Nerthus
In Germanic paganism, Nerthus is a goddess associated with fertility. Nerthus is attested by Tacitus, the first century AD Roman historian, in his ethnographic work Germania.In Germania, Tacitus recor...
Nerthus - Wikipedia
Zisa (goddess)
Zisa or Cisa is a goddess in Germanic paganism, the best documented version of which is that of 10th and 11th century Norse religion. Zisa is an etymological double of Tyr or Ziu according to 19th cen...
Zisa (goddess) - Wikipedia
Idis (Germanic)
In Germanic mythology, an idis (Old Saxon, plural idisi) is a divine female being. Idis is cognate to Old High German itis and Old English ides, meaning 'well-respected and dignified woman.' Connectio...
Idis (Germanic) - Wikipedia
Frijjō
*Frijjō ("Frigg-Frija") is the reconstructed name or epithet of a hypothetical Common Germanic love goddess, the most prominent female member of the *Ansiwiz (gods), and often identified as the spouse...
Frijjō - Wikipedia
Sunne
Sól (Old Norse "Sun") or Sunna (Old High German, and existing as an Old Norse and Icelandic synonym: see Wiktionary sunna, "Sun") is the Sun personified in Germanic mythology. One of the two Old High ...
Sunne - Wikipedia
Urðr
Urðr (Old Norse "fate") is one of the Norns in Norse mythology. Along with Verðandi (possibly "happening" or "present") and Skuld (possibly "debt" or "future"), Urðr makes up a trio of Norns that are ...
Alaisiagae
In Romano-British culture and Germanic polytheism, the Alaisiagae (possibly "Dispatching Terrors" or "All-Victorious") were a pair of Celtic and Germanic goddesses deifying victory.
The Alaisiagae...
Frigg and Freyja origin hypothesis
Some scholars hypothesize that both Frigg and Freyja may have their origin in a Common Germanic goddess. There is no firm evidence for this, but scholars have found some similarities both in their myt...
Frigg and Freyja origin hypothesis - Wikipedia
Norns
The Norns (Old Norse: norn, plural: nornir) in Norse mythology are female beings who rule the destiny of gods and men, possibly a kind of dísir (see below), and comparable to the Moirai (also called "...
Norns - Wikipedia
Landdísir
In Norse mythology and later Icelandic folklore, landdísir (Old Norse "dísir of the land") are beings who live in landdísasteinar, specific stones located in Northwestern Iceland which were treated wi...
Jörð
In Norse mythology, Jörð (Icelandic "earth", pronounced [ˈjœrð] and from Old Norse jǫrð, pronounced [ˈjɔrð], sometimes Anglicized as Jord or Jorth; also called Jarð, [jɑrð] as in Old East Norse), is a...
Jörð - Wikipedia
Verðandi
In Norse mythology, Verðandi (Old Norse, meaning possibly "happening" or "present"), sometimes anglicized as Verdandi or Verthandi, is one of the norns. Along with Urðr (Old Norse "fate") and Skuld (p...
Verðandi - Wikipedia
Hel (being)
In Norse mythology, Hel is a being who presides over a realm of the same name, where she receives a portion of the dead. Hel is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier t...
Hel (being) - Wikipedia
Rheda (mythology)
In Anglo-Saxon paganism, Rheda (Latinized from Old English *Hrêðe or *Hrêða, possibly meaning "the famous" or "the victorious") is a goddess connected with the month '"Rhedmonth"' (from Old English *H...
Ēostre
Ēostre or Ostara (Old English: Ēastre, Northumbrian dialect Ēostre; Old High German: *Ôstara) is a Germanic divinity who, by way of the Germanic month bearing her name (Northumbrian: Ēosturmōn...
Ēostre - Wikipedia
Æsir
In Old Norse, ǫ́ss (or áss, ás, plural æsir; feminine ásynja, plural ásynjur) is the term denoting a member of the principal pantheon in the indigenous Germanic religion known as Norse religion. This ...
Æsir - Wikipedia
Dís
In Norse mythology, a dís ("lady", plural dísir) is a ghost, spirit or deity associated with fate who can be both benevolent and antagonistic towards mortal people. Dísir may act as protective spirits...
Dís - Wikipedia
Rán
In Norse mythology, Rán (Old Norse "sea" or "robber") is a sea goddess. According to Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda book Skáldskaparmál, in his retelling of the Poetic Edda poem Lokasenna, she is marri...
Rán - Wikipedia
Valkyrie
In Norse mythology, a valkyrie (from Old Norse valkyrja "chooser of the slain") is one of a host of female figures who choose those who may die in battle and those who may live. Selecting among half o...
Valkyrie - Wikipedia
Skuld
Skuld (the name possibly means "debt" or "future") is a Norn in Norse mythology. Along with Urðr (Old Norse "fate") and Verðandi (possibly "happening" or "present"), Skuld makes up a trio of Norns tha...
Skuld - Wikipedia
Wyrd
Wyrd is a concept in Anglo-Saxon culture roughly corresponding to fate or personal destiny. Their concept of fate, wyrd, was stronger than that of the Classical Pagans as there was no resisting it. T...
Þorgerðr Hölgabrúðr and Irpa
In Norse mythology, Þorgerðr Hǫlgabrúðr and Irpa are female æsir, divine figures. Þorgerðr and Irpa appear together in Jómsvíkinga saga, Njáls saga and Þorleifs þáttr jarlsskálds. Irpa does not appear...
Þorgerðr Hölgabrúðr and Irpa - Wikipedia