Nuremberg, Germany, possibly by ...
Schlüsselfelder Ship - Wikipedia
Pietism
Pietism (/ˈpaɪɨtɪsm/, from the word piety) was a movement within Lutheranism that began in the late 17th century, reached its zenith in the mid-18th century, and declined through the 19th century, and...
Pietism - Wikipedia
Elizabethan Religious Settlement
The Elizabethan Religious Settlement, which was made during the reign of Elizabeth I, was a response to the religious divisions created in England over the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary I. ...
The Stripping of the Altars
The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England, 1400–1580 is a work of history written by Eamon Duffy and published in 1992 by Yale University Press.
While its title suggests a focus...
The Stripping of the Altars - Wikipedia
Haneburg
Haneburg is a castle with two wings of Leer in East Frisia, Germany. It is one of the few buildings remaining of the Renaissance time in north-west Germany, which was much affected by the Netherla...
Haneburg - Wikipedia
Protestants by country
There are about 800 million Protestants worldwide, among approximately 2.2 billion Christians. These include 300 million in Sub-Saharan Africa, 260 million in the Americas, 140 million in Asia-Pacific...
Protestants by country - Wikipedia
Reformation in Denmark-Norway and Holstein
The Reformation in Denmark–Norway and Holstein was the transition from Roman Catholicism to Lutheranism in the realms ruled by the Copenhagen-based House of Oldenburg in the first half of the sixteent...
Reformation in Denmark-Norway and Holstein - Wikipedia
Cologne City Hall
The City Hall (German: Kölner Rathaus) is a historical building in Cologne, western Germany. It is located off Hohe Straße in the district of Innenstadt, and set between the two squares of Rathau...
Cologne City Hall - Wikipedia