Gluon
Gluons /ˈɡluːɒnz/ are elementary particles that act as the exchange particles (or gauge bosons) for the strong force between quarks, analogous to the exchange of photons in the electromagnetic force b...
Gluon - Wikipedia
Long-Sought-After 'Glueball': Exotic Particle May Have Been Discovered
Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have calculated that the meson f0(1710) could be a very special particle – the long-sought-after glueball, a particle composed of pure force. For decades, scientists hav...
Gluon
http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... The Standard Model of Particle Physics (Episode 4): Gluons --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.y...
Color confinement
Color confinement, often simply called confinement, is the phenomenon that color charged particles (such as quarks) cannot be isolated singularly, and therefore cannot be directly observed. Quarks, by...
Color confinement - Wikipedia
TASSO
The TASSO collaboration refers to the group of people working on the TASSO detector, at PETRA, at DESY. They are famous for having discovered the gluon, the mediator of the strong interaction and carr...
TASSO - Wikipedia
PLUTO detector
PLUTO, constructed at DESY laboratories in Hamburg in 1973-1974 and substantially upgraded in 1977-1978, was an experimental detector for high energy particle physics.
PLUTO was the first electrom...
Glueball
In particle physics, a glueball is a hypothetical composite particle. It consists solely of gluon particles, without valence quarks. Such a state is possible because gluons carry color charge and exp...
Three-jet event
In particle physics, a three-jet event is an event with many particles in final state that appear to be clustered in three jets. A single jet consists of particles that fly off in roughly the same dir...
Three-jet event - Wikipedia
Color charge
Color charge is a property of quarks and gluons that is related to the particles' strong interactions in the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The color charge of quarks and gluons is completely...
Color charge - Wikipedia