Hattians
The Hattians (/ˈhætiənz/) were an ancient people who inhabited the land of Hatti in central Anatolia (present-day Turkey). The group was documented at least as early as the empire of Sargon of Akkad (...
Hattians - Wikipedia
Hattic language
Hattic (Hattian) was a non-Indo-European, agglutinative language spoken by the Hattians in Asia Minor between the 3rd and the 2nd millennia BC. Scholars call this language 'Hattic' to distinguish it f...
Hattic language - Wikipedia
Hattusa
Hattusa (Hittite: 𒌷𒄩𒀜𒌅𒊭, Ḫa-at-tu-ša, read "Ḫattuša", Turkish: Hattuşaş) was the capital of the Hittite Empire in the late Bronze Age. Its ruins lie near modern Boğazkale, Turkey, within the ...
Hattusa - Wikipedia
Puruli
Puruli (EZEN Puruliyas) was a Hattian spring festival, held at Nerik, dedicated to the earth goddess Hannahanna, who is married to a new king.The central ritual of the Puruli festival is dedicated to ...
Nerik
Nerik (Hittite: Nerikka) was a Bronze Age city to the north of the Hittite capitals Hattusa and Sapinuwa. The Hittites held it as sacred to a storm god who was the son of Wurušemu, sun goddess of Arin...
Hatepuna
Hatepuna, also known as Hatepinu, is a Hattian goddess.Her Name originates in Hattic ha, "sea", and puna, "Child". She is the daughter of the sea god and becomes the wife of Telipinu because of the re...
Sapinuwa
Sapinuwa (sometimes Shapinuwa; Hittite: Šapinuwa) was a Bronze Age Hittite city at the location of modern Ortaköy in the province Çorum in Turkey. It was one of the major Hittite religious and adminis...
Sapinuwa - Wikipedia
Zalpuwa
Zalpuwa, also Zalpa, was an as-yet undiscovered Bronze Age Anatolian city of ca. the 17th century BC. Its history is largely known from the Proclamation of Anitta, CTH 1.Zalpuwa was by a "Sea of Zalpa...
Zalpuwa - Wikipedia
Zippalanda
Zippalanda was a Hattic administrative and religious center of the Hittite Old Kingdom. Although its name was known from inscriptions, a plausible site was not established by scholars till the latter ...
Alaca Höyük
34°41′44″E / 40.23444°N 34.69556°E / 40.23444; 34.69556Alacahöyük or Alaca Höyük (sometimes also spelled as Alacahüyük, Aladja-Hoyuk, Euyuk, or Evuk) is the site of a Neolithi...
Alaca Höyük - Wikipedia