Hawaiian mythology
Hawaiian narrative or mythology, tells stories of nature and life. It is considered a variant of a more general Polynesian narrative, developing its own unique character for several centuries before a...
Hawaiian mythology - Wikipedia
Hiʻiaka
In Hawaiian mythology, Hiʻiaka is a daughter of Haumea and Kāne.
Hiʻiaka, or the youngest Hiiaka, was the patron goddess of Hawaiʻi, hula dancers, chant, sorcery and medicine. O...
Paʻao
Paʻao is either a figure from a Hawaiian legend or a historical character. He is said to have been a high priest from Kahiki, specifically "Wawau" and "'Upolu." In Hawaiian prose and chant, the ...
Wākea
In Hawaiian mythology, Wākea is a god of the sky, the eldest son of Kahiko ("Ancient One"), and lives in Olalowaia. He is the ancestor of the aristocracy (alii) and grandson of Welaahilaninui. The pri...
Kapo (mythology)
In Hawaiian mythology, Kapo is a goddess of fertility, sorcery and dark powers who can assume any shape she wills. She is the mother of Laka, although some versions have them as the same goddess. Sh...
Māui (Hawaiian mythology)
In Hawaiian mythology, Māui is a culture hero and ancient chief who appears in several different genealogies. In the Ulu line he is the son of ʻAkalana and his wife Hinakawea (Hina). This couple...
Māui (Hawaiian mythology) - Wikipedia
Kahōʻāliʻi
In the mythology of Kauaʻi, Hawaii, Kahōʻāliʻi is a god sometimes associated with the underworld.
On various ceremonial occasions, a dark man, naked, impersonated Kahōʻāliʻi. The...
Kahōʻāliʻi - Wikipedia
Apukohai
Apukohai is a marine monster in the mythology of the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Kawelo, a giant of enormous strength, departs for Oahu and encounters Apukohai. After a fierce struggle, Kawelo kills Apuk...
Papahānaumoku
Papahānaumoku, sometimes called Papa is the earth mother goddess in Hawaiian religion of the Kanaka Maoli. Together with her husband Wākea (sky father) Papa is the ancestor of all people and Kalo, and...
O'ahu ‘Elepaio
The Oʻahu ʻelepaio (Chasiempis ibidis) is a monarch flycatcher found on the Hawaiian Island of Oahu.It is now restricted to an area of 47 square kilometers (18 sq mi) in the Koʻolau and Wa...
Ukupanipo
In Hawaiian mythology, Ukupanipo is a shark god who controls the amount of fish close enough for the fisherman to catch. He occasionally adopted a human child who gains the power to transform into a s...
Menehune
In Hawaiian mythology, the Menehune are said to be a people, sometimes described as dwarfs in size, who live in the deep forests and hidden valleys of the Hawaiian Islands, far from the eyes of normal...
Menehune - Wikipedia
Nuakea (deity)
In Hawaiian mythology, Nuakea is a beneficent goddess of milk and lactation.This name was also a title for a wet nurse of royal prince, according to David Malo.Nuakea was appealed to staunch the flow ...
Paliuli
In Hawaiian mythology, Paliuli is the equivalent of the Garden of Eden, a legendary paradise and the home of Princess Laieikawai (Lā'ie-i-ka-wai). It was used for several place names, including a suga...
Nana-Ula
In Hawaiian mythology, Nana-Ula is the hero who led his people from Tahiti to Hawaii. He was the first King of Hawaii, and began the royal dynasty.
Kaupeepeenuikauila
Kaupeʻepeʻe-nui-kauila, Hawaiian Prince of Molokai, the son of Kamauaua, king of Molokai, appears in Hawaiian legends. Probably the best-known was his elopement with Hina, queen of Hilo, t...
Kaupeepeenuikauila - Wikipedia
Kaha'i
Kaha'i (specifically: Hawaii; elsewhere Tafaki, Tafa'i, Tahaki, Tava'i, Tāwhaki) is a handsome Polynesian demigod whose exploits were popular in many Polynesian mythologies.
In Hawaiian mythology,...
Nu'u
In Hawaiian mythology, Nu'u was a man who built an ark with which he escaped a Great Flood. He landed his vessel on top of Mauna Kea on the Big Island. Nu'u mistakenly attributed his safety to the mo...
Kumulipo
In ancient Hawaiian mythology, the Kumulipo is a chant in the Hawaiian language telling a creation story. It also includes a genealogy of the members of Hawaiian royalty.
Many cultures have their ...
Laʻieikawai
In Hawaiian mythology, Laʻieikawai (Lāʻie-i-ka-wai) and her twin sister La'ielohelohe were princesses, and were born in Lāʻie, Oʻahu. They were seprarated and hidden away from...
Kumu-Honua
In Hawaiian mythology, Kumu-Honua ("first on Earth") is the first man. He was married to Lalo-Honua; the couple was given a garden by Kāne and were forbidden from eating a particular fruit. This sto...
In Hawaiian mythology Kū or Kū-ka-ili-moku is one of the four great gods along with Kanaloa, Kāne, and Lono.Feathered god images or 'aumakua hulu manu are considered to represent Kū. Kū is worshipped ...
Kū - Wikipedia
Lalo-Honua
In Hawaiian mythology, Lalo-Honua (Hawaiian, "below Earth") is the first woman. She was married to Kumu-Honua; the couple was given a garden by Kāne and were forbidden from eating a particular fruit....
Kauaʻi ‘Elepaio
The Kauaʻi ʻelepaio (Chasiempis sclateri) is a monarch flycatcher found on the Hawaiian Island of Kauai. It numbered 40,000 around 1970, but declined by half in the 1990s. Whether this fl...
Mauiloa
According to Hawaiian mythology, Mauiloa was a High Chief (Alii) of Maui. He is mentioned in legends and old chants and was likely a semi-historical person or character from myths.He had control over ...
Pakaa
In Hawaiian mythology, Pakaʻa is the god of the wind and the inventor of the sail.In the legend, Pakaʻa was the child of a traveling royal named Kuanuʻuanu and a beautiful common woman named Laʻamaoma...
Pakaa - Wikipedia
Kanaloa
In the traditions of ancient Hawaiʻi, Kanaloa is symbolized by the squid or by the octopus, and is typically associated with Kāne. It is also the name of an extinct volcano in Hawaiʻi.In l...
Kukohou
In Hawaiian mythology, Kukohou (or Kukohoa) was the High Chief of Hawaii island in ancient Hawaii. He was either a character of legends and chants or semi-mythical ruler.His title was Aliʻi Aimo...