Heracles
Heracles (/ˈhɛrəkliːz/ HERR-ə-kleez; Ancient Greek: Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklēs, from Hēra, "Hera", and kleos, "glory"), born Alcaeus (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero i...
Heracles - Wikipedia
Labours of Hercules
The twelve labours of Hercules (Greek: ἄθλοι, athloi) are a series of episodes concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes, whose name was later Romanised as Hercul...
Labours of Hercules - Wikipedia
Omphale
In Greek mythology, Omphale (Ancient Greek: Ὀμφάλη) was a daughter of Iardanus, either a king of Lydia, or a river-god. Omphale was queen of the kingdom of Lydia in Asia Minor; according to Bibli...
Omphale - Wikipedia
Heracleidae
In Greek mythology, the Heracleidae (/hɛrəˈklaɪdiː/; Ancient Greek: Ἡρακλεῖδαι) or Heraclids /ˈhɛrəklɪdz/ were the numerous descendants of Heracles (Hercules), especially applied in a narrower se...
Heracleidae - Wikipedia
Hercules
Hercules is the Roman name for the Greek divine hero Heracles, who was the son of Zeus (Roman equivalent Jupiter) and the mortal Alcmene. In classical mythology, Hercules is famous for his strength a...
Hercules - Wikipedia
Hercules in popular culture
Hercules (Greek Heracles) is a mythological hero known for his strength and far-ranging adventures. He is one of the most commonly portrayed figures from classical mythology in the popular culture of ...
Hercules in popular culture - Wikipedia
Hesione
In Greek mythology and later art, the name Hesione /hɨˈsaɪ.əniː/ refers to various mythological figures, of which the Trojan princess Hesione is most known.
According to the Bibliotheca, the most ...
Hesione - Wikipedia
Xenoclea
Xenoclea, who appears as a character in the legend of Hercules, was the Pythia, or priestess and oracle, of the temple of Apollo at Delphi. The Delphic oracle was a historical reality and was establis...
Xenoclea - Wikipedia
Capture of Oechalia
The Capture of Oechalia (traditionally The Sack of Oechalia, Ancient Greek: Οἰχαλίᾱς Ἅλωσις) is a fragmentary Greek epic that was variously attributed in Antiquity to either Homer or Creophylus o...
Herakles' Children
Herakles' Children (Ancient Greek: Ἡρακλεῖδαι, Hērakleidai; also translated as Children of Herakles and Heracleidae) is an Athenian tragedy by Euripides that was first performed c. 430 BC. It fol...
Herakles' Children - Wikipedia
Alexicacus
Apollo Alexicacus (Ancient Greek: Ἀλεξίκακος), the "averter of evil", was an epithet given by the Ancient Greeks to several deities, such as Zeus, and Apollo, who was worshiped under this name by the ...
Cynosarges
Cynosarges (Greek: Κυνόσαργες Kynosarges) was a public gymnasium located just outside the walls of Ancient Athens on the southern bank of the Ilissos river. Its exact location is unknown but it is now...
Promachus
Promachus /ˈprɒməkəs/ (Greek: Πρόμαχος; English translation: "who leads in battle") is a name that refers to several different people.
Promachus - Wikipedia
Megara (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Megara (/ˈmɛɡərə/; Greek: Μεγάρα) was the oldest daughter of Creon, king of Thebes. In reward for Heracles' defending Thebes from the Minyans at Orchomenus in single-handed battle...
Conservation issues of Pompeii and Herculaneum
Pompeii and Herculaneum were once thriving towns in the Bay of Naples. Though both cities have rich histories influenced by Greeks, Oscans, Etruscans, Samnites and finally the Romans, they are most re...
Conservation issues of Pompeii and Herculaneum - Wikipedia
Lityerses
In Greek mythology, Lityerses (Λιτυέρσης) was an illegitimate son of Midas (or of Comis) dwelling in Celaenae, Phrygia. He challenged people to harvesting contests and beheaded those he beat, putting...
Heracles Kynagidas
Heracles Kynagidas (Κυναγίδας, "The Huntsman") was the patron god of hunting in the Macedonian Kingdom, to whom hunting trophies were dedicated. The epithet was also attributed to "Artemis Kynago" Κυν...
Antiope (Amazon)
In Greek mythology, Antiope (/ænˈtaɪ.əpiː/; Greek: Ἀντιόπη) was an Amazon, daughter of Ares and sister to Melanippe and Hippolyte and possibly Orithyia, queens of the Amazons,. She was the wife of...
Pyrene (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Pyrene (Greek: Πυρήνη) may refer to:
Hercules Pavilion
The Hercules Pavilion (Danish: Herkulespavillonen) is a pavilion located in Rosenborg Castle Gardens in central Copenhagen, Denmark. Its history dates back to the foundation of the park in 1606 but it...
Hercules Pavilion - Wikipedia
Hercules (comics)
Hercules, or Heracles, in comics, may refer to:
Herakles (Euripides)
Herakles (Ancient Greek: Ἡρακλῆς μαινόμενος, Hēraklēs Mainomenos, also known as Hercules Furens) is an Athenian tragedy by Euripides that was first performed c. 416 BCE. While Herakles is in the ...
Herakles (Euripides) - Wikipedia
Macistus
Macistus or makistos is a term derived from Doric Greek meaning tallest or greatest.
Makistios was an epithet of Heracles, who had a temple in the neighbourhood of the town of Macistus in Triphyli...
Herculaneum
Located in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius, Herculaneum (Italian: Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows in 79 AD. Its ruins are located in the commune of Ercolano, C...
Herculaneum - Wikipedia
Echembrotus
Echembrotus (Greek: Ἐχέμβροτος) was an ancient Arcadian Greek lyricist and poet. According to Pausanias, Echembrotus offered a bronze tripod to Heracles when the latter won at the Amphictyonic Gam...
Echembrotus - Wikipedia
Lepreus (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Lepreus (Λεπρεύς) was a son of Caucon (Glaucon) or Pyrgeus, and grandson of Poseidon; one account calls him son of Poseidon. His mother was Astydameia, daughter of Phorbas.Lepreus ...
Lepreus (mythology) - Wikipedia
Heracles Papyrus
The Heracles Papyrus (Sackler Library, University of Oxford, Pap. Oxyrhynchus 2331) is a fragment of a 3rd-century Greek manuscript of a poem about the Labors of Heracles. It contains three unframed c...
Heracles Papyrus - Wikipedia
Termerus
In Greek mythology, Termerus (Τέρμερος) was a bandit who was killed by Heracles. The episode is referenced in Plutarch's Life of Theseus, in description of Theseus' method of slaying his assailants by...